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Graduate Student Policies

APPENDIX
Summary Guide to Graduate School Policies (Section 9)   The policies included in Section 9 and summarized below are administered through the Graduate School and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies.   Principles of Academic Curricular Policy. All graduate programs must have a research course, ethics course, and a Capstone component (Graduate Core) approved by the Graduate Policies Committee at the time of program approval. All substantive changes made to Graduate Core courses (research, ethics, and capstone) must be approved by the Graduate School via Graduate Policies Committee (9.11).   Definitions. There are many academic definitions identified in Section 9.12.  Notably, the following criteria is used to designate graduate faculty (9.12).   Faculty who meet the following criteria will be designated as graduate faculty, be eligible to serve on the graduate committee, and have voting privileges in plenary meetings. Graduate faculty will annually be designated by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, and each of the Collegiate Deans.   Designated Graduate Faculty must meet 2 of the 3 following criteria:
  • Graduate faculty must hold a terminal degree in an appropriate field of study or at minimum a master’s degree or clinical specialization in an appropriate field of study plus significant professional experience (10,000 hours minimum).
  • Graduate faculty will teach graduate level courses on a regular basis or be administratively responsible for an approved graduate program (see FH 9.21).
  • Graduate faculty must be active in research appropriate to the field or discipline. Documentation of research should be submitted to the Graduate School annually.
  Graduate Faculty should meet the following criteria in an ongoing manner:
  • Graduate faculty must be active in research appropriate to the field or discipline.
  • Graduate faculty must have significant professional experience related to degree program or courses of study.
  • Faculty will possess appropriate current experience in graduate level teaching.
  • Graduate faculty must advise graduate students and be willing to serve on graduate student capstone committees.
  • Graduate faculty may serve as members of the graduate Policies Committee.
  Principles of Graduate Study. Coursework at the graduate level is not just different classes than the undergraduate. It is not simply more information on a particular topic. It is designed to be a qualitatively different experience. Concordia University has accepted these principles as the practical ways graduate education will be delivered at Concordia (9.13).   Changing Graduate Curricular Requirements.  Procedures for changing a course, modifying the graduate core, graduate certificate, graduate program or program emphasis.  Please consult the approval process for each (9.14).       Program Integrity and Responsibility to Graduate Policy.   The Graduate Program Department Chair/Coordinator is responsible for:
  • The content of the learning outcomes and curriculum for the graduate programs in their respective areas.
  • For knowing, understanding, and implementing approved Graduate policies and procedures.
  • For demonstrating to the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) how programs meet Graduate policies and procedures. The AVP-GS reports specifically how each program is responding to the approved graduate policies, procedures and initiatives to the Graduate Policies Committee.
Procedures for programs failing to meet approved policies, procedures, and initiatives are described (9.15).   Degrees Offered.  This list of approved programs is updated annually (9.21).   Annual Assessment.  Graduate programs of the university will be assessed annually. Program directors, department chairs, or emphasis coordinators will be responsible for the implementation of assessment plans.  [Assessment plans are to be submitted in June, each academic year] (9.22).   Accreditation. [updates pending] (9.23)
  1. Higher Learning Commission (HLC).
  2. National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (CAEP).
  3. Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).
  4. National Council on Family Relations (NCFR).
  5. Minnesota State Board of Teaching (BOT).
  6. Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).
  7. National Commission on Orthotic and Prosthetic Education (NCOPE) & Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).
  Proposals for New Courses, Emphases, Certificates, Programs or Degrees [updates pending]. All new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should demonstrate an affirmative response to the following questions (9.24).   5 gates for consideration of new academic programs
  1. Is there a market for the new program?
  2. Do we have the capacity to deliver?
  3. If we don’t have the internal capacity, who is our external partner?
  4. How does it fit with university mission, vision, and promise?
  5. Will it contribute to the revenue stream of the University?
  Proposers for new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should consult with the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies in preparation for the written proposal.  The general outline for the proposal is listed below.  In addition, proposers should follow the “calendar steps” leading to approval of the proposal.   Introducing a new proposal
  • The new proposal shall support the mission of the university.
  • University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the new proposal.
  • New proposals shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, associate vice-president for graduate studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review.
  • The new proposal should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome project. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee.
  Admission to Program.  Admission criteria are outlined for the master’s, educational specialists, doctorate of physical therapy, and the educational doctorate degrees (9.32).   Enrollment by CSP Faculty and Staff.  Parameters for enrollment are outlined. (9.33).   International Students.  International students must provide proof of English proficiency (if English is not the student’s first language). The policy outlines how proficiency can be established (9.34).   Undergraduate Admission to Graduate Courses.  Normally undergraduate students are not permitted to enroll in graduate courses without being admitted to the graduate program (9.35).   Transfer Credit.  (9.37)
  1. Up to 6 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the MA (MS). The credits must be appropriate to the student’s program and the course(s) must be equivalent to the course(s) in the program (i.e. outcomes (objectives) need to match). Application for transfer of credit is made by the student to the Advisor. The credits must be certified by the Registrar and approved for the degree program by the program director.
  2. Up to 9 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the Ed.S.
  3. Up to 12 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the Ed.D.
  4. Normally no credits will be accepted for transfer into the DPT program.
  5. Only courses with a grade of B or better may be accepted for transfer credit.
  6. Normally credits older than five years will not be accepted.
  7. The chair of the graduate program or designee will make the determination whether a student is required to audit a course in place of taking the course for a grade.
  8. Students taking graduate level courses as part of a Concordia University St. Paul graduate certificate, approved by the Graduate Policies Committee, may apply the entire graduate certificate’s credits to the graduate program to which it is connected.
  9. Specific programs and/or departments may establish institutional articulation agreements with other accredited institutions. Proposals outlining such agreements should be presented to the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, who will report such to the Graduate Policies Committee prior to approval.
  Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy for Graduate Students.  To achieve satisfactory academic progress, a graduate student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade – point average (CGPA) and complete a minimum cumulative of 67% of all attempted graduate level coursework. Incompletes (I) and withdrawals (W) do not count toward completion.  When a student does not maintain satisfactory progress, the University will impose certain restrictions that will affect the student’s eligibility for enrollment (Academic Probation; Academic Disqualification).  A description of these restrictions, along with the Disqualification Appeal Process can be found in the policy (9.41).   Attendance Policies. The Graduate School assumes that all registered students have freely accepted personal responsibility for regular class attendance. Students are expected to attend all class meetings and laboratory sessions for the courses in which they are enrolled. In cases of emergencies and/or unforeseen circumstances students are expected to notify their instructors and arrange for any possible “makeup” assignments; however, instructors are not required to allow for such “makeup” assignments.   All graduate programs/courses will have a stated attendance policy included in each syllabus. (9.42)   Additional attendance guidelines and requirements for graduate students:  
  • While it is the student’s responsibility to communicate with the instructor regarding an absence, if the instructor has not heard from the student, and the student is not participating, the instructor should attempt to contact the student and the program’s academic advisor.
  • If a student must miss a class/chat because of an emergency or illness, he/she is required to contact the professor in order to identify and complete his/her regular assignment(s) and complete a make-up assignment that contributes to the subject being studied and enhances the class-learning environment.
  • A missed class/chat may be made up for partial credit.
  • If a student misses two classes/chats, the instructor and the student need to discuss the student’s ability to complete the course. In addition, the student will be required to complete his/her regular assignment(s) and extra work. Specific procedures should be outlined in the syllabus.
  • Any additional absences will require retaking the course. The student will be billed and a grade will be issued each time the course is taken.
  • Regular attendance is a key factor in determining the continuing financial aid support. Attendance will be used to calculate the amount of aid to be returned if a student used Financial Aid (Title IV) and student discontinues enrollment or withdraws.
  • Instructors understand the uncertainty of military requirements and other contractual obligations, and they will work with the student to meet educational goals.
  • It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to make appropriate arrangements.
  • All Chats and/or Web Ex sessions will be recorded as part of Financial Aid (Title IV) requirement to verify the last date of attendance.
  • Students with short or long term disability concerns that may affect attendance should register with Student Accessibility Services. However, course participation is essential to courses and generally expected in accordance with this policy.
  Program Requirements.  (9.43)
  1. A master’s degree graduate degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 30 semester credits with a grade – point average of 3.00 or better. All master’s students must pass their Capstone at 80% or higher.
  2. A Doctor of Physical Therapy degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 100 semester credits beyond a bachelor’s degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or better.
  3. An Educational Specialist degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 30 semester credits beyond a master’s degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or better.
  4. An Educational Doctorate degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 60 semester credits beyond a master’s degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or better.
  5. All post – graduate students must meet the approval of their Capstone or Dissertation committee.
  Adviser and Committee (9.44)
  1. Adviser. All students will be assigned an advisor. All students shall receive academic advice from a graduate CSP faculty person.
  2. Committee. A student’s committee shall consist of a committee chair and one or two readers approved by the program director. The chair of the committee shall be CSP graduate faculty. Exceptions shall be approved by the program director.
  Grading. Grade reports are available online at the end of each course.  Conceptual Grading Standards for all programs in the Graduate School, In-Progress Grades, Repeating a Course, Withdrawing, Changing or Appealing a Grade After It Has Been Issued, and procedures for Appealing a Grade are detailed in the policy (9.45).   Time Limits. (9.46)
  1. Master’s degree programs must be completed within five years of the beginning of the first course.
  2. Ed.S. degree programs must be completed within six years of the beginning of the first course.
  3. Ed.D. degree programs must be completed within seven years of the beginning of the first course.
  4. DPT degree programs must be completed within four years of the beginning of the first course.
  Appeal of Policy and Procedure. (9.47) Steps for making an appeal (re-admission, grade course change, or academic integrity).
  1. Student submits completed Appeal of Academic Dishonesty Graduate Form to the Dean’s Office.
  2. The Dean reviews the form and determines if appeal should be granted based on stated reason for appeal.
    1. If Request for Appeal is denied, the Dean will email the student with reason for denial.
    2. If Request` for Appeal is approved, the Dean will email the student and follow-up.
  3. If denied, the student may appeal the decision to the Graduate Appeals Committee.
    1. Submit appeal to the Associate Vice-President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) for consideration by the Graduate Academic Appeals Committee.
    2. If Request for Appeal is denied, the AVP-GS will email the student with reason for denial.
    3. If Request for Appeal is approved, the AVP-GS will email the student and follow-up.
  4. Final Appeal Option
    1. If denied, the student may appeal a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If appeal is denied, the student can appeal the decision a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
    2. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will review the case and email the student of decision and reason.
    3. No further appeals are allowed after this decision.
  University and Program Requirements. Students must complete all requirements as specified by the University and Program (9.51).   Date for Transcripts and Diploma. Transcripts and diplomas will reflect the degree awarded and the term date during which all academic work was completed (9.52).   Completion of Requirements.  Candidates who complete all course requirements within 30 calendar days following the end of a regular academic term at Concordia University are listed as graduates of that term.  Degree requirements are completed when all grades for course have been filed and recorded by the Registrar (9.53)   Commencement. Students will be invited to participate in the annual commencement ceremony in May providing all course work will be completed by the forthcoming September.  Students who are unable to participate in the May ceremony may graduate in absentia (9.54).   Research with Human Subjects (9.62).  
  1. Ethical and policy issues in research involving human participants are grounded in Concordia University, St. Paul’s mission in the enlightened care of God’s creation and the safeguarding of human participants in all research under which the University is a part. The University will comply with all federal regulations requiring the establishment and operation of an Institutional Review Board for the protection of human participants.
 
