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Scholarship and Teaching

2.74 SABBATICAL LEAVES
A. Each institution shall state policies regarding sabbaticals for faculty and leave of absence procedures for all employees within Board for Higher Education guidelines. (2001 Synodical Handbook 6.57) B. The purpose of a sabbatical leave is to provide a time of scholarly renewal for the faculty member. It is assumed that this renewal comes when the faculty member has sufficient time to devote to study and exploration in his or her field. Therefore, the primary criterion for approval of sabbatical leave is evidence of scholarly activity. This may include professional growth activities such as significant research, creative work, advanced studies, and special discipline-related service to the district, synod, or other external education or government agencies. The sabbatical project should lead to a deeper and broader understanding of one’s discipline and/or to an understanding of a new discipline. Recipients of sabbatical leaves should be prepared to provide some tangible evidence of scholarly achievement. This may include (but is not limited to) such things as published articles, professional presentations, and creative works. The sabbatical leave application should clearly identify the scholarship goals. C. Procedures: 1. Full time ranked faculty receive consideration for a sabbatical based upon their index number. Those with the highest index number will ordinarily receive priority consideration for a half-year sabbatical. The index number is determined by years of service at synodical institutions of higher education minus the number of previous sabbaticals (at Concordia University, St. Paul or other synodical institutions of higher education) multiplied by nine. Example: Professor X has served synodical institutions of higher education as a full-time ranked faculty member for 23 years, with two sabbaticals. Professor X’s index number would be determined as follows: 23 years of full-time service -18 (2 previous sabbaticals, 2 x 9 = 18) 5 (index number) 2. A Leave of Absence has no effect on the individual’s index number. 3. Individuals with an index number of seven or higher and who have not had a sabbatical in the last five full years may apply for a full year sabbatical at any time. Full year sabbaticals are granted in addition to the previously determined number of half-year sabbaticals. 4. Faculty coming to the University from other synodical institutions of higher education must serve a minimum of 2 years at Concordia University, St. Paul prior to receiving a sabbatical, index number not withstanding. Faculty members who have served at non-synodical institutions of higher learning will be given one index number for every two years served at those institutions, not to exceed an index number of four. 5. At least five full years must intervene between a faculty member’s sabbaticals, index number not withstanding. 6. The Vice President for Academic Affairs sets the number of half-year sabbatical openings at least five years in advance, and forwards to the Board of Regents names of individuals who will be eligible for half and full year sabbaticals for the next three years. Faculty members are informed when their name has been forwarded to the Board of Regents for preliminary approval. 7. All faculty members will be informed annually by the Vice President of Academic Affairs their index number, as well as an estimate of the year that they will be eligible for sabbatical leave. Faculty members eligible for sabbatical leave will be notified by the dean of their respective colleges two years prior to the anticipated sabbatical date. This notification will include a copy of the sabbatical leave application instructions. 8. Normally, faculty members with the highest index number are granted sabbaticals if their sabbatical application meets the scholarship criteria. When there are more applications than sabbatical openings at a specific index number, the quality of the application and the potential benefit for Concordia University, St. Paul are used as prioritizing criteria in selecting sabbatical recipients. 9. Typically, half year sabbaticals at full pay are scheduled for July 1 – December 31, or January 1 – June 30 as desired by the individual faculty member, and a full year sabbatical at half pay covers one calendar year, and is scheduled from July 1 – June 30. However, if other dates would interfere less with teaching and administrative responsibilities, the faculty member may choose an alternative sabbatical schedule. The rationale for requesting the alternative dates should be provided in the sabbatical application. 10. The Vice President for Academic Affairs and the appropriate college dean make provisions for the workloads of the faculty members who have been granted a sabbatical. Guest instructors are provided with the adequate supplies, space, and equipment to carry out their assigned tasks. 11. A faculty member receiving a sabbatical leave may apply for an additional fellowship or grants for this period to help defray sabbatical costs 12. Faculty members on sabbatical continue to receive full Concordia Plans benefits. D. Sabbatical Leave Application Process: 1. The formal application for sabbatical leave is due October 1 of the academic year prior to the academic year in which the sabbatical is scheduled, and should include the components described below. A letter of support from the college dean should accompany the application detailing how the college/department proposes to cover the faculty member’s teaching and/or administrative workload. Faculty members are encouraged to make use of the resources of the Faculty Scholarship Center when preparing their proposal. An electronic version of the application form is available. 