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Student Education: Internships, Grading, Credits, Registrar

6.60 STUDENT INTERNSHIP CREDIT POLICY
1) Definitions: a) An internship is a planned and supervised field-based educational experience for which a student receives academic credit. b) A University Supervisor is a Concordia University, St. Paul faculty member assigned by the academic department to supervise a given internship. c) An On-Site Supervisor is a member of the internship organization who supervises the student intern and completes required evaluation forms of the student intern. 2) Academic Credit: a) For each internship credit, the student is required to document 35 hours of work for the internship. b) The number of credits earned is determined by the academic department, faculty adviser, and the student intern. c) No more than one-third of a major or minor may consist of internship credits. No more than 12 internship credits may be applied toward the minimum credits required for a Bachelor’s degree unless students are completing two or more majors or a major and a minor, not to exceed 18 credits total. d) Grades are assigned by the University Supervisor after evaluation forms and other required work are completed, within the grading deadlines set for that term. Extensions for incomplete work must be approved following the In Progress Grade policy. e) Internships are graded on a Pass/No-Pass basis. 3) Academic departments or faculty are responsible for: a) Approving internship experiences. b) Providing a University Supervisor to evaluate and grade the student intern’s performance. c) Collecting the student intern’s internship location and On-Site Supervisor contact information. d) Regular contact with on-site supervisor in accordance with the requirements of the internship. e) Setting appropriate standards for student intern preparation and performance. f) Requiring a mid-term and final evaluation to be completed by the On-Site Supervisor and submitted to the University Supervisor.

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6.62 INDEPENDENT STUDY
A. Definition: An independent study is an educational experience offered for credit outside the regularly scheduled classes. Instructors are responsible for the academic soundness of the independent study proposal and its implementation. The dean of each college in consultation with the registrar may designate low enrollment courses as independent studies. B. Criteria: 1. Eligibility for independent study is limited to students in good standing. 2. Acceptable criteria for approval to register for independent study shall be to schedule conflicts of existing courses, advanced study, or enrichment. Existing courses may be taken only if there are insurmountable schedule problems which might delay a student’s graduation. 3. For existing courses, the approved course syllabus shall be followed. For instructor/student- designed courses, objectives, learning experiences, expectations, and evaluation methods shall be written. 4. The independent study may be planned to extend up to one year of continuous registration. 5. Each credit hour represents approximately 35 clock hours of student work, including meetings with the instructor. 6. Students are normally limited to four semester hours of independent study per semester. A maximum of sixteen hours may apply towards graduation requirements. 7. Registration for independent study shall normally occur when students register for their next semester’s classes. Completed forms are due no later than the end of the second week of classes in the term. 8. Independent studies should be identified for registration by the departmental prefix followed by 488. C. Administration 1. A number of 488 prefixed by course letters (i.e., HIS-488, ENG 488, etc.) shall be used to designate independent study courses unless a standard course number already exists. 2. The dean of each college is responsible for interpreting the independent study policy and approving any exceptions. 3. The dean of each college is responsible for assigning service load credit to independent studies. 4. Ordinarily, each student shall be equated on the workload as follows: 1 course credit = .1 faculty load credit 2 course credits = .2 faculty load credit 3 course credits = .3 faculty load credit 4 course credits = .4 faculty load credit 5 course credits = .5 faculty load credit 6 course credits = .6 faculty load credit

