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Graduate Policies

9.11 GRADUATE PRINCIPLES OF ACADEMIC CURRICULAR POLICY
A. Instructors and others contracted to prepare curriculum are to follow the guidelines in Section 9.12, Definitions, for the preparation of course prospecti and course syllabi. The Dean of the appropriate college has the responsibility to keep all graduate course prospecti and course syllabi current. B. Each program must have a research course addressing principles of design, primary sources, data collection and analysis, and research ethics within the context of the program’s discipline. The DPT program’s course will also address evidence-based practice. C. Each program must have an ethics course addressing principles and standards for ethical thinking and practice within the context of the program’s discipline and the Mission of the University. D. Each master’s program and the Doctorate programs must have a Capstone component or an equivalent approved by the Graduate Policies Committee. a. Doctoral Student Capstones (Special Projects and Dissertations) should be planned, executed, and assessed within the parameters of the degree offered. If unclear, reliance on the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes can provide direction. A committee appointed by the Associate Vice President for Graduate will review capstone topics. b. Master Student Capstones (Thesis and Non-thesis) should be planned, executed, and assessed within the parameters of the degree offered. If unclear, reliance on the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes can provide direction. E. All substantive changes made to Graduate Core courses (research, ethics, and capstone) must be approved by the Graduate School via Graduate Policies Committee. F. The Written Comprehensive. a. Ed.S. and Ed.D. students will take a written comprehensive examination (unless they took it in the ED.S. program). Students completing the Ed.S. and the Ed.D. will take one written comprehensive examination. (Students who take the Ed.S. will take the written comprehensive examination and oral defense of the portfolio; students who take the Ed.D. will take one written comprehensive, defense of the portfolio, and defense of the dissertation.) b. DPT students will take written and practical comprehensive examinations at the end of the first and second years of their curriculum. Achieving a passing score is necessary to progress to the second and third years of the curriculum respectively. G. Each program must follow the Graduate Policies Committee Student Handbook guidelines.

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9.12 GRADUATE DEFINITIONS
A. Master’s Degrees: at least 30 credits. (see 9.21 for approved list) B. Specialization: at least 30 credits beyond the Master’s degree. May be earned in: 1. Education – Principal Licensure/Superintendent Licensure (ED.S) C. Doctoral Degree: May be earned in: 1. Physical Therapy (DPT) – 111 credits 2. Education (ED.D) – at least 60 credits D. Certificate is a package of courses available for credit but not typically fulfilling graduation requirements for, e.g., an emphasis. E. Emphasis consists of twelve to sixteen credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study prescribed in the university catalog. F. Church certification consists of a course of study that leads to certification for commissioned ministries in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod (DCE, DPM, DCO, and LCT). G. Credit consists of a semester hour credit. H. Independent study is an educational experience offered for credit outside the regularly scheduled classes. I. Cohort is normally a group of 12 – 15 learners who move through the whole course of study in a program together. 1. Each DPT class is 30 students. J. Graduate Student status 1. “Full-time Graduate Students” are students who have been formally accepted into a graduate degree program and enrolled in a minimum of 6 credits in a semester. 2. “Half-time Graduate Students” are students who have been formally accepted into a graduate degree program and are enrolled in 3 – 5 credits in a semester.” 3. “Visiting students” are those students who have registered for graduate courses but have not been admitted to a program. 4. Students who have not completed all admission requirements for degree- seeking status may register as visiting students until these requirements have been met. K. Offering means that the course or specialization has been approved by the appropriate faculty unit(s) and is taught by Concordia University, St. Paul, faculty. L. Licensure Programs are courses of study that lead to teaching, principal, or superintendent licensure or church work certification (DCE, DPM, DCO, ED.S) or licensure to practice (DPT). M. Faculty who meet the following criteria will be designated as graduate faculty, be eligible to serve on the graduate committee, and have voting privileges in plenary meetings: 1. Graduate faculty will annually be designated by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Associate Vice-President for Graduate Studies, and each of the Collegiate Deans. 2. Faculty not meeting the 3rd criteria (below) for Graduate Faculty status must provide an action plan to the Collegiate Dean and the AVP for Graduate Studies. Upon receipt, the faculty member will be granted one year probationary status. 3. The procedure to regain Graduate Faculty status is to present evidence of the terminal degree, graduate level teaching workload, and research or scholarship in the field or discipline (curriculum vitae) to the Collegiate Dean and AVP for Graduate Studies. Designated Graduate Faculty must meet all of the following 3 criteria: 1. Graduate faculty must hold a terminal degree in an appropriate field of study or at minimum a master’s degree or clinical specialization in an appropriate field of study plus a demonstrated minimum of 10,000 hours of professional experience in the discipline and relevant to the course(s) they are teaching. Determination of “demonstrated professional experience” is made by the program coordinator and associate vice president for graduate studies with final approval from the vice president for academic affairs. Graduate faculty are expected to meet the qualifications set up by relevant accrediting bodies. 2. Graduate faculty will teach graduate level courses on a regular basis or be administratively responsible for an approved graduate program (see FH 9.21). 3. Graduate faculty must be active in research appropriate to the field or discipline. Documentation of research should be submitted to the Graduate School regularly through the scholarship data base (See FH 2.72). Graduate Faculty should meet the following criteria in an ongoing manner: 1. Graduate faculty must have significant professional experience related to degree program or courses of study. 2. Faculty will possess appropriate current experience in graduate level teaching. 3. Graduate faculty must advise graduate students and be willing to serve on graduate student capstone committees. 4. Graduate faculty may serve as members of the graduate Policies Committee. N. Service Loads for graduate faculty will normally be computed in the faculty members’ regular workload. Service loads and overloads for graduate faculty will be coordinated between the deans of the colleges. O. Prospectus is an abbreviated syllabus, a brief proposal for a newly developed course. The prime objective of the prospectus is to give the rationale and purpose of the course in terms of program and student needs. The prospectus should include the following information: 1. Course title and number, course description, and number of credits 2. Prerequisites 3. Rationale for the course in the specific program or curriculum 4. Specific objectives of the course and its relationship to the department, college and university 5. Outline of units 6. Course assessment procedures 7. Bibliography of learning materials: texts, course materials, library resources 8. Date of prospectus approval by the department and the dean of the college. P. Syllabus is a cognitive map or blueprint for a course. It is to include the objectives for the course, the means by which the objectives are to be achieved, and the assessment procedures for measuring the achievement of the objectives. The syllabus should include the topics and use the format that follows: I. The mission of the university: The mission of Concordia University, a university of The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, is to prepare students for thoughtful and informed living, for dedicated service to God and humanity, and for enlightened care of God’s creation, all within the context of the Christian Gospel. II. Course number; section number; course title III. Prerequisites/co-requisites IV. Credit hours V. Contact hours per week: number of lectures, laboratories, individualized instruction, conference, clinics, field placements, co-op hours; chat, etc. VI. Instructor’s name, office location, college telephone numbers and instructor’s extension number, voice mail, e-mail and fax numbers VII. Office/contact hours VIII. University catalog course description IX. Instructor’s course description (optional) X. Instructional goals and objectives XI. Student goals and objectives (optional) XII. Instructor’s educational philosophy (optional) XIII. Teaching procedures (optional) XIV. Attendance and tardiness policies XV. Classroom atmosphere XVI. Required texts (annotated list optional) XVII. Supplementary reading: material on reserve or recommended reading XVIII. Assessment. Criteria for student grading; explanation of instructor’s evaluation instruments: class participation, quizzes, tests, papers, reports, labs, projects, chat rooms, bulletin boards; policies on late assignments; makeup, work for extra credit, plagiarism; students with disabilities XIX. Support services: libraries; labs, tutors, transfer, career and personal counseling; Campus Ministry; advisors XX. Course outline XXI. Extras: grade-recording sheet, student sign-off sheet, letter to students, textbook preview, calendar, maps, timelines XXII. Course Administration Information (e.g., maximum number of students, specific classroom or other facility requirements) Q. Course numbering for graduate credit will be indicated by a 500 or higher designation. In courses designated undergraduate/graduate there shall be a section of the syllabus clearly designating graduate requirements. 1. DPT, ED.S. and ED.D. program courses will be indicated by a 7000 or higher designation. O. Course delivery methods for programs: CLASSROOM or ONSITE DELIVERY: Courses offered in a classroom setting where students and instructors meet face-to-face on published dates. Course management software may be used to supplement resources, report student progress, etc. An online assignment or substitute activity does not constitute a significant portion of course activity. DISTANCE or ONLINE DELIVERY: Courses are specifically designed for and structured around course management software (e.g. WebCT, Blackboard). Students are not expected to meet together for learning activities. (A program residency, even with a course component, does not change the ONLINE nature of the program.). BLENDED DELIVERY: Each course in the program has designated ONSITE and ONLINE weeks of activity. Because of the specialized content of certain courses, a few courses may be entirely ONSITE or entirely ONLINE.