  1. All research that can be defined as “a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge” (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services – 45 CFR 46) must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Participants (IRB).
 
  1. IRB review is also required of research carried out under the sponsorship of an institution other than Concordia University, St. Paul, but which is performed on the premises of Concordia University, St. Paul, even if the research has already been approved by the IRB at the sponsoring institution or elsewhere.
 
  1. Students and Faculty who are planning to conduct research are directed to use and follow FHB Section 8, Appendix D: Concordia University Saint Paul, MN Protocols and Procedures for Research Involving Human Subjects Application and Information Packet and Appendix E: Protocol Form Research Involving Human Subjects.
 
  1. Faculty and student researchers must successfully complete Human Subjects training through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program prior to submitting protocol forms for IRB review. All researchers must maintain valid (non-expired) certification of CITI training. The CITI certification is good for three (3) years from date of successful completion.
  Release of Student Information.  Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Concordia University defines the following information as directory information: the student’s name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and teams, dates of attendance, degree and awards received, and the most recent educational institution attended by the student. This information may be released unless the student notifies the Registrar of a specific hold (9.63).   Textbook Selection. Graduate course texts will be approved by the program chair (9.64).   Faculty Communication with Graduate Students. Graduate faculty will be available for student contact by personal appointment, phone consultation, or email interaction. All student requests for a response shall be honored in a timely manner (9.65).   Academic Integrity for Graduate Students (9.66).  Academic integrity is essential to any academic institution and is in keeping with the mission of Concordia University. In order to protect the rights of students, the disciplinary procedure for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty follows these broad guidelines. Violations of academic integrity include “cheating” and “plagiarism” as defined by the university’s Graduate Student Code of Conduct.   The procedures for implementing academic integrity policies including following due process are detailed in the policy.  See procedure for appeals in (9.47)   Dissertation Fees.  Students enrolled in the Educational Doctorate degree program must pay an additional fee to cover the costs of the dissertation committee members and editing of the dissertation. The fee will be made known to the student at the time of acceptance into the program (9.70).

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UNIVERSITY CLOSINGS
The personal safety of students, faculty and staff is vital to the Concordia University. While Concordia University expects that individuals make a good faith effort to travel to campus during inclement weather conditions if the university is operating and does not declare an emergency closing, it is also important for individuals to use their own discretion in determining whether it is safe for them to travel to campus.  
  1. On rare occasions when weather has been determined to pose a potential threat to the life or safety of students, staff, and faculty, the decision to close the university will be made using these guidelines:
  2. By 7:00 a.m. decisions regarding closing and cancellation or delay of day classes will be made.
  3. By 11:00 am decisions regarding cancellation of afternoon classes will be made
  4. By 2:00 p.m. decisions regarding cancellation of face-to-face evening classes or University sponsored evening events will be made.
  5. Notices regarding closings, cancellations or delays will be immediately posted on the Concordia University Campus Portal web page. This should be used as the primary resource for students, staff and faculty, since detailed will be included in this location.
  6. Cohort-based online classes are canceled on a class-by-class basis.
  7. The university will notify local media stations (including KARE channel 11; WCCO channel 4; KSTP channel 5 as well as WCCO Radio (AM830) and KTIS Radio (FM 98.5FM) regarding closings or cancellations. Please be reminded that we cannot control how rapidly these media locations update their announcements.
  8. Use the E2 campus notification that is available for text message announcements. Sign up at http://concordia.csp.edu/Security/E2Campus/Index%20Page.html


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V. COMMENCEMENT (FH 9.54)
  • Students will be invited to participate in the annual commencement ceremony in May providing all course work will be completed by the forthcoming September.
  • Students who are unable to participate in the May ceremony may graduate in
absentia.
  • The graduation/capstone fee will be assessed regardless of participation in the
graduation ceremony.

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U. COMPLETION OF REQUIREMENTS (FH 9.53)
  • Candidates who complete all course requirements within 30 calendar days following the end of a regular academic term at Concordia University are listed as graduates of that term.
  • Degree requirements are completed when all grades for courses have been filed and recorded by the Registrar.


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T. LEAVE OF ABSENCE/UNIVERSITY WITHDRAWAL
A University Withdrawal form should be completed if a student is planning to take one or more semesters off from their studies. In the section indicating the reason for withdrawal, select the term you would like to resume your studies in the drop-down box on the form.

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S. REFUND PROCEDURE
You have until the day before the start of the sixth day of the term to drop a course without record or charge.  After that deadline you will receive no refund and a “W” grade will be recorded for the course.

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R. REGISTRATION PROCESS
You will register for your classes online through CSP Connect.  The deadline for adding a course is the day before the start of the part of term.  However, it is highly recommended that you register for your classes no later than 1 week prior to the start of the part of term to assure your access to Blackboard and a smooth transition into the course.  The deadline for dropping a course without record or charge is before the start of the sixth day of the part of term.  The deadline for dropping a course and receiving a “W” grade is before the start of the sixth week of the part of term.  These dates for each term will be posted on CSP Connect.  Any late adds or drops will require a Registration Restriction form accompanied by a general petition, processed through your academic adviser.  If you are dropping your last or only course in a term you will need to contact your academic adviser for assistance.

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Q. FINANCIAL HOLDS
If you are not current in your payments to Concordia University (on an approved payment plan) or have an unpaid balance on your student account, you may be placed on financial hold. While you are on financial hold:  
  • You will not be allowed to register for the next term.  If you have already pre-registered for a term and have an outstanding balance from the previous term you will be dropped from your classes and your access to Blackboard will be disabled.
  • Your unpaid balance is subject to finance charges or late fees.
  • Since you are not registered, financial aid for the next term will be canceled.
  • If you do not register for the upcoming term, your student loans will lose current in-school deferment and may go into repayment status.
  • You will be responsible for payment of all costs associated with the collection of your unpaid balance, including finance charges, collections fees, and attorney‘s fees.
  • You will not receive any transcripts or diploma.
  • If you are a veteran, your benefits will be discontinued.
  • You will not be retroactively registered for any course missed. You will need to contact your academic adviser to make up missed courses.