2. The application is submitted to the Faculty Development Policies Committee. The committee will review applications and may request additional information from the faculty member and/or work with the faculty member to strengthen the proposal if necessary. The committee shall forward its recommendations for sabbaticals to the Vice President for Academic Affairs by November 20. The Vice President for Academic Affairs makes his or her recommendations to the President of the institution by December 15, and, at the same time, informs the individual applicants of that recommendation. If an application is not recommended by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the faculty member next on the index number priority list will be invited to apply for a sabbatical leave. The President of the University forwards his or her recommendations to the Board of Regents. Upon recommendation from the president, the Board of Regents takes action on the requested sabbaticals in their January meeting. At any time in this recommendation process, if the recommendation is contrary to that of the Faculty Development Policies Committee, the committee may file a report advocating its position. The faculty member shall receive formal notification of the decision regarding the sabbatical application from the president of the institution within six months of the application. During the spring semester of the academic year, the Vice President for Academic Affairs shall publicize the names of the recipients of the sabbatical leaves for the following year. E. Format for Sabbatical Leave Application 1. Date of Application 2. Name of Faculty Member 3. Anticipated dates of sabbatical leave 4. Title of Sabbatical Project 5. Description of the project 6. Goals and objectives of the project 7. Work plan and time frame for the project 8. Any additional funds which will be received during the sabbatical 9 Timeliness of the project for faculty member’s career and for the institution 10. Description of qualifications faculty member possesses which will enable completion of the project 11. How and when the project will be evaluated 12. How and when the project’s results will be shared with others 13. Applicant’s signature and date F. Obligations of Sabbatical Recipient 1. Makes every reasonable effort to fulfill the terms of the sabbatical 2. Submits a revised plan to the VPAA for approval should circumstances nullify the first plan or if a new opportunity of greater professional value arises. The Vice President for Academic Affairs shall consult with the Faculty Development Committee before making a decision on the revised plan 3. Returns to the University for a minimum of one academic year following the completion of the sabbatical leave 4. Files a report of the sabbatical activities with the Faculty Development Committee and the Vice President for Academic Affairs immediately following the close of the sabbatical leave. This report includes an assessment of the faculty member’s achievement of the scholarship goals identified in the sabbatical leave application. 5. Shares the product of the sabbatical with the campus community in an appropriate way.

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2.884 FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP CENTER
A. Policy: The University supports a Faculty Scholarship Center. The mission of the Faculty Scholarship Center is to promote the preparation of students through the encouragement and facilitation of the faculty’s professional growth and scholarship in the areas of discovery, teaching, application, and integration. The director of the Faculty Scholarship Center serves as member of the Faculty Development Policies Committee and reports to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Faculty Development Policies Committee oversees the activities of the Faculty Scholarship Center and advises the director. B. Procedures 1. The Faculty Scholarship Center is faculty run and driven. 2. The director of the Faculty Scholarship Center is appointed for a three year, renewable by the Vice President for Academic Affairs upon recommendation of the Faculty Development Policies Committee from nominees submitted by the faculty. The director shall be a full time member of the faculty in a tenured or tenure track position employed 2/3 time by the Faculty Scholarship Center, while maintaining a minimum teaching load of one course per semester, or 1/3 time teaching. The director shall be replaced in his or her department for teaching and other load responsibilities. The director is a permanent voting member of the Faculty Development Policies Committee during her or his tenure as director. 3. The Faculty Scholarship Center will be only indirectly connected to performance review. Individual faculty members may request services from the center that will enhance her or his review process in areas related to scholarship. However, the Faculty Scholarship Center will not function as an evaluation center. 4. The model upon which the Faculty Scholarship Center is based, and a listing of various activities related to the scholarship of teaching, discovery, application, and integration is available in the Faculty Scholarship Center.

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2.89 TRAVEL FOR PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS
A. Policy: The University encourages faculty attendance at professional conferences and meetings. B. Procedures 1. Full-time tenure-track faculty members are provided funds (up to 2% of the base salary of an assistant professor) for professional conference attendance each academic year. 2. Prior to attending the conference, the faculty member should submit an application which includes the title of the conference, goals the individual has for attending, and a budget of expenses to his or her department chair or dean for approval. 3. As an assessment tool, upon returning from the conference, the faculty member shall provide to the dean of his or her college a summary of the conference and its applicability to the faculty member’s professional interests and teaching responsibilities. 4. If a faculty member does not use his or her travel funds, the dean of his or her college may make those funds available to other faculty members with exceptional travel needs. Any remaining travel fund money will be transferred to the quasi-endowment for faculty development grants.