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6.63 TRANSFER CREDIT: THE GRANTING OF CREDIT FOR NON-CONCORDIA WORK
A. Definition: Credit refers to transcript recognition of work toward a degree. B. Responsibility: The registrar is responsible for evaluating all requests for credit and may seek assistance in this evaluation. C. Basic Principles and Guidelines: 1. All credit granted must be for educational activities that conform to the University’s mission, curricula, and standards for student achievement. 2. Credit transferred from other educational institutions will be considered in the light of a. the educational quality of the institution from which the student transfers; b. the comparability of the nature, content, and level of credit earned to that offered at Concordia; and c. the appropriateness and applicability of the credit earned to the programs offered by Concordia in the light of the student’s educational goals. 3. Experiences offered for extra-institutional credit must be articulated, documented, and measured in terms of the student’s program of study and the university’s graduation requirements. 4. The score on tests of educational activities submitted for credit must meet the standards of Concordia. (Guidelines are available from the Office of the Registrar.) 5. Credits for non-Concordia work may be appropriate and accepted but may not be applicable because they exceed the credit requirements for graduation at Concordia or are not applicable to any category of Concordia’s requirements. 6. Credit for non-Concordia work is accepted up to a maximum of 90 credits allowing for the 30 credit residency requirement necessary to earn a degree at Concordia. 7. Transfer students who have completed the Minnesota transfer curriculum or an associate of arts degree from an accredited institution are considered to have met Concordia’s general education requirements with the exception of the theology requirement which must be completed at Concordia. 8. Credits earned as part of a study abroad experience at a foreign institution approved through the CALL Center will be entered as “Pass” grades and do not count in GPA calculation. Students must earn a “C-” or higher to earn credit. Grades earned in Concordia University courses taught abroad will be figured into the student’s GPA. D. Standards: The principles and guidelines set forth by the following organizations are followed. These principles and guidelines are modified where appropriate to coincide with Concordia’s principles, specifications, and guidelines as noted elsewhere in this policy. Higher Learning Commission (HLC) Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) Council on Advancement of Experiential Learning (CAEL) National College Credit Recommendation Service (NCCRS) National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) American Council on Education (ACE) E. Sources of Credit: Credit or exemption from program requirements may be earned through work at accredited institutions, non-accredited institutions, other coursework or training of substance, life experiences, and tests and pre-college work. 1. Regionally Accredited Institutions or Nationally Accredited Institutions recognized by CHEA (Council for Higher Education Accreditation) : The registrar evaluates credit as to its comparability and appropriateness as noted in the principles set forth above and may consult the appropriate department if the appropriateness and comparability of the credit are doubtful. 2. Non-accredited Institutions (not accredited by one of the above agencies) or other coursework or training of substance: Credit is awarded on a reduced scale of completed terms or hours with 60 clock hours as the minimum for one credit or 16 credits for one academic year of full-time attendance. A cap of 30 semester credits is established for this type of coursework. ACE evaluated credit is also included in this area. 3. Life Experiences: A form requesting credit for stated purposes is filed by the student. Credit may then be granted following an assessment of the student’s portfolio by a qualified Concordia instructor, a qualified instructor from another institution, written examination by a Concordia instructor or department or an examination prepared by CAEL or a similar organization, faculty committee assessment, personal interview, or competency demonstration. A fee is assessed for transcripting this type of credit. 4. Tests and Pre-College Work: Credit may be granted for satisfactory performance (See C. 4 above) in experiences of the following types. a. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) b. DANTES, the military version of CLEP c. Advanced Placement programs of secondary schools (AP) d. Local examinations or verification-of competence e. International Baccalaureate Program (IB) F. Evaluation Responsibilities and Curriculum Applications Credit may be applied to one of the following curriculum requirements. 1. General Education Curriculum: The primary responsibility for evaluation rests with the registrar who shall consult the General Education Committee if the appropriateness and comparability of the credit is doubtful. Transfer credits in the general education area are entered as a “Pass” grade and do not count in GPA calculation. 2. Majors, minors, emphases, certificate, and program courses: The appropriateness and comparability of credit in these areas shall be assessed by the appropriate department or instructor and approved by the department and the student’s academic adviser on a Course Substitution Request form. Transfer credits in the major are entered as a letter grade and will count in GPA calculation, with the exception of approved study abroad coursework. Study abroad coursework that has been approved for a major or minor will be entered as “Pass” with an earned grade of “C-” or higher and will not count in GPA calculation. 3. Electives: The appropriateness and comparability of credits in this area shall be assessed by the registrar. Transfer credits in the elective area are entered as a “Pass” grade and do not count in GPA calculation.