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9.13 PRINCIPLIES OF GRADUATE STUDY
Coursework at the graduate level is not just different classes than the undergraduate. It is not simply more information on a particular topic. It is designed to be a qualitatively different experience. Concordia University has accepted these principles as the practical ways graduate education will be delivered at Concordia. 1. Graduate coursework is more creative. Students create systems that will help them to be a more effective professional. 2. Graduate coursework is more self-directed. In many assignments, students decide how to fashion an assignment to help them apply and synthesize the material more appropriately. 3. Graduate coursework is more rigorous. More is expected of the graduate student than of the certificate or undergraduate student. 4. Graduate coursework is more attentive to epistemological issues. More attention is given to “how we know what we know,” and to how we prove and support what we know. Skills of discernment and critical thinking are needed. 5. Graduate coursework is more attentive to research. Students will be exploring (and conducting) new research. They will read and critique original research. 6. Graduate coursework is more a community of learners, rather than merely a teacher-student relationship. Graduate students are assumed to have reached an intellectual maturity that puts them at a place where the role of the instructor is different. Instructors do not have to spoon-feed or hand-hold; instructors need to guide and mentor the mature student in the direction that the student has identified. 7. Graduate students give careful consideration to research, information, and bibliographic references. The skills of knowledge navigation are increasingly important in the years ahead, and graduate students know how to find the knowledge they need. 8. Graduate learning is not just remembering information, it is constructing knowledge. The community of learners opens new insights and creates new knowledge in the field. 9. Graduate professors are actively engaged in research and learning. This helps them maintain a cutting edge in their profession. “It is the role of graduate education to explore and advance the limits of knowledge and to define the state of the art in every field. Its purpose is to serve society’s needs in specific technical and professional ways, but also to serve the need for intellectual expansion. Graduate education is a major source of future intellectual leaders of society…” Adapted from Organization and Administration of Graduate Education: A Policy Statement, Council of Graduate Schools

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9.14 CHANGING GRADUATE CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS
A. Changing a Course 1. The individual instructor may make non-substantive course revisions for upgrading and updating. 2. If the course objectives or purpose of the class are to be altered, the chair of the department is to approve the revisions. A revised syllabus that has been approved by the department chair shall be submitted to the dean of the college. 3. When the change involves courses related to teacher licensure, the department sponsoring the course should consult with the department of teacher education unit, and as needed to the appropriate state regulatory agencies responsible for licensure. 4. The dean of the college communicates the approved changes as needed to the faculty, staff and/or students. 5. An Academic Change Form should be submitted to the registrar when changes to course title, number, description or grading procedure is needed. B. Proposals for making a substantive change* to a graduate core requirement (research, ethics, and capstone course) must be approved in the following sequence: 1. College / Collegiate Dean 2. Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies 3. Graduate Policies Committee. 4. An Academic Change Form should be submitted to the registrar. * Questions regarding degree of change requiring GPC approval should be coordinated through the office of the Associate Vice President for Graduate Education. C. Changing the requirements of a graduate certificate, graduate program or program emphasis. 1. The department that is proposing the change consults all other graduate departments affected by the change. 2. The department may propose the change of a course(s) or addition of course options within credit limits set by the Graduate Policies Committee. Proposals exceeding credit limits must be approved by the College, Associate Vice President for Graduate Enrollment, and the Graduate Polices Committee. 3. If the changes do not affect the total number of credit hours, purpose of program, or involve the graduate core by the faculty, only department and dean of the college approval are needed. 4. When approval is obtained, the Collegiate Dean or Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies notifies the appropriate faculty members, administrators, and publications. 5. An Academic Change Form should be submitted to the registrar.