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2.894 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS POLICY
Preamble The parties to this agreement believe that the University’s interest is best served by creating an intellectual environment whereby creative efforts and innovations can be encouraged and rewarded, while still retaining for the University and its learning communities reasonable access to, and use of, the intellectual property for whose creation the University has provided assistance. The University supports the development, production, and dissemination of intellectual property by its faculty members. What is Intellectual Property? When used in this agreement, the term “Intellectual Property” shall be understood collectively to mean Copyrights, Patents, Patent Applications, and discoveries which are not protectable under the U.S. Patent laws, and Copyrights. When used in this agreement, the term “Copyright” shall be understood to mean that bundle of rights that protect original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device. “Works of authorship” (including computer programs) include, but are not limited to the following: literary works; musical works, including any accompanying words; dramatic works, including any accompanying music; pantomimes and choreographic works; pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works (photographs, prints, diagrams, models, and technical drawings); motion pictures and other audiovisual works; sound recordings; and architectural works. “Tangible media” include, but are not limited to, books, periodicals, manuscripts, phonorecords, films, tapes, and disks. When used in this agreement, the term “Patent” shall be understood to mean that bundle of rights that protect inventions or discoveries which constitute any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof; new and ornamental designs for any useful article and plant patents being for the asexual reproduction of a distinct variety of plant, including cultivated sprouts, mutants, hybrids, and new found seedlings, other than a tuber propagated plant or plant found in an uncultivated state. Who Owns the Intellectual Property? Intellectual property created, made, or originated by a faculty member* shall be the sole and exclusive property of the faculty member author or inventor, except as he or she may voluntarily choose to transfer such property, in full, or in part, except as provided below: a. In accepting grants, fellowships, or other donations for research projects from private business or industry and from the federal government, the University generally must obligate itself to such sponsors under invention and patent clauses in the agreement with such sponsors. In these situations, the sponsor and/or the University may be the owner . b. If the University has specifically directed the faculty member to engage in research and a written agreement is entered into between the University and the faculty member, then the resulting intellectual property shall be owned as set forth in such written agreement. c. The University shall own copyright in the following three circumstances: 1. The University expressly directs a faculty member to create a specified work, or the work is created as a specific requirement of employment or as an assigned institutional duty that may, for example, be included in a written job description or an employment agreement. 2. The faculty member author has voluntarily transferred the copyright, in whole or in part to the institution. Such transfer shall be in the form of a written document signed by the faculty member author. 3. The University (including without limitation natural persons, employees, agents, consultants and contractors of the University) contributed to a “joint work” under the Copyright Act. The University can exercise joint ownership under this clause when it has contributed specialized services and facilities to the production of the work that goes beyond what is traditionally provided to faculty members generally in the preparation of their course materials. Such latter arrangement is to be agreed to in writing, in advance, and in full conformance with other provisions of this policy. Intellectual property owned by the University may generally be used by faculty members in the performance of their duties at the University; provided, however, that the University may prohibit such use upon written notice to the faculty member (e.g., in the case where a research sponsor has prohibited such use). Any other faculty member use of intellectual property owned by the University must be approved by the University. Faculty members are encouraged to negotiate with the University a contract which clearly delineates the use and dissemination of any of the above work. Any and all trademarks, service marks, trade names, and other indicia, marks, and designations of the University are the sole and exclusive property of the University. Such marks are not included under the term intellectual property and no rights to any of such marks are granted and/or conveyed to any faculty member hereunder. WHO MAY USE THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY? Material created for ordinary teaching use in the classroom and in department programs, such as syllabi, assignments, and tests, shall remain the property of the faculty author, but the University shall be permitted to use such material for internal instructional, educational, and administrative purposes, including satisfying requests of accreditation agencies for faculty-authored syllabi and course descriptions. In an agreement transferring copyright for such works to a publisher, faculty authors shall provide rights for the University to use such works for internal instructional, educational, and administrative purposes. DISTRIBUTION OF ANY FUNDS GENERATED Funds received by the faculty member from the sale, licensing, rental, lease, and/or other disposition of intellectual property owned by the faculty member author or inventor shall be allocated and expended as determined solely by the faculty member author or inventor. Funds received by the University from the sale, licensing, rental, lease, and/or other disposition of intellectual property owned by the University shall be allocated and expended as determined solely by the University. Funds received by the faculty member and the University from the sale of intellectual property owned jointly by the faculty member and the University shall be allocated and expended in accordance with a specific agreement. If no written agreement is in place, then the parties agree to submit the issue to the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. The parties agree to be bound by the determination of that committee. In the event of multiple creators, the creators will determine the allocation their individual shares when the work is first undertaken. If no written agreement is entered into prior to