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6.64 CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS
Concordia University grants permission for its faculty to distribute continuing education units in areas in which they are highly qualified. If such continuing education units are offered under the umbrella of the University, the faculty must obtain prior authorization from a college dean as well as the accrediting or licensing institution.

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6.70 CLASS ROSTERS AND GRADING
A. Instructors are responsible for managing their course enrollment(s). B. All students registered for the course are expected to be in class attendance. If a student on the roster has never attended, the appropriate office must be notified by the end of the first week of the instructional period. C. For any student who has attended at least once, each instructor is responsible for taking attendance, establishing the last date of attendance if a student discontinues, and for reporting excessive absences to the Director of Advising. D. The current official course enrollment is available online. All changes are updated online. Students are able to make changes to their schedule online according to the posted drop, add, and withdrawal dates. E. Grades are entered online by the instructor. Only students on the official roster may receive grades. 1. Each student on the final course roster should receive a grade. 2. A “W” grade may only be entered by the registrar. 3. The P-N grade should be given only when the student has so registered, when the instructor has been so notified by the registrar, or for internships, student teaching, and courses identified as P/N courses. 4. An “I” grade may only be entered by the registrar upon receipt of the Request for an In-Progress Grade. (See Policy 7.301 for more information on In-Progress Grades.) 5. When entering a grade of “F”, the last date of attendance must be entered. F. The deadline for entering grades online will be announced by the Office of the Registrar. G. The registrar is responsible for posting grades in a timely manner. H. Grades (A, B, C, D, F, P/N) given in a specific course may not be changed after they have been reported to the Office of the Registrar by the instructor unless it is found that an error has been made in calculation or in recording. Grades earned in a course may not be changed due to work submitted in a later term. Errors in recording or miscalculation must be changed no later than the end of the semester following the error. Academic integrity violations have no time limitations. Grade changes must have accompanying documentation and be approved by the faculty member, the Department Chair and the Dean of the College. I. Students who wish to appeal final course grades must do so within 90 days from the date the grade is posted by the registrar.

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6.701 MID-TERM GRADES FOR STUDENTS IN TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
A. In addition to a final course grade, course instructors will enter a mid-term grade for full-semester courses through the online grading system. B. Mid-term grades will not become part of the student’s official transcript. The purpose of the mid-term grade is to provide students with consistent feedback across all courses for use in advising and academic support. C. The submission deadline will be included in the Academic Calendar.