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9.15 PROGRAM INTEGRITY AND RESPONSIBILITY TO GRADUATE POLICY
The Graduate Program Department Chair/Coordinator is responsible for: ● The content of the learning outcomes and curriculum for the graduate programs in their respective areas. ● For knowing, understanding, and implementing approved Graduate policies and procedures. ● For demonstrating to the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) how programs meet Graduate policies and procedures. The AVP-GS reports specifically how each program is responding to the approved graduate policies, procedures and initiatives to the Graduate Policies Committee. Programs failing to meet approved policies, procedures, and initiatives the following actions may be taken: 1. During this probationary period, the Graduate Policies Committee may propose to the Collegiate Dean the Program Coordinator /Department Chair be placed on probationary status for a period of no less than six months. a. Probationary status will be reported to the Collegiate Dean, VPAA, and the Senior Vice President (SVP). b. Graduate faculty on probation would be ineligible: to teach overload courses; advance in rank; and serve on University committees. c. Probation may include the following actions, dependent upon the extent of the violation: suspension of budgetary resources; removal from Chair/Coordinator position; or University contract not renewed. 2. The graduate program can be suspended from Graduate Policies Committee (GPC) program approval for a period of six months and/or until the requirement(s) is satisfactorily met as determined by the AVP-GS and the Graduate Policies Committee. a. Program suspension will be reported to the Faculty Senate Chair person, Collegiate Dean, VPAA, and the SVP. b. Once the program has satisfactorily responded to graduate program policies and/or procedures, the lifted suspension will be reported to the Faculty Senate. 3. Persistent failure to support Graduate Policies may culminate in removal from approved graduate program status (FH. 9.21). a. Removal would be reported to the Faculty Senate Chair person, Collegiate Dean, VPAA, and the SVP. b. The Program Coordinator /Department Chair maybe returned to good standing once the program has satisfactorily responded to graduate program policies, procedures and/or initiatives and has produced sufficient evidence support such. 4. Appeals to program suspension and faculty probation are made in writing to the Collegiate Dean. Appeals are considered by the Graduate Policies Appeals Committee. 5. The Program Coordinator /Department Chair may present evidence of program change(s) reflecting Graduate Policies and Procedures to the Collegiate Dean and the AVP-GS who will verify changes on behalf of the Graduate Policies Committee. The AVP-GS will report confirmed changes to the Graduate Policies Committee. a. Once the program has been approved in meeting the requirements, the probationary period may be ended along with any imposed sanctions. b. The end of suspension and probation will be reported to the Faculty Senate Chair, Collegiate Dean, VPAA, and SVP. c. If a graduate program is placed on probation twice within a three year period, an external program review will be initiated by the AVP-GS in conjunction with the Graduate Policies Committee as to the feasibility of continuing as an approved graduate program at the University. Definition – Good Standing 1. Programs a. Reflect Principles of Graduate Education b. Have an updated, relevant Graduate Core c. Have synthesized the Graduate School Student Outcomes in the scope and sequence of their curriculum and can show evidence of such in the Capstone. d. Are diligent in meeting the annual Graduate School program initiatives. e. Eligible for Graduate Assistant support. 2. Graduate Faculty a. Be active in research appropriate to the field or discipline b. Be involved in professional experience related to degree program or courses of study. c. Will continue to expand relevant skills in graduate level teaching. d. Will advise graduate students and be willing to serve on graduate student capstone committees. e. Are eligible for reduced teaching loads to pursue research agenda.

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9.21 GRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED
A. Master of Arts in Education Emphases: 1. Early Childhood 2. Differentiated Instruction 3. Educational Technology 4. Curriculum and Instruction w/ K-12 Reading Endorsement 5. Curriculum and Instruction – General 6. Education Leadership 7. Special Education with SLD, EBD, or ASD licensure B. Master of Arts in Teaching – Initial K-6 Licensure C. Master of Arts in Family Science D. Master of Arts in Sport Management E. Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Leadership F. Master of Arts in Leadership and Management G. Master of Arts in Human Resources Management H. Master of Business Administration Emphasis: 1. Health Care Management 2. Health Care Compliance 3. Information Technology Management I. Master of Arts in Strategic Communication Management J. Master of Science in Information Technology Management K. Master of Arts in Human Services Emphases: 1. Forensic Behavioral Health 2. Forensic Behavioral Health Certificate L. Master of Science in Exercise Science M.Master of Science in Orthotics and Prosthetics N. Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing O. Educational Specialist Emphases: 1. Principal Licensure 2. Superintendent Licensure P. Doctor of Physical Therapy Q. Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Administration Leadership, General.

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9.22 GRADUATE ASSESSMENT
A. Annual Assessment 1. Graduate programs of the university will be assessed annually. 2. Program directors, department chairs, or emphasis coordinators will be responsible for the implementation of assessment plans. B. Annual assessment reports will be provided to the associate dean of university assessment and to the dean of the college in which the program is offered.

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9.23 GRADUATE ACCREDITATION
A. Concordia University is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Institutions of Higher Education, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504, Tel. 800-621- 7440. B. Programs educating individuals to work with PK-12 students are designed to be accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). C. The DPT program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).

