|

Academic Degrees: Majors, Minors, Certificates, Courses

6.11 PRINCIPLES OF ACADEMIC CURRICULAR POLICY
A. The development of the curriculum is the responsibility of The Faculty. B. Faculty-approved curricular programs are described in the Academic Catalog of Concordia University, St. Paul. C. The Faculty, through its colleges, is responsible for establishing standards of student performance and evaluation procedures to insure achievement of standards for graduation requirements. New undergraduate programs are approved by the Undergraduate Policies Committee. Departments planning to offer a new undergraduate major, minor, or certificate are to follow guidelines suggested in 6.22. D. Normally, students who matriculate before a curricular revision is adopted may follow either the revised curriculum or the curriculum under which they matriculated. E. Instructors are to follow guidelines suggested in 6.21 for the preparation of course prospecti and course syllabi. The dean of the college and the chair of the department are each to receive a copy of the prospectus and the syllabus. It is the responsibility of the dean of the college to keep all college course prospecti and course syllabi current.

View Policy
6.12 DEGREE DEFINITIONS
A. Credit: A semester credit is typically 35 hours of engaged time. B. BA Major: Normally 32 to 44 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study. C. BA Independently Designed Major: Normally 32 to 44 credits constituted by courses from a range of academic disciplines. D. BA General Studies Major: Constituted as the successful completion of 36 approved credits of which no more than three courses may be applied to the General Education requirement. E. BA Sans Major: Constituted as the successful completion of two minors in lieu of a traditional major. Only one of the minors may be independently designed. F. BS Major: Normally 45 to 60 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study. G. BS Independently Designed Major: Normally 45 to 60 credits constituted by courses from a range of academic disciplines. H. BBA degree: 52 credits in the business core and 20 to 24 credits in a specific business concentration. I. BFA Major: a professional degree in the fine arts, consisting of up to but not exceeding 80 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study as recognized by relevant accrediting agencies. J. Emphasis: An intentional subset of a major consisting of 12 to 19 credits. K. Minor: 20 to 24 credits taken in one area or in related areas of study. L. Independently Designed Minor: 20 to 24 credits constituted by courses from a range of academic disciplines. M. Endorsement: An approved course of study that is added to an education major. N. General education: A part of the curriculum outside one’s major and/or minors that ensures an undergraduate education encompassing a broad range of topics, skills and values reflecting Concordia’s mission and purpose. O. Certificate: A set of courses of at least 12 credits that does not typically fulfill graduation requirements for a major, minor, or emphasis. P. Church certification: A course of study that leads to certification for commissioned ministries in The Lutheran Church– Missouri Synod. Q. Licensure Program: A course of study that leads to professional licensure. R. Prospectus: An abbreviated syllabus, a brief proposal for a newly developed course. S. Syllabus: A cognitive map or blueprint for a course. Among other things, it includes the learning goals for the course, the means by which the goals are to be achieved, and the assessment procedures for measuring student achievement. T. Term: Number of weeks as defined by federal financial aid regulations (15 weeks as of 2017).

View Policy
6.21 Form 1 NEW COURSE PROSPECTUS FORM
1. Full course title: 2. Subject code: ______ (e.g. MAT) Course level: ______ (e.g. 100 or 200) Proposed #: _____ (Consult the registrar’s office for available numbers in your subject code) 3. Semester credits: ________ 4. Prerequisite/Enrollment requirements: 5. Catalog description: 6. This course will be utilized as: A required course in the following programs: An elective course in the following programs: A general education course in the following area: (Subject to approval of the General Committee) 7. Rationale for course introduction at this time: 8. Resource requirements (staffing, equipment, facilities): 9. Student Learning Outcomes (objectives): 10. Principle learning activities (assessments): Type of instruction (Check all that apply) Traditional Online Hybrid Lab Terms Offered Fall Spring Summer Special Considerations Special course fee required $_____ Repeatable for ___ maximum credits, ___ times Replaces existing course number _______. This course will be dropped. Other: Signatures Submitted by: _____________________________________________________ (Proposer- please print) Date Approved by: _____________________________________________________ (Department Chair’s Signature) Date Approved by: _____________________________________________________ (Dean’s Signature) Date Copied to Vice President for Academic Affairs

