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Faculty Handbook Scope and Purpose

2.00 Faculty Scope and Purpose
A. The Faculty Handbook contains the approved policies and procedures of Concordia University concerning the terms and conditions of faculty employment, student education and issues, teaching and pedagogy, faculty expectations and university values. Portions of this handbook are incorporated into the individual employment contract of each faculty member. Where the terms and provisions of an individual contract of a faculty member are inconsistent with the general policies contained herein, the provisions of the individual contract shall supersede. Otherwise, the provisions of this Handbook as it now stands or as amended are legally binding on all parties for the specific period covered by contract. B. Should there be any misapplication or misinterpretation or violation of the specific provisions of this handbook, the faculty member involved in such a situation may refer actions taken by a department chair, program coordinator, dean, or other officer of the university to the Faculty Policies Committee. C. This handbook serves as the ongoing contract for tenured professors. D. Because some of the policies and procedures in this Handbook respond directly to the Concordia University Employee Handbook, all faculty and instructional staff shall have immediate access to a current Employee Handbook. E. Where they are not in agreement the Faculty Handbook policies will take precedence over Personnel Handbook policies.

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2.99 PROCEDURE FOR REVISION OF THE FACULTY HANDBOOK
A. The responsibility for reviewing and amending Parts 1, 3, 4, and 8 are within the jurisdiction of the faculty but are delegated to the appropriate administrative office changes and subject to review by the faculty. B. The following procedure is adopted as an orderly process for the initiation and consideration of amendments to Part 2, 5, 6, and 7 Sections of the Faculty Handbook. 1. Proposed revisions to the above Parts can be made by the faculty member, faculty committees, the vice president for academic affairs, the president, Board of Regents, or the Board for Higher Education. Proposals are routed to the Faculty Handbook Committee through the vice president for academic affairs. The following procedure is used: a. Proposals are made in the form of texts intended to replace, in whole or in part, or to adapt some current expressions of the Handbook. b. A particular proposal should contain alterations for no more than one section (such as Section 2.72); c. The proposals should include a brief explanation of the reason(s) for proposing the revision accompanying the proposal; and d. Recognized governing bodies or committees must pass upon such proposed amendments by a simple majority vote. 2. Procedure a. The vice president for academic affairs may appoint an ad hoc Faculty Handbook Committee to consider Faculty Handbook amendments. This committee, upon receipt of a written proposal submitted to it by the vice president for academic affairs, may choose one of the following courses of action: i. It may receive and transmit it to the president and the plenary faculty without change or comment; ii. It may endorse it and attach its endorsement to the original proposal; iii. With the consent of the submitter, it may either alter or amend a proposal before transmitting it to the president and plenary faculty; iv. If the submitter does not agree to such alterations or amendments, the Faculty Handbook Committee may object to the proposal and attach its objections or amendment before sending it to the president and faculty assembly. b. The plenary faculty accepts or rejects the amendments, by a simple majority vote of that body. The plenary faculty may modify the proposal and accept the modification, or may return to the Faculty Handbook Committee for further work or modification. 3. Internal Processing a. Internal monitoring of the Faculty Handbook is done by the office of the vice president for academic affairs. This includes additions of synodical convention policy changes as reflected in new editions of the Synodical Handbook, clarification of wording, etc. These changes do not require faculty approval nor do changes in Sections 1, 3, or 4, require formal faculty approval. Announcements of changes in these sections are made in the CSP Bulletin. Concerns may be expressed to the appropriate Cabinet officer within a week after publication in the CSP Bulletin. b. All new members of the faculty shall receive a copy of the Faculty Handbook at the time of their initial appointment as a new faculty member. Such copy must contain PART 2 in the form that will apply during the contract term. Continuing members of the faculty will receive copies of revisions on an ongoing basis. Changes made in the Faculty Handbook will be appended to the Faculty/Staff Bulletin. C. Proposals under discussion by the Board of Regents have no status, not even a promissory one, until final action by the Board has been taken.

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Academic Appointments

2.893 FACULTY & STAFF ANNIVERSARIES
A. The Board of Regents resolved to observe the 25th, 40th, 50th, 60th 70th, 75th and 80th anniversaries of faculty and staff members, formal entrance into the preaching or teaching ministries of the church. B. Years of service to the college are also observed beginning with the 10th and every 5th year thereafter. C. This recognition is made annually by the Board of Regents.

