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A. Introducing a New Course in an Existing Program
1. An instructor may, in consultation with the department, develop a new course.
2. Courses maybe taught on an experimental basis with a prospectus with approval of the department and the dean of the college.
3. Before a new course is taught for the second time, the department shall review and approve the syllabus. Upon approval, the department chair shall furnish copies of the syllabus to the dean of the college.
4. The dean of the college shall determine whether the course and the syllabus are in harmony with faculty policy, Principles of Graduate Education, and institutional
objectives and is authorized to delay the offering of the course if the syllabus is
unacceptable. As necessary, the dean of the college shall consult with department
chairs and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies in order to resolve
problems that may arise. In cases where institutional policy conflicts with the plans of a department, the Graduate Policies Committee will examine the problem and
recommend policy changes.
5. When the change involves courses related to teacher licensure, the department
sponsoring the course should consult with the department of teacher education unit, and as needed to the appropriate state regulatory agencies responsible for licensure.
6. After approval of the course syllabus by the department and the dean of the college, the dean of the college shall announce to the faculty the adoption of the course into the curriculum in regular publication for faculty and staff and shall list it in the next catalog.
Course descriptions will normally be printed in the catalog for those courses that are offered regularly and for which a syllabus has been approved.
7. Criteria for Acceptance of New Courses. In terms of criteria for the acceptance of a new course, the proposed course will do one or more of the following:
a. help meet the mission of the university and college and their general objectives in a way not already offered through an existing course;
b. reflect the Principles of Graduate Education;
c. be fiscally feasible in terms of staffing and instructional materials resources;
d. meet state of Minnesota licensure requirements (if applicable);
e. afford opportunity to utilize resources due to the college’s geographic locations;
f. contribute to the curriculum in a meaningful way as evidenced by research;
g. add depth to a presently set emphasis, certificate or degree;
h. fill specific needs expressed by students/graduates;
i. serve as an enrichment opportunity in the overall learning experiences of the
student;
j. provide opportunity for particular faculty members to utilize their expertise;
k. provide special opportunity for experimentation with innovative methodology;
l. strengthen a particular academic field;
m. contribute to the development of graduate opportunities for leadership
development for community and/or church.
All new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should demonstrate an affirmative response to the following questions.
5 gates for consideration of new academic programs
1. Is there a market for the new program?
2. Do we have the capacity to deliver?
3. If we don’t have the internal capacity, who is our external partner?
4. How does it fit with university mission, vision, and promise?
5. Will it contribute to the revenue stream of the University?
Proposers for new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should consult with the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies in preparation for the written proposal. The general outline for the proposal is listed below. In addition, proposers should follow the “calendar steps” leading to approval of the proposal.
Developing new courses for a new graduate program.
Courses should be developed based on the approved proposal.
Steps:
1. For each course, faculty should be identified, having the content expertise to
complete the task.
2. The syllabus and course should be developed concurrently.
a. The course should be developed in the Learning Management System
(Blackboard) in alignment with the standard template.
b. Content and assignments should be included in the course.
3. The syllabus and course should be peer reviewed. One member from the
department (who is able to comment thoughtfully on the content), and one from
outside the department (someone from the college who has online learning
experience). Reviewers’ names and dates should be included in a footer.
4. Submit syllabus and course to dean for final approval. Stipend request.
5. The creator of the syllabus and course should expect to teach the course the first time.
6. Revisions to the syllabus and course, based on instructor review and student
feedback, should be made and sent to the department chair or dean for final
approval. Stipend request.
B. Introducing a New Emphasis
1. The emphasis shall support the mission of the university.
2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the emphasis.
3. New Emphases shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review.
4. The Emphasis should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome project. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee.
C. Introducing a New Certificate Program
1. The certificate shall support the mission of the university.
2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the certificate.
3. The certificate program, a package of courses available for credit shall support the mission of the university.
4. New certificates shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review.
5. The Certificate should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome project. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee.
D. Introducing a New Program or Degree
1. The program or degree shall support the mission of the university.
2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the program or degree.
3. Board of Regents can request and approve development of an academic program or degree, LCMS 3.8.3.6.4 (LCMS Handbook).
4. President can make academic program recommendations to the Board of Regents, LCMS 3.8.3.7 (LCMS Handbook).
5. New programs or degrees shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review.
6. The program or degree should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome Capstone. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee.
E. Procedures for the Approval of New Courses, Emphases, Certificate Programs and Degrees. The Graduate Policies Committee, in cooperation with other units of the university, establishes the procedures by which new courses, emphases, certificate programs and degrees are developed.
F. Procedure for undergraduate / graduate program development.
The institution’s policy and practice assure that at least 50% of courses applied to a graduate program are courses designed for graduate work, rather than undergraduate courses credited toward a graduate degree. (An institution may allow well-prepared advanced students to substitute its graduate courses for required or elective courses in an undergraduate degree program and then subsequently count those same courses as fulfilling graduate requirements in a related graduate program that the institution offers. In “4+1” or “2+3” programs, at least 50% of the credits allocated for the master’s degree – usually 15 of 30 – must be for courses designed for graduate work.). [from the Higher Learning Commission]

Last modified: March 15, 2018