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P. APPEAL OF POLICY AND PROCEDURE (FH 9.47)
The Graduate Appeals Committee Appointed by the Associate Vice President (AVP) for Graduate Studies, the Graduate Appeals Committee will hear the appeal and review all relevant documents.  The AVP may request additional documentation from the student and/or other departments within the University. The Graduate Appeals Committee will consist of the AVP for Graduate Studies, the registrar, the AVP for Graduate Enrollment, a member from the Graduate Policies Committee, and a Collegiate Dean. This committee will review all academic disqualification appeals for graduate students.
  1. Graduate students may appeal decisions made by program faculty or
administrators regarding disqualification, re-admission, grade change, or academic integrity regarding entry into a program, continuation in a program, or questions that may arise as a result of a candidate’s academic performance in a program.
  1. Steps for making an appeal (re-admission, grade course change, or academic
integrity).
  1. Student submits completed Appeal of Academic Dishonesty Graduate Form to the Dean’s Office.
  2. The Dean reviews the form and determines if appeal should be granted based on stated reason for appeal.
    1. If Request for Appeal is denied, the Dean will email the student with reason for denial.
    2. If Request` for Appeal is approved, the Dean will email the student and follow-up.
  3. If denied, the student may appeal the decision to the Graduate Appeals Committee.
    1. Submit appeal to the Associate Vice-President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) for consideration by the Graduate Academic Appeals Committee.
    2. If Request for Appeal is denied, the AVP-GS will email the student with reason for denial.
    3. If Request for Appeal is approved, the AVP-GS will email the student and follow-up.
  4. Final Appeal Option
    1. If denied, the student may appeal a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If appeal is denied, the student can appeal the decision a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
    2. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will review the case and email the student of decision and reason.
    3. No further appeals are allowed after this decision.


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O. SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (FH 9.41)
To achieve satisfactory academic progress, a graduate student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average (CGPA) and complete a minimum cumulative of 67% of all attempted graduate level coursework. Incompletes (I) and withdrawals (W) do not count toward completion.

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Graduate Academic Appeals Committee (FH 9.45)
The Graduate Policies Committee serves as a group of faculty and administrators to hear student academic and non-academic appeals. If students believe an academic or non-academic action has been taken, the student may follow the appeal procedures outlined in FH policies 9.47 and 9.66.

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Grade Appeal (FH 9.45)
The appeal of a grade must follow the appeals process found in FH 9.47.

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Changing or Appealing a Grade After It Has Been Issued (FH 9.45)
Errors in recording or miscalculation must be changed no later than the end of the semester following the error. Grade changes must have accompanying documentation and be approved by the Department or Program Chair and the Dean of the College in which the program resides. Students who wish to appeal a final grade will follow the procedures found in FH 9.47. The appeal must be initiated no later than 5 university business days after grades are officially posted by the registrar’s office.

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Repeating a Course (FH 9.45)
A student may repeat a course in which a grade of C, D, N or F has been earned upon approval by the program director and the college dean.  While all grades remain on the student’s academic record and transcript, only the highest grade awarded will be used in calculating the student’s grade point average.

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N. Grading System (FH 9.45)
The following scale is used in evaluating a student’s work: A     Superior   4.00 B     Good                   3.00 C     Fair                      2.00 F     Failure                 0.00 I      In-Progress – A student not completing required coursework before the end of a course may, at the discretion of the instructor, receive an “in –progress” (I) grade for the course.  The student must complete an “In-Progress Request Form” and have it approved by the course instructor and the Program Director or Chair. W    Withdraw – A student may request the grade of “W” before a course is 80% complete, based upon the course calendar.  If the course is more than 80% complete, the student’s grade is calculated based upon graded components stated in the syllabus. P     Pass (not included in grade point calculations) N     No-pass (not included in grade point calculations)

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M. GRADE POSTING
Grades are generally processed by noon one week after the course concludes.  You may check your CSP Connect account for these grades one to two weeks after a course has completed.  Students are responsible for monitoring their grades and academic status.

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L. CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICIES (FH 9.42)
The Graduate School assumes that all registered students have freely accepted personal responsibility for regular class attendance. Students are expected to attend all class meetings and laboratory sessions for the courses in which they are enrolled. In cases of emergencies and/or unforeseen circumstances students are expected to notify their instructors and arrange for any possible “makeup” assignments; however, instructors are not required to allow for such “makeup” assignments. All graduate programs/courses will have a stated attendance policy included in each syllabus. Additional attendance guidelines and requirements for graduate students:
  • While it is the student’s responsibility to communicate with the instructor regarding an absence, if the instructor has not heard from the student, and the student is not participating, the instructor should attempt to contact the student and the program’s academic advisor.
  • If a student must miss a class/chat because of an emergency or illness, he/she is required to contact the professor in order to identify and complete his/her regular assignment(s) and complete a make-up assignment that contributes to the subject being studied and enhances the class-learning environment. A missed class/chat may result in a grade reduction.
  • A missed class/chat may be made up for partial credit.
  • If a student misses two classes/chats, the instructor and the student need to discuss the student’s ability to complete the course. In addition, the student will be required to complete his/her regular assignment(s) and extra work. Specific procedures should be outlined in the syllabus.
  • Any additional absences will require retaking the course. The student will be billed and a grade will be issued each time the course is taken.
  • Regular attendance is a key factor in determining the continuing financial aid support. Attendance will be used to calculate the amount of aid to be returned if a student used Financial Aid (Title IV) and student discontinues enrollment or withdraws.
  • Instructors understand the uncertainty of military requirements and other contractual obligations, and they will work with the student to meet educational goals.
  • It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to make appropriate arrangements.
  • All Chats and/or Web Ex sessions will be recorded as part of Financial Aid (Title IV) requirement to verify the last date of attendance.
  • Students with short or long term disability concerns that may affect attendance should register with Student Accessibility Services. However, course participation is essential to courses and generally expected in accordance with this policy.


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K. Graduate Student Academic Reporting Form
All incidents related to the following issues are to be reported by graduate faculty at the following link: https://publicdocs.maxient.com/reportingform.php?ConcordiaUnivStPaul&layout_id=3 This information is immediately available to the Associate Vice President of Graduate Studies and may be shared with the department chair at the dean’s discretion. [This form is available on CSP Connect – Faculty Resources tab]   Academic Integrity for Graduate Students (FH 9.66)  
  1. Definition of Terms
 
  1. Academic integrity is essential to any academic institution and is in keeping with the mission of Concordia University. In order to protect the rights of students, the disciplinary procedure for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty follows these broad guidelines. Violations of academic integrity include “cheating” and “plagiarism” as defined by the university’s Student Code of Conduct (SCC).
 
  1. The term “cheating” includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; (2) dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; (3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the University faculty or staff; or (4) academic deception (e.g. fabricating data, misrepresenting sources, misleading presentations, lying) in written or oral form.
 
  1. The term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.
 
  1. The term “recycling” may be new to some. Instructors expect that work submitted in a course is original work done for that course. These are two examples of recycling:
  • Submitting your own work, which has been submitted and graded for an earlier course, for a second course.
  • Submitting your own published work as original work for a course.
 
  1. Implementation of Academic Integrity Policies
 
  1. The instructor will gather and document all evidence of academic dishonesty in a clear and concise manner. The instructor will complete a Graduate Student Academic Report following an initial discussion with the student. The report should assist in clarifying root issues.
 
  1. The instructor will present this evidence to the student. The instructor will notify the student in writing that this has been done and will indicate the Dean of the College will provide information for the appeal process.
 
  1. The instructor may prescribe academic penalties, including but not restricted to, the requirement of additional work, an assignment of a failing grade on the work in question, or a failing grade for the entire course. Any prescribed penalties must be in writing and include instructions for the appeal process. These should be documented through the Graduate Student Academic Report.
 
  1. If this is a repeated occurrence, the Department Chair may impose additional penalties, including but not limited to dismissal from the departmental program, suspension from the university, or expulsion from the university.
 
  1. A student has the right to appeal the academic penalties imposed by the instructor by filing an appeal with the Collegiate Dean within 3 university business days of the documented imposition of penalties. A response regarding the appeal is normally received within 15 university business days.
 
  1. Steps for Appeal Regarding Academic Dishonesty can be found in the Faculty Handbook, 9.47.


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H. Codes of Conduct (Student and Faculty)
Graduate Student Code of Conduct Concordia is recognized for educating students who are prepared to become responsible leaders in their respective disciplines. An effective learning environment where students and faculty value integrity, professionalism and diligence provides a foundation for achieving our mission. To that end, Concordia graduate students are expected to live out this mission in the following areas. Professionalism
  • Exhibiting classroom behavior (email, dress, etc.) that is personally and professionally respectful to faculty and fellow students will lay a foundation for effective learning.
  • Being dependable and arriving to class on time (and not leaving early) will foster healthy team norms.
  • Remaining current with assigned readings and completing assignments on time will foster a sense of learning and minimize student and faculty stress.
Honesty
  • Being the sole author of your work is vital; to that end, be sure to cite provide references and sources in your submissions.
  • Sharing personal and professional experiences is paramount to shared learning; however, remember that conversations in the course room should remain confidential.
  • Submitting ‘the same’ assignment in more than one course is not good practice for ongoing professional development; you must complete unique work for each deliverable throughout your program.
Respect
  • Refraining from the use of phones and other electronic equipment during class gives everyone the opportunity to give full attention to others and the instructor.
  • Respecting the university’s staff and being responsible stewards of its facilities creates a collaborative and pleasant environment for learning.
  • Going above and beyond minimum expectations helps to develop a culture of learning and high performance.
Collegiality
  • Being open to new thoughts, ideas, and people creates a welcoming environment and fosters a sense of creativity.
  • Holding oneself accountable and contributing fully to team assignments develops a sense of team spirit and unity.
  • Challenging others, celebrating achievements, and being encouraging, patient, and helpful fosters an inspiring learning environment.
  • The potential for conflict is a natural part of human interaction; however, it is important that we share such concerns with candor and remain respectful, confidential, and professional.
  Cohort Procedures – Department Chairs or Program Directors may operationalize the above constructs (Professionalism, Honesty, Respect, and Collegiality) in specific terms as they apply to their program of study.  
  1. Course Feedback Form
Near the conclusion of each course, Concordia Information Technology will send a message to your CSP email with instructions for completing the end of course feedback form.