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2.73 TENURE
The University shall follow the guidelines set forth in the Faculty Handbook governing the granting of tenure to individual tenure track faculty members. The University uses the term “Tenure” as the name for the continuing level of faculty appointments. Tenure is granted by the board of regents following the approval of the President, Provost, and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Concordia University, St. Paul shall typically have 35-50% percent of its full-time faculty serving at the continuing appointment level. A. The faculty member shall ordinarily have six years of creditable service (periods of leave are not included) as a member of the faculty of one or more educational institutions of the Synod, at least the last three years of which shall have been in the institution he/she is currently serving. B. The faculty member’s reputation, character, concern for students, and leadership shall present a good reflection on the institution and the church. C. The Faculty member will have demonstrated exemplary teaching, scholarship, and service as documented by the annual review and advancement in rank assessments. D. The Faculty member will normally have been advanced in rank at CSP at least once and hold rank at the level of Associate Professor or above. E. The Faculty member holds the terminal degree F. In addition to teaching, scholarship, and service as noted in C above, the institutional fit of the faculty member will be evaluated. Institutional fit includes support for university mission, program viability and the overall percentage of tenured faculty in the university and the faculty member’s department. I. Procedural Guidelines for the Granting ofTenure A. Individual Faculty Member PresentsRequest When the individual faculty member feels the qualifications for tenure have been met, he or she presents a written request for tenure consideration to the Department Chair of the academic unit. This request shall explain how the criteria for tenure have been met and accompanied by appropriate documentation. Documentation of the faculty member’s teaching, scholarship and service contribution to Concordia, St. Paul since their last academic promotion should follow the procedures outlined for Promotion and Advancement, as well as three letters of recommendation. Additionally, the faculty member will include an essay on institutional fit reflecting on support for the university mission and integration of faith and learning in his or her service. B. The Department Chair Recommends The Department Chair meets with the faculty member to discuss the request for tenure. The department chair prepares a written recommendation addressing to the faculty member’s teaching, scholarship, and service. Accompanying documentation includes classroom visitation forms and/or performance evaluations for areas of responsibility outside of classroom instruction. The recommendation of the department chair with accompanying documentation is added to the faculty member’s written request for tenure with its accompanying documentation and both are presented to the college dean. C. The Dean Recommends The college dean meets with the faculty member to discuss the request for tenure. The department dean prepares a written recommendation addressing to the faculty member’s teaching, scholarship, and service. Accompanying documentation includes classroom visitation forms and/or performance evaluations for areas of responsibility outside of classroom instruction. The recommendation of the dean with accompanying documentation is added to the faculty member’s written request for tenure with its accompanying documentation and both are presented to the vice-president for academic affairs and the provost. The dean of the college informs the faculty member of the recommendation to be made. In an exceptional case, the dean of the college appoints a committee of two tenured faculty members from the department or college involved to evaluate the question of tenure for the faculty member. A formal vote may be taken with the dean breaking the tie, should a tie vote occur. The result of the vote is conveyed to the vice president for academic affairs. The faculty member is informed by the vice president for academic affairs of the decision. D. Vice president for academic affairs Presents to thePresident The Vice President for Academic Affairs, Provost, Dean and a tenured faculty member will meet with the individual faculty member requesting tenure and discusses the faculty member’s request and the dean of the college’s recommendation. The panel makes an assessment of institutional fit. The vice president for academic affairs presents the request to the president of the university. 1. The President of the University Presents to the Board of Regents The president of the university reviews the request for tenure. The president presents the request to the Board of Regents with his recommendation. 2. The Board of Regents Acts On theRequest If the Board of Regents, on recommendation of the president of the university, determines that a faculty member meets the above requirements for tenure or has not been granted tenure, it shall either carry forward the procedure for granting tenure or inform the faculty member of its decision not to grant tenure, in which case the individual either may continue at the non-tenure level. 3. Notice of Intent is Published Notice of intent to grant tenure shall be announced in the official periodical of the Synod. 4. Member May Respond The faculty member shall be given the opportunity to respond to any comments or concerns that may have been raised relative to tenure. 5. Consent of the Electors isGiven At least six weeks after the notice is published, consent of the electors of the university shall be given. E. Board of Regents Grants Tenure After final review the Board of Regents may grant tenure. F. Tenure The granting of tenure does not confer advancement in rank or increase in salary. ii. The Appeals Process A recommendation to deny the request for tenure at any point in the process may be appealed by the faculty member. All such denied recommendations must be accompanied by thorough and specific explanations of the denial. The faculty member may appeal by requesting the vice president for academic affairs to appoint a special review committee consisting of three tenured members of the faculty. The faculty member may appear before the committee to present the request and respond to any comments or concerns that have been raised. The committee will review the requests and the recommendations. A formal vote on the tenure request may be taken. The results of the vote will be conveyed to the vice president for academic affairs and the provost. The faculty member is informed by the vice president for academic affairs of the decision of the committee. If the committee decides in favor of tenure, the recommendation is carried to the president. If the recommendation of the committee is to deny the request for tenure, the dean of the college, the vice president for academic affairs, and the individual faculty member will meet to discuss the recommendation. When feasible, a plan for professional development for the faculty member denied tenure is made and filed in the office of the dean of the college and the vice president for academic affairs. The faculty member may again request tenure after a period of one or more years. Post Tenure Review All faculty members, included tenured professors participate in an annual review of their service.