View Policy
6.21 INTRODUCTION OF A NEW COURSE
1. An instructor may, in consultation with the department, develop a new course. 2. The prospectus form (6.21 Form 1) must be completed and approved by the department. Upon approval, the department chair shall send the prospectus form to the dean of the college. The dean of the college shall determine whether the course and the prospectus are in harmony with faculty policy and institutional objectives and is authorized to delay the offering of the course if the prospectus is unacceptable. As necessary, the dean of the college shall consult with department chairs and the Undergraduate Policies Committee in order to resolve problems that may arise. In cases where institutional policy conflicts with the plans of a department, the Undergraduate Policies Committee may examine the problem and recommend policy changes. 3. Once the prospectus is approved, a syllabus must be generated by the instructor and approved by the department chair. 4. If the proposed course is suggested to fulfill a general education requirement, it must receive approval from the General Education Committee. 5. Course descriptions will be published in the catalog for those courses that are offered regularly and for which a syllabus has been approved.

View Policy
6.22 Form 1 Proposal for a New Undergraduate Major, Minor, Emphasis, or Certificate
Step One: Please meet with the Vice President for Academic Affairs or his/her designee before beginning this process in order to determine which sections of this proposal form you need to complete and which departments or individuals are required for approval, review, or notification. An appropriate Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code will be determined at this time. Date of preliminary proposal meeting with VPAA: Sections of the form that are required: Step Two: Complete sections of the form indicated by VPAA. Step Three: Distribute for approvals, reviews, and notifications as indicated. A. Characteristics of the Proposed Program Full name of the proposed program, the specific degree (if applicable) or the instructional level (e.g., bachelor’s-level certificate): Six-digit CIP code of the program. (See above.) The total credit hours required for completion of the program (apart from general education and electives): Normal or typical length of time for students to complete the program: The proposed initial date for implementation of the program: The primary target audience for the program (e.g., full-time, part-time, traditional college age, working adults, transfer students, military personnel, etc.): 1. Describe the key dynamics — institutional mission and internal or external forces — that stimulated and shaped this proposal. 2. Discuss how this program would help realize Concordia’s Mission and Promise Statement. B. Identify External Accreditation, Advisory Groups, and/or Key Partnerships Supporting the Program If you are planning any involvement by external organizations (other than accredited higher education institutions) in key operations as identified below, provide the information requested for each planned involvement. Type of involvement Name(s) of external organization(s) Estimated % of Involvement A. Recruitment and admission of students (e.g., The Learning House) B. Course placement and advising of students C. Design and oversight of curriculum D. Direct instruction and oversight E. Other support for delivery of instruction C. Institutional Planning for Proposed Program 3. Briefly describe the planning process for determining the need for this new program, including the role of faculty in the process. 4. What are the physical facilities and equipment needed to support the program? Indicate the impact that the proposed change will have on the physical resources and laboratories that currently accommodate existing programs and services, or identify new laboratory and resource needs. 5. What is the evidence that a market for the new program exists? How has estimated program demand been factored into realistic enrollment projections? How has this evidence been used in planning and budgeting processes to develop a quality program that can be sustained? 6. If the program request is approved, what future growth do you anticipate (e.g., in the next six months, three years) and how do you plan to manage this growth (e.g., workload adjustments, additional instructors, etc.)? 7. Obtain a program cost model from the Chief Operating Officer and include below. How does this program fit into the current and expected financial picture of the institution? In particular, will the program be financially self-sufficient within three years? If not, when do you expect the program to be financially self-sufficient and how do you expect the program to operate until then? (Please work with your dean on this item.) Example: Program Cost Model Academic Year 13/14 14/15 15/16 16/17 17/18 Number of Students 15 30 40 40 40 Credits Generated – 8 per semester: Fall 120 240 320 320 320 Spring 120 240 320 320 320 Summer 120 240 320 320 320 Cost per credit $460 $470 $480 $490 $500 Total Revenue $165,600 $338,400 $460,800 $470,400 $480,000 Salaries $50,000 $80,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 Other expenses $50,000 $70,000 $90,000 $110,000 $130,000 Total Expenses $100,000 $140,000 $275,000 $350,000 $400,000 Profit/(Loss) $65,600 $198,400 $185,800 $120400 $80,000 8. What controls are in place to ensure that the information presented to students in advertising, brochures, and other communications will be accurate? D. Curriculum and Instructional Design 9. List the program learning outcomes. 