undertaking the work, then the parties agree to submit the issue to the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. The parties agree to be bound by the determination of that committee. HOW TO RESOLVE EMERGING ISSUES AND DISPUTES The Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee will be composed of six members equally apportioned between faculty (elected by the Faculty Senate) and University administration (appointed by the president or his designee.). The committee members shall elect a chair from among themselves each year and will convene only when called upon to address issues or resolve disputes regarding intellectual property rights. At the time of initial appointment or election, each member shall be designated as serving a one or two, or three-year term, so that the term of one faculty committee member and one administration member will expire each year and replacements will be appointed or elected each year. After the first appointment subsequent members shall serve a three-year term, commencing on July 1 and terminating on June 30. Committee members may serve one additional three-year term. A seventh member shall also be included on the Committee each year. The term of the seventh member shall be for one year commencing on or about July 1 and terminating on the following June 30. The seventh member shall not vote except for the purpose of breaking a tie vote among the other members of the Committee. The seventh member may not be a member of the University or faculty. Such seventh member shall be selected by a majority of the Committee as the first order of business by the Committee at the start of each term (e.g., at the first meeting of the Committee subsequent to July 1). It is recognized that the seventh member may not be called upon to attend every meeting of the Committee and that such seventh member will generally be selected from the local or regional community (e.g., an educator, business person, academic, politician or other person). The Committee shall monitor and review technological and legislative changes affecting intellectual property policy and shall report to relevant faculty and administrative bodies, when such changes affect existing policies. The Committee shall serve as a forum for the receipt and discussion of proposals to change existing institutional policy and/or to provide recommendations for contract negotiations. In many cases where ideas, inventions, and discoveries are produced within the University, it is difficult to trace the origin to a specific individual or individuals and often difficult to determine the relative rights of the individuals and organizations, including the University, involved. Therefore, disputes over ownership, and its attendant rights, of intellectual property will be decided by the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. However, the purpose of this committee is not to address copyright “fair-use” issues. The Committee shall make an initial determination of whether the University or any other party has rights to the invention or other creation, and, if so, the basis and extent of those rights. The Committee shall also make a determination on resolving competing faculty claims to ownership when the parties cannot reach an agreement on their own. The Committee will review the merits of inventions, and other creations, and make recommendations for the management of the invention, including development, patenting, and exploitation. If the University and/or the inventors/creators disagree with the determination of the committee, then the University and/or he/she may appeal to binding arbitration. The cost of the arbitration shall be borne equally by the University and the creator(s). *Note: This policy is intended to apply to all members of the university community – faculty, staff, administration and students. Policy based on suggestions and guidelines created by American Association of University Professors, 1012 Fourteenth Street, NW, Suite #500; Washington, DC 20005 Reviewed by lawyers May, 2002 Recommended to Senate by Faculty Policies Committee May 7, 2002

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3.34 CONVOCATIONS
A. Concordia University will support, through budgeting and scheduling, an ongoing series of convocations throughout the traditional school year. The frequency of these events will be approximately two per month and will normally be facilitated by the Faculty Scholarship Center Director. B. The intent of this Convocation series is to supplement the educational experience of the Concordia community and to provide an atmosphere of lifelong learning beyond the classroom setting. C. Convocation attendance may be required of students by their professors in support of coursework. D. Like Chapel, classes and other campus activities should not be scheduled in conflict with the announced convocation program schedule.

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Uncategorized

2.884 FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP CENTER
A. Policy: The University supports a Faculty Scholarship Center. The mission of the Faculty Scholarship Center is to promote the preparation of students through the encouragement and facilitation of the faculty’s professional growth and scholarship in the areas of discovery, teaching, application, and integration. The director of the Faculty Scholarship Center serves as member of the Faculty Development Policies Committee and reports to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Faculty Development Policies Committee oversees the activities of the Faculty Scholarship Center and advises the director. B. Procedures 1. The Faculty Scholarship Center is faculty run and driven. 2. The director of the Faculty Scholarship Center is appointed for a three year, renewable by the Vice President for Academic Affairs upon recommendation of the Faculty Development Policies Committee from nominees submitted by the faculty. The director shall be a full time member of the faculty in a tenured or tenure track position employed 2/3 time by the Faculty Scholarship Center, while maintaining a minimum teaching load of one course per semester, or 1/3 time teaching. The director shall be replaced in his or her department for teaching and other load responsibilities. The director is a permanent voting member of the Faculty Development Policies Committee during her or his tenure as director. 3. The Faculty Scholarship Center will be only indirectly connected to performance review. Individual faculty members may request services from the center that will enhance her or his review process in areas related to scholarship. However, the Faculty Scholarship Center will not function as an evaluation center. 4. The model upon which the Faculty Scholarship Center is based, and a listing of various activities related to the scholarship of teaching, discovery, application, and integration is available in the Faculty Scholarship Center.