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2.64 CREDIT FOR ACADEMIC SERVICE AT OTHER INSTITUTIONS
A. Newly employed faculty members with previous teaching experience at a non-synodical educational institution will not ordinarily have that experience count as credit towards tenure, advancement in rank, or sabbatical leave. B. Newly employed faculty members with previous experience at another educational institution of synod will ordinarily have that experience count as credit towards tenure, advancement in rank, and sabbatical leave. Faculty members who have been tenured at another synodical institution may receive initial appointment with permanent tenure.

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2.17 FACULTY CONTRACT DEFINITIONS
A. Faculty Appointments 1. Authority to hire and retain full-time faculty members belongs to the Board of Regents. This authority is exercised through recommendation from the president. 2. The vice president of academic affairs is given written approval from the president to begin search for candidates for the vacant or new position. B. Continuous Contracts 1. Continuous contract rights at Concordia University are given to ranked faculty members who have attained tenure. C. Locus of Appointments 1. All faculty appointments have as the locus of the appointment the department of Concordia University which is stated in the contract. For a few faculty members, the locus of appointment may be in a primary department with a secondary appointment locus. Faculty members teaching interdisciplinary courses have their locus in their primary academic divisions. D. Issuance and Receipt of Renewable Contract 2.17:2 Contract Definitions 1. All contracts for ranked full-time faculty for any academic year must be offered on or before January 1 prior to the June 30 expiration date of that year and be returned within thirty days of issuance, or the first working day thereafter. Full time ranked faculty are entitled to an additional 30 day extension by written request to the president. If a contract offer is not accepted in writing before that time, or if a written special arrangement is not made with the president by that date, the offer automatically expires. 2. All other term contracts are issued on an individual basis as the necessity arises. E. Full time faculty members hold contracts with the institution for twelve months work per year. F. Each faculty member is entitled to a one month vacation period. G. Contracts for Professors of Practice 1. Professors of Practice contracts at Concordia University are limited to the term of employment outlined in the contractual agreement. Contracts for Professors of Practice are not tenure track and do not confer upon a faculty member any entitlement to continued employment after the term specified when the contract expires.