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G. Research with Human Subjects (FH 9.62)
  1. Ethical and policy issues in research involving human participants are grounded in Concordia University, St. Paul’s mission in the enlightened care of God’s creation and the safeguarding of human participants in all research under which the University is a part. The University will comply with all federal regulations requiring the establishment and operation of an Institutional Review Board for the protection of human participants.
  2. All research that can be defined as “a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge” (S. Department of Health & Human Services – 45 CFR 46) must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Participants (IRB).
  3. IRB review is also required of research carried out under the sponsorship of an institution other than Concordia University, St. Paul, but which is performed on the premises of Concordia University, St. Paul, even if the research has already been approved by the IRB at the sponsoring institution or elsewhere.
  4. Students and Faculty who are planning to conduct research are directed to use and follow FHB Section 8, Appendix D: Concordia University Saint Paul, MN Protocols and Procedures for Research Involving Human Subjects Application and Information Packet and Appendix E: Protocol Form Research Involving Human Subjects.
  5. Faculty and student researchers must successfully complete Human Subjects training through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program prior to submitting protocol forms for IRB review.  All researchers must maintain valid (non-expired) certification of CITI training. The CITI certification is good for three (3) years from date of successful completion.
  Program coordinators and/or instructors will help facilitate the Human Subjects Protocol procedures with students.  The student’s faculty (Principle Investigator) mentor will submit the application through the IRB procedure.

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F. Accreditation
Higher Learning Commission (HLC), re-accreditation granted in 2008.
  1. National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (CAEP) re-accreditation granted in 2008.
iii.       National Council on Family Relations (NCFR), BA in Family Science re-accreditation granted in 2014. MA in Family Science re-accreditation granted in 2010.
  1. Minnesota State Board of Teaching re-approval granted in 2008.
  2. Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) granted re-certification for BA and MA in Human Resource Management in 2014.
  3. National Commission on Orthotic and Prosthetic Education (NCOPE) provides an accreditation recommendation to the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).  The accreditation is granted through 2024.
vii.  Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) on behalf of the National Commission on Orthotic and Prosthetic Education (NCOPE) granted continuing accreditation to the MS in Orthotics and Prosthetics in 2014. Accreditation is granted through 2024. viii. Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) provides candidacy for the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program.  Concordia is a candidate for Accreditation, a pre-accreditation status of affiliation with CAPTE.

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Graduate School Student Outcomes
  1. Synthesize theoretical and research concepts from multiple perspectives to inform inquiry and practice.
    1. Foster creativity – transition to meet the new world through practitioner and applied methods.
    2. Develop cognitive & methodological flexibility and adaptability.
    3. Encourage resilience in the face of impasses (in the environment).
    4. Actively contribute to the body of knowledge.
    5. Demonstrate and apply knowledge as a reflective practitioner.
 
  1. Formulate creative responses to complex issues through critical analysis.
    1. We have the “notion” to change the world through our graduate work capstones.
    2. Through our graduate work, we strive toward “impact,” modeling good research and problem-solving.
    3. Connect with meaningful internships and/or clinical practice opportunities that demonstrate our commitment to the research practitioner’s model.
    4. We will document the impact of our capstones, projects, or theses on organizations, corporations, community, and society.
    5. Organizations and the people they serve do better as a result of our student’s work with them.
    6. Is this true?
 
  1. Model ethical and professional behaviors to guide inquiry and practice in a global and diverse society.
    1. Exemplify Christian service within their organizations and communities.
    2. A sense of professionalism.
    3. Communicate respectfully and effectively.
    4. Pursue opportunity from a sense of Christian vocation.
    5. Demonstrate and encourage lifelong learning.
 
  • Consult the specific Program Handbook Supplement for program outcomes.


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E. Principles of Graduate Study and Graduate School Student Outcomes
Principles of Graduate Study Graduate Education is designed to be a qualitatively different experience from undergraduate education. Coursework at the graduate level is not just different classes than at the undergraduate level, nor is it simply more information on a particular topic. The following principles serve as the practical styles and approaches through which graduate education is delivered at Concordia University St. Paul.  
  1. Graduate coursework is more creative. Students learn to create systems of thinking and acting that will help them to be more effective professionals.
  2. Graduate coursework is more self-directed. Students often decide how to fashion an assignment to help them apply and synthesize the material more appropriately.
  3. Graduate coursework is more rigorous. More is expected of the graduate student (in the way of research, thought and productivity) than of the certificate or undergraduate student.
  4. Graduate coursework is more attentive to epistemological issues. More attention is given to “how we know what we know,” and to how we prove and support what we know. Skills of discernment and critical thinking are developed deliberately.
  5. Graduate coursework is more attentive to research. Students will be exploring (and conducting) new research. They will read, critique, and may contribute to original research.
  6. Graduate coursework is more a community of learners, than merely a teacher-student relationship. Graduate students are assumed to have reached an intellectual maturity that puts them at a place where the role of the instructor is different. Instructors do not have to spoon-feed or hand-hold; instructors need to guide and mentor the mature student in the direction that the student has identified.  Problem-based and/or team-based pedagogies may be used.
  7. Graduate learning is not just remembering information, it is constructing knowledge. As they engage, the community of learners opens new insights and creates new knowledge in the field.
  8. Graduate students give careful consideration to information skills and bibliographic references. The skills of knowledge navigation will be increasingly important in the years ahead, and graduate students learn how to find the knowledge they need.
  9. Graduate professors actively participate in research, professional engagement, and learning. This helps them maintain a cutting edge in their profession and bring the most up-to-date information to their students.
  “It is the role of graduate education to explore and advance the limits of knowledge and to define the state of the art in every field.  Its purpose is to serve society’s needs in specific technical and professional ways, but also to serve the need for intellectual expansion.  Graduate education is a major source of future intellectual leaders of society…”   Adapted from Organization and Administration of Graduate Education: A Policy Statement, Council of Graduate Schools

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D. Graduate School Mission
The mission of the Graduate School at Concordia University St. Paul is to define and support excellence in graduate education and the research and scholarly activities associated with it.

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C. University Promise
Concordia University, St. Paul empowers you to discover and engage your purpose for life, career and service in a dynamic, multicultural, urban environment where Christ is honored, all are welcome, and Lutheran convictions inform intellectual inquiry and academic pursuits.

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B. University Mission
The mission of Concordia University, a university of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod is to prepare students for thoughtful and informed living, for dedicated service to God and humanity, and for the enlightened care of God’s creation, all within the context of the Christian Gospel.

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Graduate School Policies and Procedures Handbook 2017-18
The policies included in this handbook are administered through the Graduate School and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies.    
  1. Introduction: President’s Welcome
  Welcome to Concordia University, St. Paul!   Concordia University seeks to serve God and our global community by preparing students for thoughtful and informed living, dedicated service to God and humanity and enlightened care of God’s creation, all within the context of the Christian Gospel. Our alumni consistently tell us that we empowered them to succeed in their academic work, discover a great deal about their own sense of vocation, and prepare for their chosen career field with relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes. Located in the heart of the City of St. Paul, we are committed to our urban community, with its rich racial, ethnic, and multicultural character. Furthermore we honor Jesus Christ as Lord, while at the same time welcoming individuals from many faith traditions to our campus and online cohorts. Our highly educated, trained, and caring faculty and staff offer their knowledge, disciplined research methodology, listening ears and hearts, and Christian values to each student program wide.   Recently, Concordia became known as one of the most affordable private higher education options in the United States by reducing tuition for its traditional undergraduate students by $10,000, while maintaining our already competitive pricing for adult-undergraduate and graduate programs. The result has been extraordinary growth in enrollments across the entire University. I encourage you to join us in your educational leadership roles in your home communities and expand the circle of student success wherever you serve. We are here to help you achieve your educational and vocational goals and to that end celebrate your success as well. Rev. Tom Ries

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Grad Student Policy #1
This is an important policy