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9.24 PROPOSALS FOR NEW GRADUATE COURSES, EMPHASES, PROGRAMS OR DEGREES
A. Introducing a New Course in an Existing Program 1. An instructor may, in consultation with the department, develop a new course. 2. Courses maybe taught on an experimental basis with a prospectus with approval of the department and the dean of the college. 3. Before a new course is taught for the second time, the department shall review and approve the syllabus. Upon approval, the department chair shall furnish copies of the syllabus to the dean of the college. 4. The dean of the college shall determine whether the course and the syllabus are in harmony with faculty policy, Principles of Graduate Education, and institutional objectives and is authorized to delay the offering of the course if the syllabus is unacceptable. As necessary, the dean of the college shall consult with department chairs and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies in order to resolve problems that may arise. In cases where institutional policy conflicts with the plans of a department, the Graduate Policies Committee will examine the problem and recommend policy changes. 5. When the change involves courses related to teacher licensure, the department sponsoring the course should consult with the department of teacher education unit, and as needed to the appropriate state regulatory agencies responsible for licensure. 6. After approval of the course syllabus by the department and the dean of the college, the dean of the college shall announce to the faculty the adoption of the course into the curriculum in regular publication for faculty and staff and shall list it in the next catalog. Course descriptions will normally be printed in the catalog for those courses that are offered regularly and for which a syllabus has been approved. 7. Criteria for Acceptance of New Courses. In terms of criteria for the acceptance of a new course, the proposed course will do one or more of the following: a. help meet the mission of the university and college and their general objectives in a way not already offered through an existing course; b. reflect the Principles of Graduate Education; c. be fiscally feasible in terms of staffing and instructional materials resources; d. meet state of Minnesota licensure requirements (if applicable); e. afford opportunity to utilize resources due to the college’s geographic locations; f. contribute to the curriculum in a meaningful way as evidenced by research; g. add depth to a presently set emphasis, certificate or degree; h. fill specific needs expressed by students/graduates; i. serve as an enrichment opportunity in the overall learning experiences of the student; j. provide opportunity for particular faculty members to utilize their expertise; k. provide special opportunity for experimentation with innovative methodology; l. strengthen a particular academic field; m. contribute to the development of graduate opportunities for leadership development for community and/or church. All new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should demonstrate an affirmative response to the following questions. 5 gates for consideration of new academic programs 1. Is there a market for the new program? 2. Do we have the capacity to deliver? 3. If we don’t have the internal capacity, who is our external partner? 4. How does it fit with university mission, vision, and promise? 5. Will it contribute to the revenue stream of the University? Proposers for new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should consult with the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies in preparation for the written proposal. The general outline for the proposal is listed below. In addition, proposers should follow the “calendar steps” leading to approval of the proposal. Developing new courses for a new graduate program. Courses should be developed based on the approved proposal. Steps: 1. For each course, faculty should be identified, having the content expertise to complete the task. 2. The syllabus and course should be developed concurrently. a. The course should be developed in the Learning Management System (Blackboard) in alignment with the standard template. b. Content and assignments should be included in the course. 3. The syllabus and course should be peer reviewed. One member from the department (who is able to comment thoughtfully on the content), and one from outside the department (someone from the college who has online learning experience). Reviewers’ names and dates should be included in a footer. 4. Submit syllabus and course to dean for final approval. Stipend request. 5. The creator of the syllabus and course should expect to teach the course the first time. 6. Revisions to the syllabus and course, based on instructor review and student feedback, should be made and sent to the department chair or dean for final approval. Stipend request. B. Introducing a New Emphasis 1. The emphasis shall support the mission of the university. 2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the emphasis. 3. New Emphases shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review. 4. The Emphasis should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome project. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee. C. Introducing a New Certificate Program 1. The certificate shall support the mission of the university. 2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the certificate. 3. The certificate program, a package of courses available for credit shall support the mission of the university. 4. New certificates shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review. 5. The Certificate should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome project. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee. D. Introducing a New Program or Degree 1. The program or degree shall support the mission of the university. 2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the program or degree. 3. Board of Regents can request and approve development of an academic program or degree, LCMS 3.8.3.6.4 (LCMS Handbook). 4. President can make academic program recommendations to the Board of Regents, LCMS 3.8.3.7 (LCMS Handbook). 5. New programs or degrees shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review. 6. The program or degree should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome Capstone. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee. E. Procedures for the Approval of New Courses, Emphases, Certificate Programs and Degrees. The Graduate Policies Committee, in cooperation with other units of the university, establishes the procedures by which new courses, emphases, certificate programs and degrees are developed. F. Procedure for undergraduate / graduate program development. The institution’s policy and practice assure that at least 50% of courses applied to a graduate program are courses designed for graduate work, rather than undergraduate courses credited toward a graduate degree. (An institution may allow well-prepared advanced students to substitute its graduate courses for required or elective courses in an undergraduate degree program and then subsequently count those same courses as fulfilling graduate requirements in a related graduate program that the institution offers. In “4+1” or “2+3” programs, at least 50% of the credits allocated for the master’s degree – usually 15 of 30 – must be for courses designed for graduate work.). [from the Higher Learning Commission]