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2.89 TRAVEL FOR PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS
A. Policy: The University encourages faculty attendance at professional conferences and meetings. B. Procedures 1. Full-time tenure-track faculty members are provided funds (up to 2% of the base salary of an assistant professor) for professional conference attendance each academic year. 2. Prior to attending the conference, the faculty member should submit an application which includes the title of the conference, goals the individual has for attending, and a budget of expenses to his or her department chair or dean for approval. 3. As an assessment tool, upon returning from the conference, the faculty member shall provide to the dean of his or her college a summary of the conference and its applicability to the faculty member’s professional interests and teaching responsibilities. 4. If a faculty member does not use his or her travel funds, the dean of his or her college may make those funds available to other faculty members with exceptional travel needs. Any remaining travel fund money will be transferred to the quasi-endowment for faculty development grants.

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2.894 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS POLICY
Preamble The parties to this agreement believe that the University’s interest is best served by creating an intellectual environment whereby creative efforts and innovations can be encouraged and rewarded, while still retaining for the University and its learning communities reasonable access to, and use of, the intellectual property for whose creation the University has provided assistance. The University supports the development, production, and dissemination of intellectual property by its faculty members. What is Intellectual Property? When used in this agreement, the term “Intellectual Property” shall be understood collectively to mean Copyrights, Patents, Patent Applications, and discoveries which are not protectable under the U.S. Patent laws, and Copyrights. When used in this agreement, the term “Copyright” shall be understood to mean that bundle of rights that protect original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device. “Works of authorship” (including computer programs) include, but are not limited to the following: literary works; musical works, including any accompanying words; dramatic works, including any accompanying music; pantomimes and choreographic works; pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works (photographs, prints, diagrams, models, and technical drawings); motion pictures and other audiovisual works; sound recordings; and architectural works. “Tangible media” include, but are not limited to, books, periodicals, manuscripts, phonorecords, films, tapes, and disks. When used in this agreement, the term “Patent” shall be understood to mean that bundle of rights that protect inventions or discoveries which constitute any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof; new and ornamental designs for any useful article and plant patents being for the asexual reproduction of a distinct variety of plant, including cultivated sprouts, mutants, hybrids, and new found seedlings, other than a tuber propagated plant or plant found in an uncultivated state. Who Owns the Intellectual Property? Intellectual property created, made, or originated by a faculty member* shall be the sole and exclusive property of the faculty member author or inventor, except as he or she may voluntarily choose to transfer such property, in full, or in part, except as provided below: a. In accepting grants, fellowships, or other donations for research projects from private business or industry and from the federal government, the University generally must obligate itself to such sponsors under invention and patent clauses in the agreement with such sponsors. In these situations, the sponsor and/or the University may be the owner . b. If the University has specifically directed the faculty member to engage in research and a written agreement is entered into between the University and the faculty member, then the resulting intellectual property shall be owned as set forth in such written agreement. c. The University shall own copyright in the following three circumstances: 1. The University expressly directs a faculty member to create a specified work, or the work is created as a specific requirement of employment or as an assigned institutional duty that may, for example, be included in a written job description or an employment agreement. 2. The faculty member author has voluntarily transferred the copyright, in whole or in part to the institution. Such transfer shall be in the form of a written document signed by the faculty member author. 3. The University (including without limitation natural persons, employees, agents, consultants and contractors of the University) contributed to a “joint work” under the Copyright Act. The University can exercise joint ownership under this clause when it has contributed specialized services and facilities to the production of the work that goes beyond what is traditionally provided to faculty members generally in the preparation of their course materials. Such latter arrangement is to be agreed to in writing, in advance, and in full conformance with other provisions of this policy. Intellectual property owned by the University may generally be used by faculty members in the performance of their duties at the University; provided, however, that the University may prohibit such use upon written notice to the faculty member (e.g., in the case where a research sponsor has prohibited such use). Any other faculty member use of intellectual property owned by the University must be approved by the University. Faculty members are encouraged to negotiate with the University a contract which clearly delineates the use and dissemination of any of the above work. Any and all trademarks, service marks, trade names, and other indicia, marks, and designations of the University are the sole and exclusive property of the University. Such