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2.16 SPECIAL APPOINTMENT INSTRUCTIONAL STAFF
Special appointment instructional staff are instructors who hold the status of Contracted Part-time Faculty of Practice, Professors of Practice, Visiting Professor/Lecturer, Professor Emeritus, or Full-time Staff with Teaching Load. They do not normally accrue time toward tenure, promotion, or sabbatical and are usually ineligible for institutional funds allocated for advanced study or faculty development grants while holding this status. Special appointment instructional staff under contract who have completed at least two years of teaching at Concordia with at least an 80% workload may apply for faculty development grants, but will be given lower priority than full time, tenure track ranked faculty. The Concordia Plans apply to those meeting eligibility requirements. (Section 2.83) Initial appointments are probationary. Special appointments of instructional staff are dependent on adequate enrollment in the proposed instructional load. Special appointment instructional staff hold non-voting membership on the faculty. A. Part-time Faculty of Practice B. A Contracted Part-time Faculty of Practice is usually a part-time temporary employee of Concordia University. Appointment is made by the dean of the college upon recommendation of the department chair. Adjunct instructors 1. usually have less than a half-time teaching load; 2. meet or exceed the credential criteria required of academic rank faculty members; 3. are screened by the department chairs and interviewed by the dean of the college; 4. are interviewed by the president, at his request, if a first time appointment; 5. are appointed on a term basis by the dean of the college; 6. receive a term contract (Section 2.17G1); 7. adhere to university standards of professional classroom practice, (Section 2.40); 8. are expected to be available for office hours at least one and one-half hours per week for each course taught to advise students regarding their course work; 9. conduct classes at a level appropriate to the level of the assigned course and decide course content and text selection in consultation with the department chair. C. Professor of Practice This type of appointment may be used for full-time, non-tenure track instructional staff. Although this is a nonranked appointment and does not include membership on the faculty, term faculty may receive two year contracts. Professor of Practice may be eligible for full-benefits; they may be represented by the Faculty Senate; they may serve on non-standing committees and carry advising responsibilities as appropriate. When a tenure track opening comes available, term faculty may apply. Criteria for appointment as Professor of Practice shall be 1. possession of a master’s degree from a graduate institution of recognized standing as a minimum; and 2. either proven or presumptive potential to obtain the appropriate terminal degree in their area of responsibility as determined by the college and/or department (Section 2.15A); and 3. either proven or presumptive potential for satisfactorily fulfilling the duties and responsibilities of a faculty member. D. Visiting Professor or Visiting Lecturer This title is assigned to individuals who hold or who have held academic rank at another institution of higher education or have accomplishments that are considered equivalent (e.g., outstanding performance in the creative arts or in the business and/or professional community). Visiting professors or lecturers are appointed to teach or to teach and pursue other duties at Concordia University for a limited period of time. All such appointments are on term contracts for full or part-time status. The process of appointment shall be by the president upon recommendation by the department chair to the dean of the college. E. Professor Emeritus This rank may be assigned by special resolution of the Board of Regents to ranked professors who have limited or terminated their responsibilities as a ranked faculty member due to retirement. A professor emeritus is so.designated and appointed by the Board of Regents upon recommendation by the president and the dean of the college. (Synodical Handbook 6.53.) F. Full-time Staff Teaching One or More Courses Full-time staff members, (not faculty members), with credentials and experience in a specific area may be invited by the VPAA in consultation with the department chair and the dean of the appropriate college to teach on a course by course basis. Contractual arrangements are made by the dean of the college in consultation with the department chair and the VPAA.

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2.152 FAITH CONSIDERATIONS IN FACULTY SEARCHES
A. In order to be considered candidates must be willing and able to share and support Concordia University’s LCMS Lutheran theology and identity. B. Candidates’ academic and professional preparation in fulfilling the specifically identified academic and teaching needs sought by the department/college and its search committee, along with institutional fit with CSP, shall be the highest consideration of the search committee in the search for full time faculty members. C. Candidates’ academic and professional preparation being equal, preference in search processes shall be given to practicing LCMS candidates, with secondary preference being given to practicing Lutheran and Christian candidates able to share and support LCMS theology and identity. D. Search committees may be expected to justify recommending non-LCMS candidates if practicing LCMS candidates have applied for the position. E. This policy applies to searches for all full time faculty appointments. F. Search committees in Religion or Theology may only consider LCMS candidates. Tenure-track or tenured candidates in Religion and Theology must receive prior approval from the Concordia University system board.

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2.151 FACULTY QUALIFICATION - TERMINAL DEGREES
A. As a general rule the terminal degree qualifying an individual for tenure or advancement should be appropriate for the person’s teaching responsibilities. B. Professional degrees (e.g. M.B.A., M.S.W., M.D., D.Min., D.D., M.A.R.) are not acceptable as terminal unless the person involved teaches only professional courses. C. The usually accepted terminal degrees include the following: Ph.D., Th.D., D. Miss., D.M.A. (in music only), Ed.D., M.F.A. (in art or theatre only). The D.A.T. is recognized as an alternative. D. The M.L.S. (a professional degree) is accepted for faculty status only in combination with another academic master’s degree. E. The M.B.A. in combination with another appropriate credential is accepted as terminal in business administration. Thus the faculty person should also possess the C.P.A. (accounting), or the J.D. degree (business law). If a second such credential is lacking, the Ph. D. or the D.B.A. is required.