10. List all the courses that comprise the program. Include course descriptions and number of credit hours for each. 11. What are the requirements students must fulfill to complete the program successfully (including specific courses, course options, and any other requirements)? Total number of credits for the program? 12. For programs using prior learning credit, compressed time frames, online delivery, accelerated formats, or other innovative approaches to learning, explain how the institution will ensure that student work and the levels of knowledge and competencies comparable to those required in traditional formats have been achieved? E. Institutional Staffing, Faculty, and Student Support 13. How many and what types (full-time, part-time, adjunct) of faculty will be employed in the program? Why is the number of fulltime faculty members adequate to support the program? 14. What will the impact of the new initiative have on current faculty workload? 15. What library and information resources—general as well as specific to the program(s)—and staffing and services are in place to support the initiative? 16. In a separate document, provide a brief listing that inventories each faculty member employed to teach in the program, including names of existing personnel, a description of each faculty member’s academic qualifications, their prior instructional responsibility and other experiences relevant to the courses they will teach in the program in question, each faculty member’s course load in the new program, and the course work each teaches in other programs currently offered. Document scholarship and research capability of each faculty member. F. Evaluation 17. Describe the process for monitoring, evaluating, and improving the overall effectiveness and quality of the program, including student persistence and completion. (Consult Associate Vice President for Assessment and Accreditation) 18. Attach the Assessment Plan (6.22 Form 2) approved by the Assessment Council. G. Approvals, Reviews, and/or Notifications Specific approvals, reviews, and notifications needed should be determined by the VPAA at the outset of the proposal process. Approvals, Reviews, and/or Notifications Approvals, Reviews, and/or Notifications Needed (√) Date OFFICIAL USE ONLY Supporting Documents Received Department — approval College approval Enrollment: Assoc. VP for Enrollment Management — review Accreditation: Assoc. VP for Assessment & Accreditation — review Assessment Council — approval of assessment plan (6.221) Vice President for Academic Affairs — approval Senior Vice President — approval Undergraduate Policies Committee — approval Faculty Senate — report Registrar — notification Submitted Concordia University System Submitted to Minnesota Office of Higher Education Submitted to Higher Learning Commission Assessment Plan for the Proposed Major or Minor in: Date of Submission to Assessment Council: Department: College: Indicate graduate or undergraduate: Step One: Identify Your Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and the Assessment Activities Used to Measure Them. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) Assessment Activities/Artifacts List each SLO separately. Include at least 3 but not more than 8. These learning outcomes should distinguish students in this major/minor from students in other majors/minors. At the completion of the program, students will be able to: What will you use to determine how well students have actually met each of these outcomes? (E.g., final presentation/paper/project, tests, capstone project, or other activity that demonstrates the degree to which students have achieved the learning outcome.) Each SLO requires at least one activity to measure it. 1. 2. 3. Step Two: Determine What Tool/Methods Your Department Will Use to Compile and Analyze Individual Student Results Aggregation and Analysis of Assessment Results How will the results of these assessments of individual students be aggregated and analyzed so that they provide useful information to your department, e.g., strengths and weaknesses of curriculum, instruction, student preparation, etc.? (For example, use the eLumen database, use a compilation of faculty tally lists, create a qualitative summary of all the data, etc.) Step Three: Determine What Process Your Department Will Use to Share Data and Take Actions for Improvement Use of Assessment Results for Improvement Describe the process your department will use to share assessment results and their implications for the major and for student learning with all department faculty (e.g., annual assessment retreat/meeting; executive summary, etc.)? Who will coordinate this process? What will be the decision-making process for actions to be taken in response to needed improvements? Who will compile the annual university assessment report for this major? Name of Proposal Submitter: Date of Department Approval: Assessment Council Feedback: Date of Assessment Council Approval:

View Policy
6.22 INTRODUCTION OF AN UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR, MINOR, CERTIFICATE, OR ENDORSEMENT
1. Elements of a proposal a. Academics i. The proposal will provide a rationale for the program and articulate its consistency with the mission of the university. ii. The proposal will state program objectives and Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) outcomes. iii. The proposal will demonstrate conformity with definitions (Policy 6.12) adopted by The Faculty. iv. The proposal will state curricular requirements. v. The proposal will list all course titles and descriptions in the program. b. Resources i. The proposal will demonstrate an established need for the program, in particular addressing marketability. ii. The proposal will show financial viability. iii. The proposal will present an operational budget for the first three years of the program. iv. The proposal will demonstrate that sufficient resources are in place for the operation of the program in terms of facility and faculty. Normally there will be one full-time faculty member administering the major who holds a terminal degree appropriate to the major and more than one full-time and/or adjunct faculty members with at least a Master’s degree appropriate to the major teaching in the program. Exceptions to this policy must have the expressed approval of the Undergraduate Policies Committee (UPC). Accrediting agencies require a rationale why the number of full-time faculty is adequate to support the program. c. Assessment i. The proposal will identify Student Learning Outcomes and the assessment activities used to measure them. ii. The proposal will state what tool/methods will be used to compile and analyze individual student results. iii. The proposal will discuss what process the department will use to share data and take actions for improvement. 2. Criteria for evaluating a proposal a. Academic components of the proposal must be of a quality comparable to or exceeding similar programming at competitive institutions and must conform to criteria set by appropriate accrediting bodies. b. Resource components of the proposal must be appropriate to the field, comparable to competitive universities, and conform to strategic priorities and financial requirements set by the university. c. Assessment components of the proposal must be valid and comparable to or exceed practices generally employed at the university. 3. Approval a. Proposals require the recommendation of the department, the college, the vice-president for academic affairs (VPAA), senior vice-president, and the assessment council. Additional consultations and notifications may be necessary. b. Proposals are approved by the UPC. Approval of new majors requires a 2/3 majority vote. All others require a simple majority. c. Primary responsibility for evaluating academic components resides with the UPC and VPAA. Resource components require clearance from the senior vice president. Assessment components are the responsibility of the assessment council. d. The UPC may not approve a proposal until it has received documented recommendations from the department, the college, the VPAA, the senior vice president, and the assessment council. e. The chair of UPC will report approvals of all new programs to Faculty Senate. 4. Types of Proposals a. Class A: Typical new major/minor/endorsement/certificate involving new courses and/or requiring additional resources (faculty, library, physical plant). (Where appropriate, a new major will also include a comparable minor.) Must complete 6.22 Form 1 (Proposal Form) and Form 2 (Assessment Plan). b. Class B: A major/minor/endorsement/certificate that repackages currently offered content in a different or interdisciplinary way. No new classes or increased offerings of current classes are necessary to launch the major/minor. However, if the new program requires a new Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP), then it may require completing the Class A requirements. 1. The proposal will include: a. A rationale for the program and its connection with the mission of the university. b. Program Student Learning Outcomes c. List of requirements d. Course descriptions 2. Obtain Department(s) and college(s) approvals. 3. Complete Assessment Plan (6.22 Form 2) and submit to assessment council. 4. VPAA approval. The department chair(s) provides a summary of the curriculum to the VPAA and demonstrates there are no additional costs to the institution in so packaging current courses. 5. The VPAA reports to the UPC that the proposal conforms to the definition of a Class B proposal. 6. The UPC votes on the proposal and reports to the Faculty Senate. c. Class C: A new major/minor/endorsement/certificate involving a consortial arrangement with or including content from/delivered by another institution(s) of higher learning. 1. Early in the process of preparing such a proposal, representatives of the department and the administration prepare a concept document of two to three pages that a. Sketches the contours of the proposal in rough form b. Documents the accreditation of the partner institution [e.g., when last renewed, for what term, any point of note significant to the program] and addresses potential concerns if the institution is not accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or its equivalent. c. Addresses consistency with and maintenance of institutional identity (e.g., Lutheran identity).  [Discussion on this point may serve a basis for the “Mission” section of the fuller proposal.] 2. Representatives of the department and the administration present the concept proposal to the UPC. The UPC may authorize further work on the proposal or request senate action. 3. Following authorization of the concept proposal, Class C proposals follow the steps for Class A proposals.