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7.05 ADMISSION POLICY FOR UNDERGRADUATE TRADITIONAL STUDENTS
I. Freshmen and freshmen transfers with less than 20 semester credits. A. Requirements 1. An application 2. Official High School Transcripts 3. ACT Score Report 4. Admission criteria a. Fiftieth (50th) percentile rank or higher from an accredited high school or an equivalent e.g. General Education Development Test (GED) b. ACT composite score of 19, and no sub-score below the 20th percentile c. High school grade point average of 2.00 or higher, and college cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher (if applicable) B. Procedural guidelines for new freshmen and freshmen transfer applicants who do not meet the university’s admission criteria and who will be referred to the Admission Committee. 1. An official ACT profile ACT composite score of no less than 13, sub-scores in English, math, and reading above the 16th percentile and scaled scores above the 6th percentile in English Usage/Mechanics, Rhetoric Skills, Pre-Algebra/Elementary Algebra, Algebra/ Coordinate Geometry, Social Studies/Science, and Art/Literature 2. Acceptable credits equivalent of “C” or better in these types and numbers of courses on a high school transcript or an equivalent, such as GED English 4 Years Math (Algebra, Geometry) 2 Years Science (Biology and either Chemistry or Physics) 2 Years History/Social Science 2 Years Fine Arts 2 Years Health/Physical Education 1 Year 3. Two satisfactory letters of recommendation: one from a high school official, preferably a guidance counselor or another source if graduated from high school more than two years ago, and one from a reliable reference (employer, clergy person, etc.). 4. A writing sample a. Applicants with a composite ACT score lower than 19 are required to provide a writing sample. b. Writers must demonstrate fair writing ability (64-74) on “Interpretive Guide for College and University Placement,” as cited in Testing ESL Composition: A Practical Approach by Jacobs et al. II. For transfer and post-baccalaureate applicants with 20 or more semester credits A. Requirements 1. An application 2. Admission criteria a. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 from previous accredited college(s) b. If an applicant fails to meet the CGPA criterion, admission criteria for freshmen will be used i. Fiftieth (50th) percentile rank or higher from an accredited high school or an equivalent, e.g. General Education Development Test (GED) ii. ACT composite score of 19, and no sub-score below the 20th percentile iii. High school grade point average of 2.00 or higher B. Procedural guidelines for transfer applicants with 20 or more semester credits who do not meet admission criteria and who will be referred to the admission committee. 1. Acceptable credits of “C” or better in these types of courses on college transcripts: English Math (Algebra, Geometry) Science (Biological and Physical) History/Social Science Fine Arts Health/Physical Education 2. High school transcript with “C” or better in above mentioned courses 3. Two satisfactory letters of recommendation: one from the dean of students of the last institution attended and one from a reliable reference. 4. Personal Essay; 1-2 typed pages addressing the following prompt: Explain why you feel you will be a successful student at Concordia and address the steps you will take to ensure success. Please comment specifically on any of the following areas that may apply to your situation: Academic record, standardized test preparation and performance, gaps in educational career, personal experiences III. International Students A. Additional Requirements 1. International applicants with less than 20 semester credits must have one of the following: TOEFL score of at least 500 on the paper-based test TOEFL score of at least 173 on the computer-based test Michigan test score of 70 Completed level 109 from the English Language Services (ELS) 2. International transfer applicants without an ACT must have one of the following: CGPA of 2.0 from a U.S. college TOEFL score of 500 on the paper-based test TOEFL score of 173 on the computer-based test Michigan test score of 70 Completed level 109 from the English Language Services (ELS) 3. International students must also submit the Certification of Finances Form B. Procedural Guidelines 1. All international applications will be reviewed by the Director of English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL). 2. Applicants who do not meet the institution’s admission criteria and additional requirements will be referred to the Admission Committee. IV. Admission Committee A. Membership and Structure 1. The Admission Committee for Traditional Undergraduate applicants shall be composed of these voting members who will accept or reject applicants: a. Associate Vice President for Traditional Enrollment Management, chair b. Two approved full-time teaching faculty members, appointed by the Associate Vice President for Traditional Enrollment Management c. Director of Student Success, or designee d. Assistant Director of Academic Advising, or designee 2. These nonvoting advisory committee members will be invited to attend meetings when student issues related to particular professional expertise is needed. The input of these professionals will be strongly considered by the committee: a. Director of Undergraduate Admission b. International Student Academic Advisor c. Director of Student Accessibility Services B. Roles and responsibilities: 1. The committee will decide approval or denial of all applicants who do not meet admission criteria. 2. The committee will admit applicants who demonstrate college potential. 3. The committee will actively support programs to ensure that students who are referred to the Admission Committee persist and succeed at Concordia University. 4. The committee will monitor relevant data concerning admitted students for the purpose of assessment of criteria met, retention, and subsequent success. 5. The committee will annually review and submit to the Faculty Senate, through the Undergraduate Policy Committee (UPC), any changes in admission policies, procedures, standards and guidelines their experience and expertise determine necessary.