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9.24, Form 1 Overview and Introduction for New Graduate Courses, Emphases, Certificates, or Degrees
1. In 1-2 paragraphs describe the key dynamics — institutional mission and internal or external forces — that stimulated and shaped this proposal. 2. Discuss how this program would help realize Concordia’s Mission and Promise to Students. Characteristics of the proposed program 1. The full name of the proposed program, the specific degree or the instructional level (if not a degree program), and the six-digit CIP code of the program. Consult with AVP of Assessment and Accreditation for CIP codes. 2. The total credit hours for completion of the program: 3. Normal or typical length of time for students to complete the program: 4. The proposed initial date for implementation of the program: 5. The primary target audience for the program (e.g., full-time, part-time, traditional college age, working adults, transfer students, military personnel, or particular ethnic group) 6. The projected life of the program (limited number of terms or ongoing): 7. Whether the program will be part of a contractual or consortial arrangement (please see chart below). Identify External Accreditation, Advisory Groups, and/or Key Partnerships Supporting the Program If you are planning any involvement by external organizations (other than accredited higher education institutions) in key operations as identified below, provide the information requested for each planned involvement. (Note that such involvement by a parent company or by one of its subsidiaries external to the institution in any of these operations should be reported.) Type of involvement Name(s) of external organization(s) % of Involvement A. Recruitment and admission of students B. Course placement and advising of students C. Design and oversight of curriculum D. Direct instruction and oversight E. Other support for delivery of instruction Institution’s History with Programs 1. Does the institution currently offer a program at the same instructional level and with the same 4-digit CIP code (XX.XX) as the proposed program? If so, identify the program currently offered and whether it is a degree program. Will the proposed program replace the program currently offered? 2. Does the institution currently offer two or more programs at the same instructional level with same 2-digit CIP code (XX.) as the proposed program? If so, identify the two such programs with the highest numbers of graduates during the past year, along with their numbers of graduates. Institutional Planning for Program Change 1. Briefly describe the planning process for determining the need for this new program, including the role of faculty in the planning and approval process. 2. What are the physical facilities and equipment needed to support the program? Indicate the impact that the proposed change will have on the physical resources and laboratories that currently accommodate existing programs and services, or identify new laboratory and preceptor needs. 3. What is the evidence that a market for the new program(s) exists? How has estimated program demand been factored into realistic enrollment projections? How has this evidence been used in planning and budgeting processes to develop a quality program that can be sustained? 4. If the program request is approved, what future growth do you anticipate (e.g., in the next six months, three years) and how do you plan to manage this growth? 5. How does this program fit into the current and expected financial picture of the institution? In particular, will the program be financially self-sufficient within three years? If not, when do you expect the program to be financially self-sufficient and how do you expect the program to operate until then? 6. What controls are in place to ensure that the information presented to students in advertising, brochures, and other communications will be accurate? For example: Program Cost Model Academic Year 13/14 14/15 15/16 16/17 17/18 Number of Students 15 30 40 40 40 Credits Generated – 8 per semester: Fall 120 240 320 320 320 Spring 120 240 320 320 320 Summer 120 240 320 320 320 Cost per credit $460 $470 $480 $490 $500 Total Revenue $165,60 0 $338,40 0 $460,80 0 $470,40 0 $480,00 0 Salaries $50,000 $80,000 $150,00 0 $200,00 0 $250,00 0 Other expenses $50,000 $70,000 $90,000 $110,00 0 $130,00 0 Total Expenses $100,00 0 $140,00 0 $275,00 0 $350,00 0 $400,00 0 Profit/(Loss) $65,600 $198,40 0 $185,80 0 $120400 $80,000 Curriculum and Instructional Design 1. Please list the Program Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes. 2. Please list all the courses that comprise the program. Include course descriptions and number of credit hours for each. 3. What are the requirements students must fulfill to complete the program successfully (including specific courses, course options, and any other requirements)? Total number of credits for the program? 4. For programs using prior learning credit, compressed time frames, online delivery, accelerated formats, or other innovative approaches to learning, explain how the institution will ensure that student work and the levels of knowledge and competencies comparable to those required in traditional formats have been achieved? Institutional Staffing, Faculty, and Student Support 1. How many and what types (full-time, part-time, adjunct) of faculty will be employed in the program? Why is the number of full-time faculty members adequate to support the program? 2. What will the impact of the new initiative have on faculty workload? 3. Provide a brief attachment that inventories each faculty member employed to teach in the program, including names of existing personnel, a description of each faculty member’s academic qualifications, their prior instructional responsibility and other experiences relevant to the courses they will teach in the program in question, each faculty member’s course load in the new program, and the course work each teaches in other programs currently offered. 4. Document scholarship and research capability of each faculty member; for doctoral programs, document faculty experience in directing student research. 5. What library and information resources—general as well as specific to the program(s)—and staffing and services are in place to support the initiative? If the proposed new program is at the graduate level, document discipline-specific refereed journals and primary source materials. The Concordia University Library Technology Center (http://concordia.csp.edu/Library/) is a member of Cooperating Libraries in Consortium (CLIC http://www.clic.edu/). CLIC consists of eight member universities that share a common library catalog called CLICnet (http://clicnet.clic.edu/). CLICnet provides access to nearly 2,000,000 resources in CLIC member libraries, including books and journals in both print and electronic formats. Twice daily courier service delivers CLIC resources from library to library. Reference services are available in person, by phone, email and instant messaging. Online reference chat is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week as the library is a member of AskMN, a 24/7 online reference chat cooperative (http://askmn.org/). In addition to in-person bibliographic and research instruction, the reference staff utilizes WebEx for instruction to online courses. The Concordia University Library Technology Center currently subscribes to numerous databases that would support a xxxxxxxxx program. These database subscriptions include: In addition to the books available through CLICnet, the Concordia University Library Technology Center also has subscriptions to the following ebook collections: Ebrary; eBooks on EBSCOhost; NCBI Bookshelf; and Credo Reference. In addition to the many full-text journals available through our database subscriptions, the Concordia University Library Technology Center subscribes to the following journals: (Include relevant journals) xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx For those journals and books that we do not have in our collection, the Library Technology Center offers an interlibrary loan service (ILLiad) to our students, staff and faculty. Evaluation 1. Describe the process for monitoring, evaluating, and improving the overall effectiveness and quality of the program. 2. Describe the process for assessing and improving student learning, including student persistence and completion, in the new program. Sign Offs, along with supportive statements by: Each step should include a copy of meeting minutes or written statement endorsing the graduate program. Calendar Step in process Completi on Date Attached Statement or Minutes Program Proposers College Graduate Faculty & Collegiate Dean Graduate Admissions: Assoc VP Cohort Enroll Mgmt Associate Vice President for Assessment And Accreditation Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies Vice President for Academic Affairs Senior Vice President Graduate Council Report to Faculty Senate Concordia University System

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9.32 ADMISSION TO A GRADUATE PROGRAM
A. Each program shall require the following: 1. Documentation of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution (e.g., Higher Learning Commission) or nationally accredited institutions recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and the U.S. Department of Education (e.g., Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools) and transcripts from any institution attended since baccalaureate. a. Applicants who are within one month or in their last course of completing their baccalaureate degree, may petition the respective graduate program chair for provisional admittance to a graduate program. b. If the baccalaureate degree is not completed as stipulated in the approved petition, the student will be dismissed from the program at the end of the course in which the student is currently enrolled. 2. An overall G.P.A. of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale. 3. An application and prescribed tuition prepayment. 4. Provisional Acceptance: Students who don’t meet minimum admission criteria may be admitted on a provisional basis with the approval of the Graduate Admission Committee. a. Doctoral students will begin the program on academic probation and will be dismissed from the program if they do not meet the 3.0 GPA standard the first semester. B. Potential students in post-graduate programs at Concordia University must be interviewed by the Program Director or an appointed designee, prior to admittance into the program. The interview should be in person and completed far enough in advance to permit the normal application process enough time to proceed to its conclusion. The following are to be a part of the interview: 1. Ensure that the potential student’s GPA is at least 3.25 in a master’s degree program from a regionally accredited academic institution. 2. Review the application form to discuss or clarify any information as necessary. 3. Review transcripts to determine which (if any) credits would transfer into the program. 4. Review professional recommendations and discuss any questionable statements. 5. Discuss prior administrative experiences. 6. Discuss professional goals. 7. Review program requirements. Based on the personal interview, application materials, and professional recommendations: , this student: _ This student is recommended for the credential program. _ This student is not recommended for the credential program. Signature: ___________________________________ Date: _________________________(Program Director) C. The DPT program requires set prerequisite courses, clinical observation hours, the GRE, and an interview as part of its application process. D. Additional requirements for specific programs will be outlined in the program handbook.