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2.15 CRITERIA FOR INITIAL APPOINTMENT TO SPECIFIC RANKED FACULTY STATUS
At the time of initial appointment of a full-time faculty member, the Vice President of Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Dean of the College and the department chair, makes a judgment about rank for the initial contract normally using the criteria described below as approved by the Board of Regents. Exceptional evidence of high merit or achievement may also be used to make judgments regarding assignment of initial rank. Written copies of the decision will be provided to the college and/or department. Thereafter, rank changes are subject to the Faculty Handbook. (Section 2.72) All initial appointments are for a maximum of two years. A. Instructor Criteria for rank of instructor shall be 1. possession of a master’s degree from a graduate institution of recognized standing as a minimum; and 2. either proven or presumptive potential to obtain the appropriate terminal degree in their area of responsibility as determined by the college and or department (See Appendix A); and 3. either proven or presumptive potential for satisfactorily fulfilling the duties and responsibilities of a faculty member. B. Assistant Professor Criteria for the rank of assistant professor normally shall be 1. demonstrated competence in teaching; and 2. possession of an appropriate terminal degree in their area of responsibility as recognized by the college and/or department, or academic degree from a graduate institution of recognized standing, or equivalent experience and professional recognition (e.g. recognized performance in the creative arts, in the business community or extensive teaching experience); and 3. either proven or presumptive potential for satisfactorily fulfilling the duties and responsibilities of a faculty member; and 4. proven or presumptive scholarship in his or her subject matter field. C. Associate Professor Criteria for the rank of associate professor shall be 1. evidence of sustained, noteworthy teaching effectiveness; and 2. possession of an appropriate terminal degree in their area of responsibility as recognized by the college and/or department or academic degree from a graduate institution of recognized standing or equivalent experience and professional recognition (e.g. recognized performance in the creative arts, in the business community, or extensive teaching experience); and 3. a minimum of six years of full-time ranked teaching in a regionally accredited college or university (or its equivalent) or a minimum of four years of full-time teaching at the rank of assistant professor; and 4. evidence of noteworthy research, scholarship, creative or professional activities, and/or community service. D. Professor Criteria for the rank of professor shall be 1. extraordinary teaching, scholarship, and service at Concordia University. 2. possession of an appropriate terminal degree in their area of responsibility as recognized by the college and/or department or academic degree from a graduate institution of recognized standing or equivalent experience and professional recognition (e.g. recognized performance in the creative arts, in the business community, or extensive teaching experience). 3. The professor must have a minimum of twelve years of full-time ranked teaching in a regionally accredited college or university (or its equivalent), or a minimum of four years of full-time teaching at the rank of associate professor.

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2.14 FACULTY SEARCHES
A. The Chair of the Search Committee in consultation with the dean of their college will draft and post the language of listings for full-time faculty member postings. B. Other sources such as the VPAA or HR may provide input on listings. C. No listing that undergoes revisions may be posted without consultation and approval of the chair of the search committee, or the department chair in absence of an appointed committee chair.

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2.10 FACULTY MEMBERSHIP AND RANK
A. Regular teaching faculty are those who have been called or contracted by the Board of Regents and who hold instructional rank. B. Faculty membership and rank at Concordia University, St. Paul will conform to the Synodical Handbook.