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7.11 COMPLETING TWO BACCALAUREATE DEGREES
A. Students may complete two Baccalaureate degrees of different types (BS/BA, BS/BBA, BA/BBA, etc.). To do this, students must complete the general education requirements and the requirements of both baccalaureate degree programs. Students who complete the requirements for a major leading to a Bachelor of Arts and a major leading to a Bachelor of Science will be awarded both a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science degree if there are no more than 12 credits overlap of coursework between the majors. B. Students who have previously completed a baccalaureate degree may complete a second baccalaureate degree of the same type, for example BA/BA if they meet  the following criteria: complete the theology general education requirement; complete 32 credits in residence; and complete 50% of the major at Concordia. C. Students completing two majors concurrently in the same degree type will earn one degree with two majors, for example BA with majors in English and Art.

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7.23 COURSE PLACEMENT FOR GENERAL EDUCATION
Where placement is required for general education courses, the department with the content expertise is responsible for placement. Content areas in which placement may be required are writing, reading, foreign language, and mathematics.

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7.24 COURSE SUBSTITUTIONS
A. The Registrar will evaluate new student transcripts and apply general education credits according to University policy. Students wishing to apply additional transfer courses to general education credits, other than those initially accepted by the Registrar, must petition an exception using the Course Substitution Request form. A syllabus for the transfer course must be included. This petition must be approved by the student’s advisor and the General Education Committee. The request will be retained in the student’s academic file. B. Students wishing to apply transfer courses to their major, minor, or emphasis must petition for approval using the Course Substitution Request form. A syllabus for the transfer course must be included. The petition must be approved by the student’s advisor and the chair of the department offering the major, minor, or emphasis. The request will be retained in the student’s academic file. C. Students wishing to substitute a different Concordia University course for one required by a current major, minor, or emphasis must petition for approval using the Course Substitution Request form. The petition must be approved by the student’s advisor and the chair of the department offering the major, minor, or emphasis. The request will be retained in the student’s academic file.

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7.25 COURSE REPETITION TO IMPROVE A GRADE
A. Students may repeat a course. However, the course required of all incoming first-year students cannot be dropped, withdrawn from, and/or retaken. B. If students repeat a course, only the higher/highest grade is used in computing cumulative grade point average (CGPA).

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7.26 ADDING AND DROPPING/WITHDRAWING FROM COURSES IN TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
A. Definition of terms 1. Drop without record: No entry is recorded on the student’s permanent record. 2. Withdrawal (Drop with record): A “W” grade is entered on the student’s permanent record. A “W” grade does not affect a student’s grade point average but does count toward credits attempted and may impact the student’s satisfactory progress. Standards for satisfactory progress are defined in 7.33 Satisfactory Progress Policy and recorded in the academic catalog. 3. Courses: A “course” is defined as any credit-bearing traditional or web-based class, field experience, internship, or independent study in the traditional programs. 4. Effective dates: The date that the course addition or withdrawal is effective is the date that all required forms with all required signatures are received by the Registrar. B. Deadlines for adding a course 1. After classes have begun for fall and spring semester, students may add half-semester and full- semester coursed within the first five academic calendar days of the course (not including weekends and holidays). Internship and independent study courses may be added within the first ten days of the semester. 2. Students may add a course, internship, or independent study for a summer term through the end of the first days of class of that term. This includes submitting paperwork for an internship or independent study. C. Withdrawal dates and times 1. Dropping without record a. Full-semester courses: Students may drop without record within the first ten academic calendar days (not including weekends and holidays) of full-semester courses. b. Half-semester courses: Students may drop without record within the first five academic calendar days (not including weekends and holidays) of half-semester courses. c. Less than half-semester courses: Students may drop without record through the first one- seventh of the class meeting times. 2. Withdrawal (Drop with record) a. Full-semester courses: Students may withdraw from full-semester courses anytime from the eleventh class day (not including weekends and holidays but including class days when the particular course does not meet) through the fiftieth class day and receive a “W” grade. b. Half-semester courses: Students may withdraw from half-semester courses anytime from the sixth academic calendar day (not including weekends and holidays) through the twentieth- fifth class day and receive a “W” grade. c. Less than half-semester courses: Students may withdraw from less than half- semester courses and receive a “W” through the first five-sevenths of the class meeting times.