marks are not included under the term intellectual property and no rights to any of such marks are granted and/or conveyed to any faculty member hereunder. WHO MAY USE THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY? Material created for ordinary teaching use in the classroom and in department programs, such as syllabi, assignments, and tests, shall remain the property of the faculty author, but the University shall be permitted to use such material for internal instructional, educational, and administrative purposes, including satisfying requests of accreditation agencies for faculty-authored syllabi and course descriptions. In an agreement transferring copyright for such works to a publisher, faculty authors shall provide rights for the University to use such works for internal instructional, educational, and administrative purposes. DISTRIBUTION OF ANY FUNDS GENERATED Funds received by the faculty member from the sale, licensing, rental, lease, and/or other disposition of intellectual property owned by the faculty member author or inventor shall be allocated and expended as determined solely by the faculty member author or inventor. Funds received by the University from the sale, licensing, rental, lease, and/or other disposition of intellectual property owned by the University shall be allocated and expended as determined solely by the University. Funds received by the faculty member and the University from the sale of intellectual property owned jointly by the faculty member and the University shall be allocated and expended in accordance with a specific agreement. If no written agreement is in place, then the parties agree to submit the issue to the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. The parties agree to be bound by the determination of that committee. In the event of multiple creators, the creators will determine the allocation their individual shares when the work is first undertaken. If no written agreement is entered into prior to undertaking the work, then the parties agree to submit the issue to the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. The parties agree to be bound by the determination of that committee. HOW TO RESOLVE EMERGING ISSUES AND DISPUTES The Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee will be composed of six members equally apportioned between faculty (elected by the Faculty Senate) and University administration (appointed by the president or his designee.). The committee members shall elect a chair from among themselves each year and will convene only when called upon to address issues or resolve disputes regarding intellectual property rights. At the time of initial appointment or election, each member shall be designated as serving a one or two, or three-year term, so that the term of one faculty committee member and one administration member will expire each year and replacements will be appointed or elected each year. After the first appointment subsequent members shall serve a three-year term, commencing on July 1 and terminating on June 30. Committee members may serve one additional three-year term. A seventh member shall also be included on the Committee each year. The term of the seventh member shall be for one year commencing on or about July 1 and terminating on the following June 30. The seventh member shall not vote except for the purpose of breaking a tie vote among the other members of the Committee. The seventh member may not be a member of the University or faculty. Such seventh member shall be selected by a majority of the Committee as the first order of business by the Committee at the start of each term (e.g., at the first meeting of the Committee subsequent to July 1). It is recognized that the seventh member may not be called upon to attend every meeting of the Committee and that such seventh member will generally be selected from the local or regional community (e.g., an educator, business person, academic, politician or other person). The Committee shall monitor and review technological and legislative changes affecting intellectual property policy and shall report to relevant faculty and administrative bodies, when such changes affect existing policies. The Committee shall serve as a forum for the receipt and discussion of proposals to change existing institutional policy and/or to provide recommendations for contract negotiations. In many cases where ideas, inventions, and discoveries are produced within the University, it is difficult to trace the origin to a specific individual or individuals and often difficult to determine the relative rights of the individuals and organizations, including the University, involved. Therefore, disputes over ownership, and its attendant rights, of intellectual property will be decided by the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. However, the purpose of this committee is not to address copyright “fair-use” issues. The Committee shall make an initial determination of whether the University or any other party has rights to the invention or other creation, and, if so, the basis and extent of those rights. The Committee shall also make a determination on resolving competing faculty claims to ownership when the parties cannot reach an agreement on their own. The Committee will review the merits of inventions, and other creations, and make recommendations for the management of the invention, including development, patenting, and exploitation. If the University and/or the inventors/creators disagree with the determination of the committee, then the University and/or he/she may appeal to binding arbitration. The cost of the arbitration shall be borne equally by the University and the creator(s). *Note: This policy is intended to apply to all members of the university community – faculty, staff, administration and students. Policy based on suggestions and guidelines created by American Association of University Professors, 1012 Fourteenth Street, NW, Suite #500; Washington, DC 20005 Reviewed by lawyers May, 2002 Recommended to Senate by Faculty Policies Committee May 7, 2002

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