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2.94 FACULTY DELEGATES TO SYNODICAL CONVENTIONS
A. “Each of the Synod’s educational institutions shall be represented at synodical conventions by one of its board members in addition to the District President, by its president, and by one faculty member for every 30 faculty members who are members of the Synod. Fractional groupings shall be disregarded.” (1998 Synodical Handbook 3.13c) B. A faculty member becomes eligible to serve as a delegate from Concordia University, St. Paul, to the synodical convention when the faculty member attains permanent status on the faculty (approval by the Board for Higher Education) or after five years of service to the university. Should there be a tie, total years of service to Concordia University, St. Paul, shall be a deciding factor. Should a tie remain, selection shall be by alphabetical listing. C. A delegate designate may not waive the right to attend a convention in preference for a succeeding convention. Seniority on the list will be maintained only if the candidate is prevented from attending because of personal illness, family emergency, or obligations which the university has placed upon the delegate as approved by the president. D. Retirement removes a person from the list. E. Delegates who have attended a convention will be placed at the end of the list immediately after the convention attended. F. Financial arrangements for attending synodical conventions are under the supervision of the president’s office. G. The list of delegates is maintained in the office of the vice president for academic affairs.

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2.952 RETIREMENT RECOGNITION FOR FULLTIME FACULTY MEMBERS
A. Faculty, upon retirement, will typically be recognized individually in a formal and public ceremony on campus at Concordia. B. Formal plans for retirement recognition for a faculty member begin after the faculty member has placed his/her resignation in writing to the vice president for academic affairs and/or president. Ideally, the formal planning process begins four to six months before the recognition service. C. Procedural guidelines will be maintained within the office of the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

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2.95 EMERTI FACULTY
A. This designation may be assigned by special resolution of the Board of Regents to ranked professors who have limited or terminated their responsibilities as a ranked faculty member due to retirement. A professor emeritus is so designated and appointed by the Board of Regents upon recommendation by the president and the dean of the college through the vice president for academic affairs. (Synodical Handbook 6.27d.) B. The faculty has resolved to remember emeriti professors and families in their prayers. The vice president for academic affairs invites emeriti professors to participate in academic processions. The administration, faculty and committees are encouraged to involve emeriti professors, their spouses, and emeriti widows/ers in the academic and social events of the university whenever appropriate and possible. C. Emeriti, their spouses, and emeriti widows/ers are encouraged to serve and participate in Concordia’s educational process when invited and appropriate. D. Concordia is committed to promoting close ties between itself and its emeriti faculty. The following benefits are available to emeriti, their spouses, and emeriti widows/ers: 1. An identification card (ID) to be used for library, parking and fitness privileges. 2. Admission to cultural, athletic and theatre/concert events at faculty rates. Single emeriti may bring a guest at the same rates. 3. Technology services (web-based e-mail and dial-up internet access) at the level provided to fulltime faculty members, except for the issue of a computer or resolving problems with personal hardware. 4. Free tuition courses and workshops at Concordia as space is available. 5. Meeting facilities for emeriti groups as space is available and requested through the facilities manager.

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Faculty Expections

2.931 FACULTY PARTICIPATION IN ACADEMIC FUNCTIONS
A. Members of the faculty are expected to appear in cap and gown to form a procession at academic functions. B. Other persons as defined under membership (Faculty Policy 2.10A) may participate in any semester in which their status as members applies. C. Notification of non-participation in events in which the faculty processes (opening service, honors convocation, baccalaureate, and commencements) are to be submitted to the vice president for academic affairs two weeks prior to the event. D. Order of march for academic events is determined in this order: rank, beginning of service to Concordia University, and alphabetically.

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2.92 A STATEMENT OF POLICY ON FACULTY SERVICE LOADS – CONCORDIA GUIDELINES
A. The faculty of Concordia University underscores the importance of intensive study or research; for the achievement of quality teaching and the need for a flexible administration of policy in order to establish the climate in which quality teaching and learning can take place. B. The following principles pertaining to the faculty service load are proposed 1. The faculty of Concordia University must take the initiative in establishing and maintaining standards of scholarship and professionalism that are appropriate to this institution. Such standards will convey to students and to the constituents of the university the image of a faculty that is i. dedicated to Christ and His Word. ii. zealous for personalized instruction and excellent teaching. iii. involved in regular study and research. iv. committed to serve students, as well as others in the church and community. v. willing to serve the best interest of the university. C. Faculty members are to emphasize teaching, but quality teaching requires some research and/or creative work, continual study and attendance at conferences of the professional. The University should facilitate quality teaching by encouraging such activities, with the expectation that the continued professional growth of the faculty will stimulate learning on this campus and create a climate of intellectual ferment.