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7.27 TRADITIONAL STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE DROP/WITHDRAW
A. Administrative Drop (Day 1 of semester through the last day to drop without record) If a student has not:  attended any registered courses  communicated with instructors or advisor  submitted any assignments, that student will be dropped from all registration for the term and withdrawn from the university. This will be completed by the last day to drop a traditional course without record. Their Academic Advisor will attempt to contact the student via phone and email to inform him/her that this process has been initiated. If by the last day to drop a traditional courses there is no response from the student, the Academic Advisor will complete the University Withdrawal Form on behalf of the student indicating that the student never attended. B. Administrative Withdraw (After last day to drop without record through the last day to withdraw) If, after beginning and participating in classes, a student then stops:  attending class(es) for at least two weeks  communicating with instructors or advisor  submitting any assignments, the Academic Advisor will attempt to contact the student with a participation warning. The student will have 48 hours after final notice to declare their intent to continue or show engagement in the course(s). If there is no response from the student, the Academic Advisor will complete the University Withdrawal Form on behalf of the student to have them withdrawn from the course(s) indicating the last date of attendance (if available). The student will receive a grade of “W” for the course(s).

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7.28 AUDITING COURSES IN TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
A. Students who satisfy the requirements for admission may register to audit a course without receiving academic credit for the course. B. Auditing students need not meet regular course requirements but should confer with the instructor as to their privileges and responsibilities in the course. Upon completion of the course, a grade of “V” is recorded on the student’s permanent record. C. Students may find it helpful to audit a course to review materials for a more advanced course or to enrich an interest area. Auditors are excluded from laboratory and studio participation. D. Students may change regular registration to an audit before the end of the eighth week of the semester. Registration may be canceled for non-attendance.

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7.29 TRADITIONAL STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE DROP/WITHDRAW
A. Administrative Drop (Day 1 of semester through the last day to drop without record) If a student has not:  attended any registered courses  communicated with instructors or advisor  participated in the course(s) through attendance, discussion board postings, web-ex sessions and/or submitted any assignments or exams, that student will be dropped from all registration for the term and withdrawn from the university. This will be completed by the last day to drop a course(s) without record. Their Academic Advisor will attempt to contact the student via phone and email to inform him/her that this process has been initiated. The student will be given 48 hours to declare their intent to continue in the registered course(s). If by the last day to drop a courses there is no response from the student, the Academic Advisor will complete the University Withdrawal Form on behalf of the student indicating that the student never attended. B. Administrative Withdraw (After last day to drop without record through the last day to withdraw) If, after beginning and participating in classes, a student then stops:  attending class(es) for at least 10 or more consecutive days for 14 week classes and 7 or more consecutive days for 7 week classes  communicating with instructors or advisor  participating in the course(s) through attendance, discussion board postings, web-ex sessions and/or submitting any assignments or exams, the Academic Advisor will attempt to contact the student with a participation warning. The student will have 48 hours after final notice to declare their intent to continue or show engagement in the course(s). If there is no response from the student, the Academic Advisor will complete the University Withdrawal Form on behalf of the student to have them withdrawn from the course(s) indicating the last date of attendance (if available). The student will receive a grade of “W” for the course(s).

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7.30 GRADING SYSTEM
A Superior 4.00 A- 3.67 B+ 3.33 B Above Average 3.00 B- 2.67 C+ 2.33 C Average 2.00 C- 1.67 D+ 1.33 D Below Average 1.00 D- 0.67 F 0.00 P Pass N No Pass X Continuing registration for more than one term V Audit W Withdrawal: Student officially withdrew from a course during the third through the eighth week of the semester. In Progress. This grade is given to students who have missed part of their assigned work due to circumstances beyond their control, but who otherwise are doing satisfactory work (See Policy 7.301). POLICY NUMBER: 7.30 POLICY NAME: Grading System DATE: Approved by the Undergraduate Policy Committee on March 9, 2005