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Uncategorized

APPENDIX
Summary Guide to Graduate School Policies (Section 9)   The policies included in Section 9 and summarized below are administered through the Graduate School and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies.   Principles of Academic Curricular Policy. All graduate programs must have a research course, ethics course, and a Capstone component (Graduate Core) approved by the Graduate Policies Committee at the time of program approval. All substantive changes made to Graduate Core courses (research, ethics, and capstone) must be approved by the Graduate School via Graduate Policies Committee (9.11).   Definitions. There are many academic definitions identified in Section 9.12.  Notably, the following criteria is used to designate graduate faculty (9.12).   Faculty who meet the following criteria will be designated as graduate faculty, be eligible to serve on the graduate committee, and have voting privileges in plenary meetings. Graduate faculty will annually be designated by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, and each of the Collegiate Deans.   Designated Graduate Faculty must meet 2 of the 3 following criteria:
  • Graduate faculty must hold a terminal degree in an appropriate field of study or at minimum a master’s degree or clinical specialization in an appropriate field of study plus significant professional experience (10,000 hours minimum).
  • Graduate faculty will teach graduate level courses on a regular basis or be administratively responsible for an approved graduate program (see FH 9.21).
  • Graduate faculty must be active in research appropriate to the field or discipline. Documentation of research should be submitted to the Graduate School annually.
  Graduate Faculty should meet the following criteria in an ongoing manner:
  • Graduate faculty must be active in research appropriate to the field or discipline.
  • Graduate faculty must have significant professional experience related to degree program or courses of study.
  • Faculty will possess appropriate current experience in graduate level teaching.
  • Graduate faculty must advise graduate students and be willing to serve on graduate student capstone committees.
  • Graduate faculty may serve as members of the graduate Policies Committee.
  Principles of Graduate Study. Coursework at the graduate level is not just different classes than the undergraduate. It is not simply more information on a particular topic. It is designed to be a qualitatively different experience. Concordia University has accepted these principles as the practical ways graduate education will be delivered at Concordia (9.13).   Changing Graduate Curricular Requirements.  Procedures for changing a course, modifying the graduate core, graduate certificate, graduate program or program emphasis.  Please consult the approval process for each (9.14).       Program Integrity and Responsibility to Graduate Policy.   The Graduate Program Department Chair/Coordinator is responsible for:
  • The content of the learning outcomes and curriculum for the graduate programs in their respective areas.
  • For knowing, understanding, and implementing approved Graduate policies and procedures.
  • For demonstrating to the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) how programs meet Graduate policies and procedures. The AVP-GS reports specifically how each program is responding to the approved graduate policies, procedures and initiatives to the Graduate Policies Committee.
Procedures for programs failing to meet approved policies, procedures, and initiatives are described (9.15).   Degrees Offered.  This list of approved programs is updated annually (9.21).   Annual Assessment.  Graduate programs of the university will be assessed annually. Program directors, department chairs, or emphasis coordinators will be responsible for the implementation of assessment plans.  [Assessment plans are to be submitted in June, each academic year] (9.22).   Accreditation. [updates pending] (9.23)
  1. Higher Learning Commission (HLC).
  2. National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (CAEP).
  3. Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).
  4. National Council on Family Relations (NCFR).
  5. Minnesota State Board of Teaching (BOT).
  6. Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).
  7. National Commission on Orthotic and Prosthetic Education (NCOPE) & Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).
  Proposals for New Courses, Emphases, Certificates, Programs or Degrees [updates pending]. All new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should demonstrate an affirmative response to the following questions (9.24).   5 gates for consideration of new academic programs
  1. Is there a market for the new program?
  2. Do we have the capacity to deliver?
  3. If we don’t have the internal capacity, who is our external partner?
  4. How does it fit with university mission, vision, and promise?
  5. Will it contribute to the revenue stream of the University?
  Proposers for new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should consult with the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies in preparation for the written proposal.  The general outline for the proposal is listed below.  In addition, proposers should follow the “calendar steps” leading to approval of the proposal.   Introducing a new proposal
  • The new proposal shall support the mission of the university.
  • University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the new proposal.
  • New proposals shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, associate vice-president for graduate studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review.
  • The new proposal should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome project. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee.
  Admission to Program.  Admission criteria are outlined for the master’s, educational specialists, doctorate of physical therapy, and the educational doctorate degrees (9.32).   Enrollment by CSP Faculty and Staff.  Parameters for enrollment are outlined. (9.33).   International Students.  International students must provide proof of English proficiency (if English is not the student’s first language). The policy outlines how proficiency can be established (9.34).   Undergraduate Admission to Graduate Courses.  Normally undergraduate students are not permitted to enroll in graduate courses without being admitted to the graduate program (9.35).   Transfer Credit.  (9.37)
  1. Up to 6 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the MA (MS). The credits must be appropriate to the student’s program and the course(s) must be equivalent to the course(s) in the program (i.e. outcomes (objectives) need to match). Application for transfer of credit is made by the student to the Advisor. The credits must be certified by the Registrar and approved for the degree program by the program director.
  2. Up to 9 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the Ed.S.
  3. Up to 12 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the Ed.D.
  4. Normally no credits will be accepted for transfer into the DPT program.
  5. Only courses with a grade of B or better may be accepted for transfer credit.
  6. Normally credits older than five years will not be accepted.
  7. The chair of the graduate program or designee will make the determination whether a student is required to audit a course in place of taking the course for a grade.
  8. Students taking graduate level courses as part of a Concordia University St. Paul graduate certificate, approved by the Graduate Policies Committee, may apply the entire graduate certificate’s credits to the graduate program to which it is connected.
  9. Specific programs and/or departments may establish institutional articulation agreements with other accredited institutions. Proposals outlining such agreements should be presented to the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, who will report such to the Graduate Policies Committee prior to approval.
  Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) Policy for Graduate Students.  To achieve satisfactory academic progress, a graduate student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade – point average (CGPA) and complete a minimum cumulative of 67% of all attempted graduate level coursework. Incompletes (I) and withdrawals (W) do not count toward completion.  When a student does not maintain satisfactory progress, the University will impose certain restrictions that will affect the student’s eligibility for enrollment (Academic Probation; Academic Disqualification).  A description of these restrictions, along with the Disqualification Appeal Process can be found in the policy (9.41).   Attendance Policies. The Graduate School assumes that all registered students have freely accepted personal responsibility for regular class attendance. Students are expected to attend all class meetings and laboratory sessions for the courses in which they are enrolled. In cases of emergencies and/or unforeseen circumstances students are expected to notify their instructors and arrange for any possible “makeup” assignments; however, instructors are not required to allow for such “makeup” assignments.   All graduate programs/courses will have a stated attendance policy included in each syllabus. (9.42)   Additional attendance guidelines and requirements for graduate students:  
  • While it is the student’s responsibility to communicate with the instructor regarding an absence, if the instructor has not heard from the student, and the student is not participating, the instructor should attempt to contact the student and the program’s academic advisor.
  • If a student must miss a class/chat because of an emergency or illness, he/she is required to contact the professor in order to identify and complete his/her regular assignment(s) and complete a make-up assignment that contributes to the subject being studied and enhances the class-learning environment.
  • A missed class/chat may be made up for partial credit.
  • If a student misses two classes/chats, the instructor and the student need to discuss the student’s ability to complete the course. In addition, the student will be required to complete his/her regular assignment(s) and extra work. Specific procedures should be outlined in the syllabus.
  • Any additional absences will require retaking the course. The student will be billed and a grade will be issued each time the course is taken.
  • Regular attendance is a key factor in determining the continuing financial aid support. Attendance will be used to calculate the amount of aid to be returned if a student used Financial Aid (Title IV) and student discontinues enrollment or withdraws.
  • Instructors understand the uncertainty of military requirements and other contractual obligations, and they will work with the student to meet educational goals.
  • It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to make appropriate arrangements.
  • All Chats and/or Web Ex sessions will be recorded as part of Financial Aid (Title IV) requirement to verify the last date of attendance.
  • Students with short or long term disability concerns that may affect attendance should register with Student Accessibility Services. However, course participation is essential to courses and generally expected in accordance with this policy.
  Program Requirements.  (9.43)
  1. A master’s degree graduate degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 30 semester credits with a grade – point average of 3.00 or better. All master’s students must pass their Capstone at 80% or higher.
  2. A Doctor of Physical Therapy degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 100 semester credits beyond a bachelor’s degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or better.
  3. An Educational Specialist degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 30 semester credits beyond a master’s degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or better.
  4. An Educational Doctorate degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 60 semester credits beyond a master’s degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or better.
  5. All post – graduate students must meet the approval of their Capstone or Dissertation committee.
  Adviser and Committee (9.44)
  1. Adviser. All students will be assigned an advisor. All students shall receive academic advice from a graduate CSP faculty person.
  2. Committee. A student’s committee shall consist of a committee chair and one or two readers approved by the program director. The chair of the committee shall be CSP graduate faculty. Exceptions shall be approved by the program director.
  Grading. Grade reports are available online at the end of each course.  Conceptual Grading Standards for all programs in the Graduate School, In-Progress Grades, Repeating a Course, Withdrawing, Changing or Appealing a Grade After It Has Been Issued, and procedures for Appealing a Grade are detailed in the policy (9.45).   Time Limits. (9.46)
  1. Master’s degree programs must be completed within five years of the beginning of the first course.
  2. Ed.S. degree programs must be completed within six years of the beginning of the first course.
  3. Ed.D. degree programs must be completed within seven years of the beginning of the first course.
  4. DPT degree programs must be completed within four years of the beginning of the first course.
  Appeal of Policy and Procedure. (9.47) Steps for making an appeal (re-admission, grade course change, or academic integrity).
  1. Student submits completed Appeal of Academic Dishonesty Graduate Form to the Dean’s Office.
  2. The Dean reviews the form and determines if appeal should be granted based on stated reason for appeal.
    1. If Request for Appeal is denied, the Dean will email the student with reason for denial.
    2. If Request` for Appeal is approved, the Dean will email the student and follow-up.
  3. If denied, the student may appeal the decision to the Graduate Appeals Committee.
    1. Submit appeal to the Associate Vice-President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) for consideration by the Graduate Academic Appeals Committee.
    2. If Request for Appeal is denied, the AVP-GS will email the student with reason for denial.
    3. If Request for Appeal is approved, the AVP-GS will email the student and follow-up.
  4. Final Appeal Option
    1. If denied, the student may appeal a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If appeal is denied, the student can appeal the decision a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
    2. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will review the case and email the student of decision and reason.
    3. No further appeals are allowed after this decision.
  University and Program Requirements. Students must complete all requirements as specified by the University and Program (9.51).   Date for Transcripts and Diploma. Transcripts and diplomas will reflect the degree awarded and the term date during which all academic work was completed (9.52).   Completion of Requirements.  Candidates who complete all course requirements within 30 calendar days following the end of a regular academic term at Concordia University are listed as graduates of that term.  Degree requirements are completed when all grades for course have been filed and recorded by the Registrar (9.53)   Commencement. Students will be invited to participate in the annual commencement ceremony in May providing all course work will be completed by the forthcoming September.  Students who are unable to participate in the May ceremony may graduate in absentia (9.54).   Research with Human Subjects (9.62).  
  1. Ethical and policy issues in research involving human participants are grounded in Concordia University, St. Paul’s mission in the enlightened care of God’s creation and the safeguarding of human participants in all research under which the University is a part. The University will comply with all federal regulations requiring the establishment and operation of an Institutional Review Board for the protection of human participants.
 