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9.33 ENROLLMENT BY CSP FACULTY AND STAFF
Faculty and staff employees of Concordia University are encouraged to enroll in graduate programs of the University. This enrollment is considered a benefit and is governed by policies of the Department of Human Resources. Guidelines for enrollment include: a. One employee or spouse per learner cohort. b. CSP employees or spouse will be assigned to cohorts on a space available basis. c. CSP employees or spouse must fulfill all requirements for admission to graduate programs.

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9.34 INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE STUDENTS
1. International students must provide proof of English proficiency (if English is not the student’s first language). This can be established in the following ways: a. Completion of Level 112 at an ELS (English Language School) or Mastery Level at Global Language Institute (GLI) b. Completion of Level 6 at an approved English school c. TOEFL- iBT score of 78 or TOEFL PBT score of 547 d. An equated score of 80 or better on the Michigan Test e. IELTS overall band score of 6 or higher (International English Language Testing System). 2. English Proficiency would be accepted based on the additional standard: Completion of an undergraduate or graduate degree at an accredited college or university in the US, English-speaking Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, or New Zealand.

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9.35 UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION TO GRADUATE COURSES
Normally undergraduate students are not permitted to enroll in graduate courses without being admitted to the graduate program.

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9.37 TRANSFER GRADUATE CREDIT
Up to 6 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the MA (MS). The credits must be appropriate to the student’s program and the course(s) must be equivalent to the course(s) in the program (i.e. outcomes (objectives) need to match). Application for transfer of credit is made by the student to the Advisor. The credits must be certified by the Registrar and approved for the degree program by the program director. 1. Up to 9 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the Ed.S. 2. Up to 12 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the Ed.D. 3. Normally no credits will be accepted for transfer into the DPT program. 4. Only courses with a grade of B or better may be accepted for transfer credit. 5. Normally credits older than five years will not be accepted. 6. The chair of the graduate program or designee will make the determination whether a student is required to audit a course in place of taking the course for a grade. 7. Students taking graduate level courses as part of a Concordia University – St. Paul graduate certificate, approved by the Graduate Policies Committee, may apply the entire graduate certificate’s credits to the graduate program to which it is connected. Specific programs and/or departments may establish institutional articulation agreements with other accredited institutions. Proposals outlining such agreements should be presented to the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, who will report such to the Graduate Policies Committee prior to approval.

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9.41 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) POLICY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
A. To achieve satisfactory academic progress, a graduate student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average (CGPA) and complete a minimum cumulative of 67% of all attempted graduate level coursework. Incompletes (I) and withdrawals (W) do not count toward completion. B. When a student does not maintain satisfactory progress, the University will impose certain restrictions that will affect the student’s eligibility for enrollment. 1. Academic Probation: Academic probation is a formal warning that students did not achieve satisfactory progress. Students will be notified of their probation status in writing by the Registrar. Academic probation status appears on the student’s internal records, but it is not part of the permanent transcript. a. Doctoral students are only allowed one semester of academic probation throughout their curriculum. 2. Academic Disqualification: Academic disqualification occurs when students do not meet satisfactory academic progress requirements for two consecutive terms. Students will be notified of their disqualification in writing by the Registrar. Students are ineligible to register for subsequent terms. Students may appeal to be re-admitted by completing the Disqualification Appeal Form. C. Disqualification Appeal Process: An appeal form must be submitted to the Graduate Academic Appeals Committee. The Graduate Academic Appeals Committee will decide approval or denial of students who are appealing their academic disqualification. Appeals must be submitted on the Disqualification Appeal Form and submitted to the academic appeals committee at least two weeks before the start of the term for which the student desires readmission. The appeal must state what undue hardship caused the student’s inability to meet satisfactory progress standards. Only special extenuating circumstances will be considered. Students must also explain how they propose to remedy their situation. If the appeal is successful, the student is readmitted on probationary status. Appeals are approved for one term only. Specific information in writing must document any appeal. The committee reviews each case and decides if the appeal is valid, the decision is announced to the student in writing, is final and not subject to further appeal.

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9.42 GRADUATE ATTENDANCE POLICIES
The Graduate School assumes that all registered students have freely accepted personal responsibility for regular class attendance. Students are expected to attend all class meetings and laboratory sessions for the courses in which they are enrolled. In cases of emergencies and/or unforeseen circumstances students are expected to notify their instructors and arrange for any possible “makeup” assignments; however, instructors are not required to allow for such “makeup” assignments. All graduate programs/courses will have a stated attendance policy included in each syllabus. Additional attendance guidelines and requirements for graduate students: • While it is the student’s responsibility to communicate with the instructor regarding an absence, if the instructor has not heard from the student, and the student is not participating, the instructor should attempt to contact the student and the program’s academic advisor. • If a student knows in advance that he/she will be missing class, he/she is required: o to contact the professor as soon as possible before the absence o to complete any assignments due during his/her absence before departing for the planned absence o to gather missed materials from classmates as soon as possible upon his/her return o to communicate any concerns regarding the course content that was missed to the professor • If a student must miss a class/chat because of an emergency or illness, he/she is required: o to contact the professor in order to identify and complete his/her regular assignment(s) o to complete a make-up assignment that contributes to the subject being studied and enhances the class-learning environment • A missed class/chat may be made up for partial credit. • If a student misses two classes/chats, the instructor and the student need to discuss the student’s ability to complete the course. In addition, the student will be required to complete his/her regular assignment(s) and extra work. Specific procedures should be outlined in the syllabus. • Any additional absences will require retaking the course. The student will be billed and a grade will be issued each time the course is taken. • Regular attendance is a key factor in determining the continuing financial aid support. Attendance will be used to calculate the amount of aid to be returned if a student used Financial Aid (Title IV) and student discontinues enrollment or withdraws. • Instructors understand the uncertainty of military requirements and other contractual obligations, and they will work with the student to meet educational goals. • It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to make appropriate arrangements. • All Chats and/or Web Ex sessions will be recorded as part of Financial Aid (Title IV) requirement to verify the last date of attendance. • Students with short or long-term disability concerns that may affect attendance should register with Student Accessibility Services. However, course participation is essential to courses and generally expected in accordance with this policy.