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7.301 IN-PROGRESS GRADE
A. In-Progress (“I”) grades may be given to students who have missed part of their assigned work due to circumstances beyond their control, but otherwise have done satisfactory work. Students who are unable to finish all the required coursework for a course may request an “I.”. B. Instructors must submit the In-Progress Grade Request by the grading deadline to the registrar’s office. It is the students’ responsibility to initiate an In-Progress Grade Request. However, instructors may deny an In-Progress Grade Request. C. Guidelines: 1. All course requirements to remove an In-Progress grade and in some cases to remove probationary or disqualification status must be completed within four weeks of the last day of class. 2. If students are unable to complete the work within four weeks, extensions may be requested from the instructor for a maximum of six months from the last day of the course. 3. If the work is not completed within the agreed upon time, the instructor will submit a grade, based on course grading procedures specified in the syllabus. 4. If a grade is not submitted to the Registrar by the agreed upon time, the recorded “I” will become an “F” or “N.”

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7.31 PASS-NO PASS GRADING
A. In courses usually graded A-F 1. A course usually graded A-F may be taken P-N by a student if the course is an elective. A course is designated as elective when it is not used by a given student to meet any specific area or course requirement including the general education program, major, minor, or emphasis. To take a course usually graded A-F as a P-N course, a student must file the appropriate P-N form with the Office of the Registrar before the end of the seventh week of the term, or its equivalent for a half-semester course. 2. The “P” grade is equated to the normal “A” to “C-” grade range. P-N courses transferred in by students as required courses (a course is designated as required when it is used by a given students to meet any specific area or course requirement including the general education program, major, minor, or emphasis) are acceptable only from colleges where the grading system is the normal system as described above. 3. There is a four-credit limit of P-N courses per semester for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Other courses and internships (see below) which are graded by the P-N system do not count towards these limits. B. In courses only graded P-N 1. Field experiences such as internships and student teaching, and intercollegiate athletic activities are offered ONLY on a “Pass-No Pass” basis. 2. A student may earn a maximum of eight credits in the combined music/theatre area and one credit in each area of athletics that are applicable to the total credits for graduation requirements. The maximum credit limit applies to students who are not music/theatre majors, minors or emphases. 3. Although these courses apply toward graduation requirements, they are not calculated into the cumulative grade point average.

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7.32 DEAN’S LIST AND ACADEMIC HONORS RECOGNITION
A. Full-time undergraduate students who earn a grade point average (GPA) of 3.60 and above in a given academic semester are included on the Dean’s List. To be considered, all incompletes must be removed by the end of the second week after exam week. B. The following criteria are used to determine eligibility for the Dean’s List: 1. Full-time students must earn a grade point average (GPA) of 3.60 or better in a particular academic semester; students with more than half of their credits on the P-N grading system must have a cumulative GPA of 3.60 or greater. 2. All incompletes must be removed by the end of the second week after the examination week. C. The Dean’s List is prepared by the Office of the Registrar at the end of the second week of each semester. Acknowledgments are sent to those students who appear on the list by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. D. Full-time students in bachelor degree programs in Concordia University, St. Paul who have earned at least 60 credits at Concordia and who have earned at a cumulative grade point average of 3.90 or higher are designated as graduating summa cum laude; those students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.75-3.89 are designated as graduating magna cum laude; those students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.60 to 3.74 are designated as graduating cum laude. Students in bachelor degree programs at Concordia University, St. Paul who have earned fewer than 60 credits and have at least a 3.90 GPA at Concordia will be recognized as graduating “with high distinction.” Students who have earned fewer than 60 credits and have a GPA between 3.75 and 3.89 will be recognized as graduating “with distinction.”