  1. All research that can be defined as “a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge” (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services – 45 CFR 46) must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Participants (IRB).
 
  1. IRB review is also required of research carried out under the sponsorship of an institution other than Concordia University, St. Paul, but which is performed on the premises of Concordia University, St. Paul, even if the research has already been approved by the IRB at the sponsoring institution or elsewhere.
 
  1. Students and Faculty who are planning to conduct research are directed to use and follow FHB Section 8, Appendix D: Concordia University Saint Paul, MN Protocols and Procedures for Research Involving Human Subjects Application and Information Packet and Appendix E: Protocol Form Research Involving Human Subjects.
 
  1. Faculty and student researchers must successfully complete Human Subjects training through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program prior to submitting protocol forms for IRB review. All researchers must maintain valid (non-expired) certification of CITI training. The CITI certification is good for three (3) years from date of successful completion.
  Release of Student Information.  Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Concordia University defines the following information as directory information: the student’s name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and teams, dates of attendance, degree and awards received, and the most recent educational institution attended by the student. This information may be released unless the student notifies the Registrar of a specific hold (9.63).   Textbook Selection. Graduate course texts will be approved by the program chair (9.64).   Faculty Communication with Graduate Students. Graduate faculty will be available for student contact by personal appointment, phone consultation, or email interaction. All student requests for a response shall be honored in a timely manner (9.65).   Academic Integrity for Graduate Students (9.66).  Academic integrity is essential to any academic institution and is in keeping with the mission of Concordia University. In order to protect the rights of students, the disciplinary procedure for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty follows these broad guidelines. Violations of academic integrity include “cheating” and “plagiarism” as defined by the university’s Graduate Student Code of Conduct.   The procedures for implementing academic integrity policies including following due process are detailed in the policy.  See procedure for appeals in (9.47)   Dissertation Fees.  Students enrolled in the Educational Doctorate degree program must pay an additional fee to cover the costs of the dissertation committee members and editing of the dissertation. The fee will be made known to the student at the time of acceptance into the program (9.70).

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UNIVERSITY CLOSINGS
The personal safety of students, faculty and staff is vital to the Concordia University. While Concordia University expects that individuals make a good faith effort to travel to campus during inclement weather conditions if the university is operating and does not declare an emergency closing, it is also important for individuals to use their own discretion in determining whether it is safe for them to travel to campus.  
  1. On rare occasions when weather has been determined to pose a potential threat to the life or safety of students, staff, and faculty, the decision to close the university will be made using these guidelines:
  2. By 7:00 a.m. decisions regarding closing and cancellation or delay of day classes will be made.
  3. By 11:00 am decisions regarding cancellation of afternoon classes will be made
  4. By 2:00 p.m. decisions regarding cancellation of face-to-face evening classes or University sponsored evening events will be made.
  5. Notices regarding closings, cancellations or delays will be immediately posted on the Concordia University Campus Portal web page. This should be used as the primary resource for students, staff and faculty, since detailed will be included in this location.
  6. Cohort-based online classes are canceled on a class-by-class basis.
  7. The university will notify local media stations (including KARE channel 11; WCCO channel 4; KSTP channel 5 as well as WCCO Radio (AM830) and KTIS Radio (FM 98.5FM) regarding closings or cancellations. Please be reminded that we cannot control how rapidly these media locations update their announcements.
  8. Use the E2 campus notification that is available for text message announcements. Sign up at http://concordia.csp.edu/Security/E2Campus/Index%20Page.html


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V. COMMENCEMENT (FH 9.54)
  • Students will be invited to participate in the annual commencement ceremony in May providing all course work will be completed by the forthcoming September.
  • Students who are unable to participate in the May ceremony may graduate in
absentia.
  • The graduation/capstone fee will be assessed regardless of participation in the
graduation ceremony.

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U. COMPLETION OF REQUIREMENTS (FH 9.53)
  • Candidates who complete all course requirements within 30 calendar days following the end of a regular academic term at Concordia University are listed as graduates of that term.
  • Degree requirements are completed when all grades for courses have been filed and recorded by the Registrar.


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T. LEAVE OF ABSENCE/UNIVERSITY WITHDRAWAL
A University Withdrawal form should be completed if a student is planning to take one or more semesters off from their studies. In the section indicating the reason for withdrawal, select the term you would like to resume your studies in the drop-down box on the form.

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S. REFUND PROCEDURE
You have until the day before the start of the sixth day of the term to drop a course without record or charge.  After that deadline you will receive no refund and a “W” grade will be recorded for the course.

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R. REGISTRATION PROCESS
You will register for your classes online through CSP Connect.  The deadline for adding a course is the day before the start of the part of term.  However, it is highly recommended that you register for your classes no later than 1 week prior to the start of the part of term to assure your access to Blackboard and a smooth transition into the course.  The deadline for dropping a course without record or charge is before the start of the sixth day of the part of term.  The deadline for dropping a course and receiving a “W” grade is before the start of the sixth week of the part of term.  These dates for each term will be posted on CSP Connect.  Any late adds or drops will require a Registration Restriction form accompanied by a general petition, processed through your academic adviser.  If you are dropping your last or only course in a term you will need to contact your academic adviser for assistance.

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Q. FINANCIAL HOLDS
If you are not current in your payments to Concordia University (on an approved payment plan) or have an unpaid balance on your student account, you may be placed on financial hold. While you are on financial hold:  
  • You will not be allowed to register for the next term.  If you have already pre-registered for a term and have an outstanding balance from the previous term you will be dropped from your classes and your access to Blackboard will be disabled.
  • Your unpaid balance is subject to finance charges or late fees.
  • Since you are not registered, financial aid for the next term will be canceled.
  • If you do not register for the upcoming term, your student loans will lose current in-school deferment and may go into repayment status.
  • You will be responsible for payment of all costs associated with the collection of your unpaid balance, including finance charges, collections fees, and attorney‘s fees.
  • You will not receive any transcripts or diploma.
  • If you are a veteran, your benefits will be discontinued.
  • You will not be retroactively registered for any course missed. You will need to contact your academic adviser to make up missed courses.