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9.43 GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
A. A master’s degree graduate degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 30 semester credits with a grade-point average of 3.00 or better. All master’s students must pass their Capstone at 80% or higher. B. A Doctor of Physical Therapy degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 100 semester credits beyond a bachelor’s degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. C. An Educational Specialist degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 30 semester credits beyond a master’s degree with a grade point average of 3.25 or better. D. An Educational Doctorate degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 60 semester credits beyond a master’s degree with a grade point average of 3.25 or better. E. All post-graduate students must meet the approval of their Capstone or Dissertation committee.

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9.44 GRADUATE ADVISOR AND COMMITTEE
A. Advisor 1. All students will be assigned an advisor. 2. All students shall receive academic advice from a graduate CSP faculty person. B. Committee 1. A student’s committee shall consist of a committee chair and one or two readers approved by the program director. 2. The chair of the committee shall be CSP graduate faculty. 3. Exceptions shall be approved by the program director.

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9.45 GRADING – GRADUATE PROGRAM
A. Grading 1. Grade reports are available online at the end of each course. 2. Conceptual Grading Standards in the Graduate School The grade of C indicates that the student showed a fair understanding of the material and was able to express that understanding clearly and accurately. However, this level of understanding does not meet graduate level expectations. Assignments were completed on time, and for multiple segment work (e.g., discussion board posts) there were sufficient entries to show consistent effort and understanding. The grade of B indicates that the student not only showed a fair understanding and diligence, but went beyond a fair understanding, able to extend the knowledge to other situations, making application between the material and other concepts and contexts. The expression of these ideas shows greater depth of understanding and critical thinking. The grade of A indicates a superior level of understanding of the material and expression of ideas, with a depth of critical thinking, synthesis and evaluation on issues such that the individual shows a professional level of understanding of the material. ● The above should be included in all graduate syllabi. The following scale is used in evaluating a student’s work: A Superior 4 grade points B Good 3 grade points C Fair 2 grade points F Failure 0 grade points I In-Progress 0 grade points W Withdraw 0 grade points P Pass Not included in grade point calculations N No-pass Not included in grade point calculations 3. In-Progress Grades a. A student not completing required coursework before the end of a course may, at the discretion of the instructor, receive an “In-progress” (I) grade for the course. The student must complete an “In-Progress Request Form” and have it approved by the course instructor and the Program Director or Chair. b. “In-Progress” grades for courses graded on a Pass/No Pass basis are converted to “No pass” (N) grades, and courses graded A-F are converted to an F if a final grade has not been submitted by the time period agreed upon by student and instructor. c. Students may not carry more than two “In-Progress” grades at any one time. B. Repeating a Course A student may repeat a course in which a grade of C, N or F has been earned upon approval by the program director and the college dean. While all grades remain on the student’s academic record and transcript, only the highest grade awarded will be used in calculating the student’s grade point average. C. Withdrawing 1. A student may request the grade of “W” before a course is 80% complete, based upon the course calendar. If the course is more than 80% complete, the student’s grade is calculated based upon graded components stated in the syllabus. 2. Withdrawing from a class may have financial implications. Consult the University Catalog. D. Changing or Appealing a Grade After It Has Been Issued Errors in recording or miscalculation must be changed no later than the end of the semester following the error. Grade changes must have accompanying documentation and be approved by the Department or Program Chair and the Dean of the College in which the program resides. Students who wish to appeal a final grade will follow the procedures found in FH 9.47. The appeal must be initiated no later than 5 university business days after grades are officially posted by the registrar’s office. The appeal of a grade must follow the appeals process found in FH 9.47. E. Graduate Academic Appeals Committee The Graduate Policies Committee serves as a group of faculty and administrators to hear student academic and non-academic appeals. If students believe an academic or nonacademic action has been taken, the student may follow the appeal procedures outlined in FH policies 9.47 and 9.66.

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9.46 GRADUATE PROGRAM COMPLETION TIME LIMITS
A. Master’s degree programs must be completed within five years of the beginning of the first course. B. Ed.S. degree programs must be completed within six years of the beginning of the first course. C. Ed.D. degree programs must be completed within seven years of the beginning of the first course. D. DPT degree programs must be completed within four years of the beginning of the first course.

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9.47 APPEAL OF GRADUATE POLICY AND PROCEDURE
A. The Graduate Appeals Committee Appointed by the Associate Vice President (AVP) for Graduate Studies, the Graduate Appeals Committee will hear the appeal and review all relevant documents. The AVP may request additional documentation from the student and/or other departments within the University. The Graduate Appeals Committee will consist of the AVP for Graduate Studies, the registrar, the AVP for Graduate Enrollment, a member from the Graduate Policies Committee, and a Collegiate Dean. This committee will review all academic disqualification appeals for graduate students. B. Graduate students may appeal decisions made by program faculty or administrators regarding disqualification, re-admission, grade change, or academic integrity regarding entry into a program, continuation in a program, or questions that may arise as a result of a candidate’s academic performance in a program. C. Steps for making an appeal (re-admission, grade course change, or academic integrity). 1. Student submits completed Appeal of Academic Dishonesty Graduate Form to the Dean’s Office. 2. The Dean reviews the form and determines if appeal should be granted based on stated reason for appeal. a. If Request for Appeal is denied, the Dean will email the student with reason for denial. b. If Request` for Appeal is approved, the Dean will email the student and followup. 3. If denied, the student may appeal the decision to the Graduate Appeals Committee. a. Submit appeal to the Associate Vice-President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) for consideration by the Graduate Academic Appeals Committee. b. If Request for Appeal is denied, the AVP-GS will email the student with reason for denial. c. If Request for Appeal is approved, the AVP-GS will email the student and followup. 4. Final Appeal Option a. If denied, the student may appeal a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If appeal is denied, the student can appeal the decision a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. b. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will review the case and email the student of decision and reason. c. No further appeals are allowed after this decision.