View Policy
6.24a INDEPENDENTLY DESIGNED MAJORS AND MINORS
A. Timing: A proposal for an individually designed major must be submitted to the department housing the major prior to degree completion. A proposal for an individually designed minor must be submitted prior to degree completion. B. Approval: The major must be approved by the department providing a plurality of the credits and by the chairperson of each department providing 12 or more credits. The minor must be approved by the chairperson of the department providing a plurality of the credits. C. Housing: The major or minor will be “housed” in the department providing the plurality of the credits. D. Outcomes: The department housing the major or minor will be responsible for certifying the outcomes. E. Individually designed majors and minors will include the language “individually designed” in the nomenclature on the transcript.

View Policy
6.30 CHANGING CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS
A. Changing a Course 1. The individual instructor may make course revisions for upgrading and updating. 2. If the course objectives or purpose of the class are to be altered, the chair of the department is to approve the revisions. A revised syllabus that has been approved by the department chair shall be submitted to the dean of the college. 3. When the change involves a course that meets state of Minnesota teaching licensure standards, the department is asked to consult with the teacher education unit. B. Changing a General Education Requirement 1. The following require approval by the General Education Committee, with prior approvals by department chair. a. Substantive changes to a course description and/or course learning outcomes, b. Change to departmentally selected University Outcomes, or c. Addition or deletion of a course from the current general education course offerings. 2. The following require approval first by the General Education Committee and, second, by the Undergraduate Policies Committee, with report to The Faculty Senate: a. Changes to the structure (e.g., required content areas), b. Size (i.e., total numbers of credits), or c. Overall philosophy (e.g., required outcomes vs. required courses). C. Changing the requirements of a major, minor, emphasis, or certificate (MMEC) 1. The department that is proposing the change consults all other departments affected by the change. 2. The department with prime responsibility for the MMEC may propose the replacement of a course(s) or addition of course options within credit limits set by the Undergraduate Policies Committee. If the changes do not increase the total number of credit hours in the approved MMEC only department and dean of the college approvals are needed. 3. Proposals increasing the number of credits in the MMEC must be approved by the Undergraduate Policies Committee. 4. When the change involves a course that meets state of Minnesota teaching licensure standards, the department is asked to consult with the teacher education unit. 5. Once approvals are obtained, the department chair completes the Academic Change Form and submits it to the dean. Upon approval, the dean submits the form to the VPAA. With VPAA approval, the form is forwarded to the Registrar’s office, the appropriate faculty members, administrators, and publications

View Policy
6.40 REVIEW OF EXISTING ACADEMIC MAJORS, MINORS, SPECIALITIES, AND EMPHASES
All existing academic majors, minors, specialties, emphases, and other academic offerings of the university are subject to an annual review using criteria administered by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

View Policy
6.50 GENERAL EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION
A. Mission Statement General education at Concordia University, Saint Paul introduces students to academic content areas central to the classical liberal arts and to the university’s identity, as expressed in its mission statement, and to the most essential components of these areas; it develops and cultivates skills requisite to any intellectual or professional endeavor; and it does so in a manner attentive to the abstract or methodological dimensions of the subject at hand. B. Implementation This mission statement is satisfied when the objectives and learning activities of any course proposed for general education credit (in all colleges of the university) are sufficiently broad so as to cover the principle aspects of the appropriate general education discipline or content area(s), as these have been identified by the university faculty and enumerated in the catalog, and when the course fosters student development in at least one of the following ways: a. skill in analysis, synthesis, integration, research, or evaluation; b. skill in problem solving, or in the application of the foregoing abilities to solve problems; c. skill in creative expression or design; d. skill in ethical reasoning or decision-making (in part by applying such core concepts as Christian vocation, responsibility and rights, liberty and justice, etc.); or, e. appreciation for human interaction and expression in smaller and larger communities, with all of the complexity this entails.

View Policy
6.631 INSTITUTIONAL ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS
A. Articulation agreements are the protocols for academic relationships between units of academic governance for the purpose of benefiting students and prospective students at two institutions. B. The purpose of such agreements is to insure programs of academic quality, to encourage student achievement, and to facilitate the transfer of course credits and a smooth transition from one academic institution to another. C. Articulation agreements are initiated by the deans of the colleges in coordination with partner institution officials and liaisons. D. The approval of the college dean, department chair(s), and the office of the registrar are necessary for ratifying an articulation agreement. E. Articulation with another institution will be considered on the basis of 1. the educational quality of the institution with which the articulation is sought; 2. the comparability of the nature, content, and level of the program to that offered at Concordia; 3. congruence with the University’s mission, curricula, and standards for student achievement; 4. alignment of student learning outcomes. F. The registrar (in consultation with department chair(s)) will review course descriptions and catalogs to determine if programs at the other institution are compatible with academic aims and purposes of Concordia University. G. The primary responsibility for the evaluation of the general education curriculum will be with the registrar. 1. Departments will be consulted if appropriateness and compatibility of the credits is in question. 2. The definitions of general education provided by the Higher Learning Commission and by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education will be used when evaluating credits. H. Courses approved through articulation into a program do not guarantee articulation into another program of the University. (e.g. A statistics course could satisfy the math requirement for a science program but not necessarily satisfy the math requirement in another program.) I. Articulation agreements are reported to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and will be reviewed by the department chair(s) and institutional liaisons on a regular basis.

View Policy