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P. APPEAL OF POLICY AND PROCEDURE (FH 9.47)
The Graduate Appeals Committee Appointed by the Associate Vice President (AVP) for Graduate Studies, the Graduate Appeals Committee will hear the appeal and review all relevant documents.  The AVP may request additional documentation from the student and/or other departments within the University. The Graduate Appeals Committee will consist of the AVP for Graduate Studies, the registrar, the AVP for Graduate Enrollment, a member from the Graduate Policies Committee, and a Collegiate Dean. This committee will review all academic disqualification appeals for graduate students.
  1. Graduate students may appeal decisions made by program faculty or
administrators regarding disqualification, re-admission, grade change, or academic integrity regarding entry into a program, continuation in a program, or questions that may arise as a result of a candidate’s academic performance in a program.
  1. Steps for making an appeal (re-admission, grade course change, or academic
integrity).
  1. Student submits completed Appeal of Academic Dishonesty Graduate Form to the Dean’s Office.
  2. The Dean reviews the form and determines if appeal should be granted based on stated reason for appeal.
    1. If Request for Appeal is denied, the Dean will email the student with reason for denial.
    2. If Request` for Appeal is approved, the Dean will email the student and follow-up.
  3. If denied, the student may appeal the decision to the Graduate Appeals Committee.
    1. Submit appeal to the Associate Vice-President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) for consideration by the Graduate Academic Appeals Committee.
    2. If Request for Appeal is denied, the AVP-GS will email the student with reason for denial.
    3. If Request for Appeal is approved, the AVP-GS will email the student and follow-up.
  4. Final Appeal Option
    1. If denied, the student may appeal a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If appeal is denied, the student can appeal the decision a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
    2. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will review the case and email the student of decision and reason.
    3. No further appeals are allowed after this decision.


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O. SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (FH 9.41)
To achieve satisfactory academic progress, a graduate student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average (CGPA) and complete a minimum cumulative of 67% of all attempted graduate level coursework. Incompletes (I) and withdrawals (W) do not count toward completion.

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Graduate Academic Appeals Committee (FH 9.45)
The Graduate Policies Committee serves as a group of faculty and administrators to hear student academic and non-academic appeals. If students believe an academic or non-academic action has been taken, the student may follow the appeal procedures outlined in FH policies 9.47 and 9.66.

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Grade Appeal (FH 9.45)
The appeal of a grade must follow the appeals process found in FH 9.47.

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Changing or Appealing a Grade After It Has Been Issued (FH 9.45)
Errors in recording or miscalculation must be changed no later than the end of the semester following the error. Grade changes must have accompanying documentation and be approved by the Department or Program Chair and the Dean of the College in which the program resides. Students who wish to appeal a final grade will follow the procedures found in FH 9.47. The appeal must be initiated no later than 5 university business days after grades are officially posted by the registrar’s office.

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Repeating a Course (FH 9.45)
A student may repeat a course in which a grade of C, D, N or F has been earned upon approval by the program director and the college dean.  While all grades remain on the student’s academic record and transcript, only the highest grade awarded will be used in calculating the student’s grade point average.

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N. Grading System (FH 9.45)
The following scale is used in evaluating a student’s work: A     Superior   4.00 B     Good                   3.00 C     Fair                      2.00 F     Failure                 0.00 I      In-Progress – A student not completing required coursework before the end of a course may, at the discretion of the instructor, receive an “in –progress” (I) grade for the course.  The student must complete an “In-Progress Request Form” and have it approved by the course instructor and the Program Director or Chair. W    Withdraw – A student may request the grade of “W” before a course is 80% complete, based upon the course calendar.  If the course is more than 80% complete, the student’s grade is calculated based upon graded components stated in the syllabus. P     Pass (not included in grade point calculations) N     No-pass (not included in grade point calculations)

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M. GRADE POSTING
Grades are generally processed by noon one week after the course concludes.  You may check your CSP Connect account for these grades one to two weeks after a course has completed.  Students are responsible for monitoring their grades and academic status.

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L. CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICIES (FH 9.42)
The Graduate School assumes that all registered students have freely accepted personal responsibility for regular class attendance. Students are expected to attend all class meetings and laboratory sessions for the courses in which they are enrolled. In cases of emergencies and/or unforeseen circumstances students are expected to notify their instructors and arrange for any possible “makeup” assignments; however, instructors are not required to allow for such “makeup” assignments. All graduate programs/courses will have a stated attendance policy included in each syllabus. Additional attendance guidelines and requirements for graduate students:
  • While it is the student’s responsibility to communicate with the instructor regarding an absence, if the instructor has not heard from the student, and the student is not participating, the instructor should attempt to contact the student and the program’s academic advisor.
  • If a student must miss a class/chat because of an emergency or illness, he/she is required to contact the professor in order to identify and complete his/her regular assignment(s) and complete a make-up assignment that contributes to the subject being studied and enhances the class-learning environment. A missed class/chat may result in a grade reduction.
  • A missed class/chat may be made up for partial credit.
  • If a student misses two classes/chats, the instructor and the student need to discuss the student’s ability to complete the course. In addition, the student will be required to complete his/her regular assignment(s) and extra work. Specific procedures should be outlined in the syllabus.
  • Any additional absences will require retaking the course. The student will be billed and a grade will be issued each time the course is taken.
  • Regular attendance is a key factor in determining the continuing financial aid support. Attendance will be used to calculate the amount of aid to be returned if a student used Financial Aid (Title IV) and student discontinues enrollment or withdraws.
  • Instructors understand the uncertainty of military requirements and other contractual obligations, and they will work with the student to meet educational goals.
  • It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to make appropriate arrangements.
  • All Chats and/or Web Ex sessions will be recorded as part of Financial Aid (Title IV) requirement to verify the last date of attendance.
  • Students with short or long term disability concerns that may affect attendance should register with Student Accessibility Services. However, course participation is essential to courses and generally expected in accordance with this policy.


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K. Graduate Student Academic Reporting Form
All incidents related to the following issues are to be reported by graduate faculty at the following link: https://publicdocs.maxient.com/reportingform.php?ConcordiaUnivStPaul&layout_id=3 This information is immediately available to the Associate Vice President of Graduate Studies and may be shared with the department chair at the dean’s discretion. [This form is available on CSP Connect – Faculty Resources tab]   Academic Integrity for Graduate Students (FH 9.66)  
  1. Definition of Terms
 
  1. Academic integrity is essential to any academic institution and is in keeping with the mission of Concordia University. In order to protect the rights of students, the disciplinary procedure for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty follows these broad guidelines. Violations of academic integrity include “cheating” and “plagiarism” as defined by the university’s Student Code of Conduct (SCC).
 
  1. The term “cheating” includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; (2) dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; (3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the University faculty or staff; or (4) academic deception (e.g. fabricating data, misrepresenting sources, misleading presentations, lying) in written or oral form.
 
  1. The term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials.
 
  1. The term “recycling” may be new to some. Instructors expect that work submitted in a course is original work done for that course. These are two examples of recycling:
  • Submitting your own work, which has been submitted and graded for an earlier course, for a second course.
  • Submitting your own published work as original work for a course.
 
  1. Implementation of Academic Integrity Policies
 
  1. The instructor will gather and document all evidence of academic dishonesty in a clear and concise manner. The instructor will complete a Graduate Student Academic Report following an initial discussion with the student. The report should assist in clarifying root issues.
 
  1. The instructor will present this evidence to the student. The instructor will notify the student in writing that this has been done and will indicate the Dean of the College will provide information for the appeal process.
 
  1. The instructor may prescribe academic penalties, including but not restricted to, the requirement of additional work, an assignment of a failing grade on the work in question, or a failing grade for the entire course. Any prescribed penalties must be in writing and include instructions for the appeal process. These should be documented through the Graduate Student Academic Report.
 
  1. If this is a repeated occurrence, the Department Chair may impose additional penalties, including but not limited to dismissal from the departmental program, suspension from the university, or expulsion from the university.
 
  1. A student has the right to appeal the academic penalties imposed by the instructor by filing an appeal with the Collegiate Dean within 3 university business days of the documented imposition of penalties. A response regarding the appeal is normally received within 15 university business days.
 
  1. Steps for Appeal Regarding Academic Dishonesty can be found in the Faculty Handbook, 9.47.


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H. Codes of Conduct (Student and Faculty)
Graduate Student Code of Conduct Concordia is recognized for educating students who are prepared to become responsible leaders in their respective disciplines. An effective learning environment where students and faculty value integrity, professionalism and diligence provides a foundation for achieving our mission. To that end, Concordia graduate students are expected to live out this mission in the following areas. Professionalism
  • Exhibiting classroom behavior (email, dress, etc.) that is personally and professionally respectful to faculty and fellow students will lay a foundation for effective learning.
  • Being dependable and arriving to class on time (and not leaving early) will foster healthy team norms.
  • Remaining current with assigned readings and completing assignments on time will foster a sense of learning and minimize student and faculty stress.
Honesty
  • Being the sole author of your work is vital; to that end, be sure to cite provide references and sources in your submissions.
  • Sharing personal and professional experiences is paramount to shared learning; however, remember that conversations in the course room should remain confidential.
  • Submitting ‘the same’ assignment in more than one course is not good practice for ongoing professional development; you must complete unique work for each deliverable throughout your program.
Respect
  • Refraining from the use of phones and other electronic equipment during class gives everyone the opportunity to give full attention to others and the instructor.
  • Respecting the university’s staff and being responsible stewards of its facilities creates a collaborative and pleasant environment for learning.
  • Going above and beyond minimum expectations helps to develop a culture of learning and high performance.
Collegiality
  • Being open to new thoughts, ideas, and people creates a welcoming environment and fosters a sense of creativity.
  • Holding oneself accountable and contributing fully to team assignments develops a sense of team spirit and unity.
  • Challenging others, celebrating achievements, and being encouraging, patient, and helpful fosters an inspiring learning environment.
  • The potential for conflict is a natural part of human interaction; however, it is important that we share such concerns with candor and remain respectful, confidential, and professional.
  Cohort Procedures – Department Chairs or Program Directors may operationalize the above constructs (Professionalism, Honesty, Respect, and Collegiality) in specific terms as they apply to their program of study.  
  1. Course Feedback Form
Near the conclusion of each course, Concordia Information Technology will send a message to your CSP email with instructions for completing the end of course feedback form.