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9.51 UNIVERSITY AND GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
A. Students must complete all requirements as specified by the program. B. In addition, the following university policies must be completed: 1. 3.0 GPA 2. Transcript documenting completion of all program requirements 3. Documentation of payment of all tuition and fees.

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9.52 DATE FOR GRADUATE TRANSCRIPTS AND DIPLOMA
Transcripts and diplomas will reflect the degree awarded and the term date during which all academic work was completed.

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9.53 COMPLETION OF GRADUATE REQUIREMENTS
A. Candidates who complete all course requirements within 30 calendar days following the end of a regular academic term at Concordia University are listed as graduates of that term. B. Degree requirements are completed when all grades for course have been filed and recorded by the Registrar.

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9.54 GRADUATE COMMENCEMENT
A. Students will be invited to participate in the annual commencement ceremony in May providing all coursework will be completed by the forthcoming September. B. Students who are unable to participate in the May ceremony may graduate in absentia. C. The graduation/capstone fee will be assessed regardless of participation in the graduation ceremony.

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9.62 RESEARCH WITH HUMAN SUBJECTS
A. Ethical and policy issues in research involving human participants are grounded in Concordia University, St. Paul’s mission in the enlightened care of God’s creation and the safeguarding of human participants in all research under which the University is a part. The University will comply with all federal regulations requiring the establishment and operation of an Institutional Review Board for the protection of human participants. B. All research that can be defined as “a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge” (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services – 45 CFR 46) must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Participants (IRB). C. IRB review is also required of research carried out under the sponsorship of an institution other than Concordia University, St. Paul, but which is performed on the premises of Concordia University, St. Paul, even if the research has already been approved by the IRB at the sponsoring institution or elsewhere. D. Students and Faculty who are planning to conduct research are directed to use and follow FHB Section 8, Appendix D: Concordia University Saint Paul, MN Protocols and Procedures for Research Involving Human Subjects Application and Information Packet and Appendix E: Protocol Form Research Involving Human Subjects. E. Faculty and student researchers must successfully complete Human Subjects training through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program prior to submitting protocol forms for IRB review. All researchers must maintain valid (non-expired) certification of CITI training. The CITI certification is good for three (3) years from date of successful completion.

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9.63 RELEASE OF GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION
A. Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Concordia University defines the following information as directory information: the student’s name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and teams, dates of attendance, degree and awards received, and the most recent educational institution attended by the student. This information may be released unless the student notifies the Registrar of a specific hold. B. Concordia intends to comply fully with this act in order to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through formal and informal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Office concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the act.

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9.64 TEXTBOOK SELECTION- GRADUATE COURSES
Graduate course texts will be approved by the program chair

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9.65 FACULTY COMMUNICATION WITH GRADUATE STUDENTS
Graduate faculty will be available for student contact by personal appointment, phone consultation, or e-mail interaction. All student requests for a response shall be honored in a timely manner.

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9.66 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
A. Definition of Terms 1. Academic integrity is essential to any academic institution and is in keeping with the mission of Concordia University. In order to protect the rights of students, the disciplinary procedure for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty follows these broad guidelines. Violations of academic integrity include “cheating” and “plagiarism” as defined by the university’s Student Code of Conduct (SCC). 2. The term “cheating” includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; (2) dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; (3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the University faculty or staff; or (4) academic deception (e.g. fabricating data, misrepresenting sources, misleading presentations, lying) in written or oral form. 3. The term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials. 4. The term “recycling” may be new to some. Instructors expect that work submitted in a course is original work done for that course. These are two examples of recycling:  Submitting your own work, which has been submitted and graded for an earlier course, for a second course.  Submitting your own published work as original work for a course. B. Implementation of Academic Integrity Policies Process of Implementation Comment and instruction Faculty Member becomes aware of a violation of Academic Integrity and submits a Maxient Report 1. The instructor will gather and document all evidence of academic dishonesty in a clear and concise manner. The instructor will complete a Maxient Report following an initial discussion with the student. The report should assist in clarifying root issues. 2. The instructor will present this evidence to the student. The instructor will notify the student in writing that this has been done and will indicate the Dean of the College will provide information for the appeal process. 3. The instructor may prescribe academic penalties, including but not restricted to, the requirement of additional work, an assignment of a failing grade on the work in question, or a failing grade for the entire course. Any prescribed penalties must be in writing and include instructions for the appeal process. These should be documented through the Maxient Report. 4. If this is a repeated occurrence, the Department Chair may impose additional penalties, including but not limited to dismissal from the departmental program, suspension from the university, or expulsion from the university. 5. A student has the right to appeal the academic penalties imposed by the instructor by filing an appeal with the Collegiate Dean within 3 university business days of the documented imposition of penalties. A response regarding the appeal is normally received within 15 university business days. Steps for Appeal Regarding Academic Dishonesty can be found in the Faculty Handbook, 9.47. Report received by VPAA. Report copied to AVP-Graduate Studies Report is forwarded to Department Chair. AVP-Graduate Studies works with Department Chair to address issue. College Dean receives report and oversees the action taken. College Dean closes the case. Case is reviewed by the Academic Appeals Committee, chaired by AVP-Graduate Studies Further Appeal: Case is reviewed by the VPAA. No further appeals.

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9.70 ADDITIONAL GRADUATE FEES
1. Students enrolled in an Educational Specialist or Educational Doctorate degree programs must satisfactorily complete a written comprehensive examination for which there will be no fee. 2. Students enrolled in the Educational Doctorate degree program must pay an additional fee to cover the costs of the dissertation committee members and editing of the dissertation. The fee will be made known to the student at the time of acceptance into the program

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