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7.33 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
A. To be eligible to register continuously without conditions, a student must achieve satisfactory academic progress. Concordia will follow federal-financial-aid policy on satisfactory academic progress as long as Concordia accepts federal funding. B. When a student does not maintain satisfactory progress, the University will impose certain restrictions that will affect the student’s eligibility for enrollment: 1. Academic Probation: Academic probation is a formal warning that students did not achieve satisfactory progress. A student on probation will remain eligible to enroll in the subsequent term for a maximum of 16 credits, but must achieve satisfactory progress at the end of that term or face disqualification. 2. Disqualification: Disqualification occurs when students do not meet satisfactory academic progress requirements for two consecutive terms. Students may appeal to be re-admitted by completing the Disqualification Appeal Form. 3. Additionally, for first year students with no prior college credits earned, first term of enrollment: To be eligible to return for a second term, a student must achieve at least a 1.0 GPA their first term. Disqualification occurs when first-term students do not achieve a 1.0 GPA. Students will be notified of their disqualification in writing by the registrar. Students are ineligible to register for subsequent terms. Students may appeal to be readmitted by completing the Disqualification Appeal Form.

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7.34 ELIGIBILITY POLICIES FOR ATHLETICS
A. The University is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and agrees to abide by its rules and policies. Eligibility rules and regulations governing students’ participation in intercollegiate athletics are available through the Office of the Athletic Director. B. The Director of Compliance, assisted by the Faculty Athlete Representative, is charged with the responsibility of ensuring that all participants in intercollegiate competition are eligible in accordance with the rule and regulations of the NCAA prior to their representing the institution in any manner.

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7.35 ACADEMIC RECORDS, TRANSCRIPTS AND CREDENTIALS
A. A permanent record or file of academic information is maintained in the Office of the Registrar. The registrar is responsible for the maintenance of complete and accurate records. B. Faculty members may use academic record files from the registrar for proper academic purposes as defined in FERPA regulations. C. Official transcripts are issued only with signed consent of the student and are sent directly to the designee they request. The official transcript carries the signature of the registrar and bears the seal of Concordia University. D. Students, in good standing, may have access to an unofficial copy of their transcript. E. LCT/DPM/DCO/DCE candidates request credentials from the Department of Theology and Ministry. F. Credentials are defined as various references and records (evaluations/recommendations), usually with a transcript of credits.

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7.36 OFFICIAL COMMUNICATION BY EMAIL
Concordia University communicates electronically to its students through the University’s email system. Students are expected to read all official communications sent by the University to their csp.edu address, and respond appropriately.

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7.40 CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICY
A. Students are expected to attend all class meetings and laboratory sessions for the courses in which they are enrolled. B. Excessive absences as determined by the instructor and written in the course syllabus may result in disqualification or failure. C. Instructors must include policies for handling absences and make-up work in the syllabus. Instructors may not penalize students who are required to be absent from class because of official university activities. Examples of such activities are intercollegiate athletics, university music tours, theater productions, and so forth. In addition, instructors may not penalize students who are required to be absent from class because of mandatory military training of up to two weeks per semester that cannot be deferred. Students, however, are responsible for informing the instructor in advance of the impending absence (according to a timetable determined by the instructor) and for making up any missed work at a time determined by the instructor. Instructors have the right to contact the appropriate person to determine the legitimacy of the intended absence. D. Instructors planning field trips or any other official university activities must secure the appropriate approvals as outlined in Faculty Handbook Policy 6.65. E. Instructors must be able to determine the student’s last day of attendance.

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7.41 STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING
A student in good standing is one who: A. is registered for the current term, B. is attending class in accordance with Concordia’s class attendance policy, C. is not delinquent in meeting financial obligations to the University, D. is not on disciplinary probation, and E. is not on academic (financial aid) probation.

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7.50 BRINGING CHILDREN TO CLASS
The practice of bringing children to class is discouraged due primarily to the impact of such on the learning environment. Children may not attend class without prior approval by the instructor.

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7.81 DECLARING A MAJOR AND APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION
A. Students must declare a major or two minors upon completing 45 credits. Students may declare a major or two minors at any time prior to 45 credits. B. Students must apply for graduation in accordance with the procedures set by the Registrar.

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