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G. Research with Human Subjects (FH 9.62)
  1. Ethical and policy issues in research involving human participants are grounded in Concordia University, St. Paul’s mission in the enlightened care of God’s creation and the safeguarding of human participants in all research under which the University is a part. The University will comply with all federal regulations requiring the establishment and operation of an Institutional Review Board for the protection of human participants.
  2. All research that can be defined as “a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge” (S. Department of Health & Human Services – 45 CFR 46) must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Participants (IRB).
  3. IRB review is also required of research carried out under the sponsorship of an institution other than Concordia University, St. Paul, but which is performed on the premises of Concordia University, St. Paul, even if the research has already been approved by the IRB at the sponsoring institution or elsewhere.
  4. Students and Faculty who are planning to conduct research are directed to use and follow FHB Section 8, Appendix D: Concordia University Saint Paul, MN Protocols and Procedures for Research Involving Human Subjects Application and Information Packet and Appendix E: Protocol Form Research Involving Human Subjects.
  5. Faculty and student researchers must successfully complete Human Subjects training through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program prior to submitting protocol forms for IRB review.  All researchers must maintain valid (non-expired) certification of CITI training. The CITI certification is good for three (3) years from date of successful completion.
  Program coordinators and/or instructors will help facilitate the Human Subjects Protocol procedures with students.  The student’s faculty (Principle Investigator) mentor will submit the application through the IRB procedure.

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F. Accreditation
Higher Learning Commission (HLC), re-accreditation granted in 2008.
  1. National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (CAEP) re-accreditation granted in 2008.
iii.       National Council on Family Relations (NCFR), BA in Family Science re-accreditation granted in 2014. MA in Family Science re-accreditation granted in 2010.
  1. Minnesota State Board of Teaching re-approval granted in 2008.
  2. Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) granted re-certification for BA and MA in Human Resource Management in 2014.
  3. National Commission on Orthotic and Prosthetic Education (NCOPE) provides an accreditation recommendation to the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP).  The accreditation is granted through 2024.
vii.  Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP) on behalf of the National Commission on Orthotic and Prosthetic Education (NCOPE) granted continuing accreditation to the MS in Orthotics and Prosthetics in 2014. Accreditation is granted through 2024. viii. Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) provides candidacy for the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program.  Concordia is a candidate for Accreditation, a pre-accreditation status of affiliation with CAPTE.

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Graduate School Student Outcomes
  1. Synthesize theoretical and research concepts from multiple perspectives to inform inquiry and practice.
    1. Foster creativity – transition to meet the new world through practitioner and applied methods.
    2. Develop cognitive & methodological flexibility and adaptability.
    3. Encourage resilience in the face of impasses (in the environment).
    4. Actively contribute to the body of knowledge.
    5. Demonstrate and apply knowledge as a reflective practitioner.
 
  1. Formulate creative responses to complex issues through critical analysis.
    1. We have the “notion” to change the world through our graduate work capstones.
    2. Through our graduate work, we strive toward “impact,” modeling good research and problem-solving.
    3. Connect with meaningful internships and/or clinical practice opportunities that demonstrate our commitment to the research practitioner’s model.
    4. We will document the impact of our capstones, projects, or theses on organizations, corporations, community, and society.
    5. Organizations and the people they serve do better as a result of our student’s work with them.
    6. Is this true?
 
  1. Model ethical and professional behaviors to guide inquiry and practice in a global and diverse society.
    1. Exemplify Christian service within their organizations and communities.
    2. A sense of professionalism.
    3. Communicate respectfully and effectively.
    4. Pursue opportunity from a sense of Christian vocation.
    5. Demonstrate and encourage lifelong learning.
 
  • Consult the specific Program Handbook Supplement for program outcomes.


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E. Principles of Graduate Study and Graduate School Student Outcomes
Principles of Graduate Study Graduate Education is designed to be a qualitatively different experience from undergraduate education. Coursework at the graduate level is not just different classes than at the undergraduate level, nor is it simply more information on a particular topic. The following principles serve as the practical styles and approaches through which graduate education is delivered at Concordia University St. Paul.  
  1. Graduate coursework is more creative. Students learn to create systems of thinking and acting that will help them to be more effective professionals.
  2. Graduate coursework is more self-directed. Students often decide how to fashion an assignment to help them apply and synthesize the material more appropriately.
  3. Graduate coursework is more rigorous. More is expected of the graduate student (in the way of research, thought and productivity) than of the certificate or undergraduate student.
  4. Graduate coursework is more attentive to epistemological issues. More attention is given to “how we know what we know,” and to how we prove and support what we know. Skills of discernment and critical thinking are developed deliberately.
  5. Graduate coursework is more attentive to research. Students will be exploring (and conducting) new research. They will read, critique, and may contribute to original research.
  6. Graduate coursework is more a community of learners, than merely a teacher-student relationship. Graduate students are assumed to have reached an intellectual maturity that puts them at a place where the role of the instructor is different. Instructors do not have to spoon-feed or hand-hold; instructors need to guide and mentor the mature student in the direction that the student has identified.  Problem-based and/or team-based pedagogies may be used.
  7. Graduate learning is not just remembering information, it is constructing knowledge. As they engage, the community of learners opens new insights and creates new knowledge in the field.
  8. Graduate students give careful consideration to information skills and bibliographic references. The skills of knowledge navigation will be increasingly important in the years ahead, and graduate students learn how to find the knowledge they need.
  9. Graduate professors actively participate in research, professional engagement, and learning. This helps them maintain a cutting edge in their profession and bring the most up-to-date information to their students.
  “It is the role of graduate education to explore and advance the limits of knowledge and to define the state of the art in every field.  Its purpose is to serve society’s needs in specific technical and professional ways, but also to serve the need for intellectual expansion.  Graduate education is a major source of future intellectual leaders of society…”   Adapted from Organization and Administration of Graduate Education: A Policy Statement, Council of Graduate Schools

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D. Graduate School Mission
The mission of the Graduate School at Concordia University St. Paul is to define and support excellence in graduate education and the research and scholarly activities associated with it.

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C. University Promise
Concordia University, St. Paul empowers you to discover and engage your purpose for life, career and service in a dynamic, multicultural, urban environment where Christ is honored, all are welcome, and Lutheran convictions inform intellectual inquiry and academic pursuits.

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B. University Mission
The mission of Concordia University, a university of the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod is to prepare students for thoughtful and informed living, for dedicated service to God and humanity, and for the enlightened care of God’s creation, all within the context of the Christian Gospel.

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Graduate School Policies and Procedures Handbook 2017-18
The policies included in this handbook are administered through the Graduate School and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies.    
  1. Introduction: President’s Welcome
  Welcome to Concordia University, St. Paul!   Concordia University seeks to serve God and our global community by preparing students for thoughtful and informed living, dedicated service to God and humanity and enlightened care of God’s creation, all within the context of the Christian Gospel. Our alumni consistently tell us that we empowered them to succeed in their academic work, discover a great deal about their own sense of vocation, and prepare for their chosen career field with relevant knowledge, skills and attitudes. Located in the heart of the City of St. Paul, we are committed to our urban community, with its rich racial, ethnic, and multicultural character. Furthermore we honor Jesus Christ as Lord, while at the same time welcoming individuals from many faith traditions to our campus and online cohorts. Our highly educated, trained, and caring faculty and staff offer their knowledge, disciplined research methodology, listening ears and hearts, and Christian values to each student program wide.   Recently, Concordia became known as one of the most affordable private higher education options in the United States by reducing tuition for its traditional undergraduate students by $10,000, while maintaining our already competitive pricing for adult-undergraduate and graduate programs. The result has been extraordinary growth in enrollments across the entire University. I encourage you to join us in your educational leadership roles in your home communities and expand the circle of student success wherever you serve. We are here to help you achieve your educational and vocational goals and to that end celebrate your success as well. Rev. Tom Ries

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Grad Student Policy #1
This is an important policy

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