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2.90 FACULTY WORKLOADS
The standard expected annual workload for faculty members is 28 semester credit hours of which 24 shall normally be teaching hours. The Dean of the appropriate college in consultation with the Vice President for Academic Affairs and the appropriate department chair determines the individual faculty member’s workload. Procedure The workload is determined according to the following guidelines: 1. An annual workload over 28 credits is considered an overload and is normally eligible for overload pay unless one or more of the following conditions apply: ● The previous 2 year average annual workload was less than 27 ● The average class size for the instructor is less than 10* ● The faculty member requests or it is anticipated that the workload for the next year will be less than 27 credit hours *excluding independent studies, internships, supervisions and the like 2. Overload may be calculated and paid when an annual workload is under 28 when one or more of the following conditions apply: ● Average class for the faculty member is greater than 30 ● The faculty member’s workload is greater than 27 and is asked by the college dean to teach an extra course ● Previous (2 years) annual workloads have been between 27 and 28 3. When an annual workload has been less than 27 for two consecutive years, the faculty member may be required to teach another course with reduced overload pay. 4. Summer workload may be included in the annual workload at the request of the faculty member. The summer workload must take place prior to the upcoming academic year, so faculty should plan ahead. 5. No overload pay will be distributed prior to census date of Spring Semester. 6. The annual workload will be calculated after census date of Spring Semester. Overload pay will be determined at that time. 7. Workload credits will be calculated as follows: ● Normally courses will count as one workload credit for each academic credit. ● Team-taught courses will normally have the course credit hours divided among the number of faculty involved unless approved by the dean of the college. ● Lab, Music, and Studio course load weight will be determined as agreed upon by the department and the college deans. ● Internship supervision shall be calculated as .1 per student credit hour generated to a maximum of .7 credits. ● Student teaching supervision shall be calculated .7 per full time and .35 per half time student teacher. ● Independent studies shall be calculated as .1 per student per credit when approved for load weight. ● Advising load weight shall be prorated at 1 credit per semester for each 20 advisees or part thereof officially assigned to the faculty member by the director of advising. Dual advising will be assigned to the primary advisor. ● The typical load weight for departmental chair duties will be 4 credit hours per year unless justified in the Chair’s job description and approved by the Dean of the college. 8. Other administrative load weight will be determined and approved by the dean of the college in consultation with the vice president for academic affairs. A Job Description and/or rationale will be needed. 9. The process for determining overload calculation and workload calculation is through the dean of the college. Exceptions to the above need approval of the deans affected and may require inter-college coordination.

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2.51 FACULTY MEETINGS-UNIVERSITY POLICIES:
University policies regarding faculty and faculty senate meetings are in the Concordia University, St. Paul, Faculty Constitution and Bylaws. A. Concordia University’s policies regarding faculty meetings are found in the Preamble of the Faculty Handbook. B. The Faculty Policies Committee serves as a hearings committee.

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2.41 FACULTY ETHICAL VALUES STATEMENT
Faculty are invited to conduct their relationships with other faculty, staff, alumni, students and administration in a manner that reflects the values of the University. These values include: • Integrity: We recognize that faculty serve as role models for students and other colleagues and thereby need to exemplify and witness the faith and values of our University. • Faithfulness – We recognize the power of our words and actions to those with whom we speak. We speak positively about the university and its Christian mission to all of our constituencies. Within the University’s structure, we engage in responsible discourse and activities that promote growth supporting the University’s mission. • Patience: We recognize that success comes from persistent efforts and the belief that relationships and people can be forgiven and restored. We teach and relate in a manner that reflects the belief that all individuals are learning and growing daily. • Respect: We recognize the importance of treating others with dignity. We teach in a manner that is consistent and fair. • Accountability: We recognize that we are responsible for our own actions and the consequences of those actions. We teach with the understanding that students need to be held accountable for their choices. • Empathy: We recognize the importance of having realistic expectations of students and colleagues and recognize the uniqueness of each individual. We understand that each of us has our own strength and weaknesses. We also expect and assume the best from our colleagues. • Cooperation – We recognize that we are in partnership, not rivalry, with our colleagues. We celebrate and rejoice in the success of others while accepting feedback gracefully. This list is not exhaustive. It suggests the collegial behavior we wish to model as Concordia University faculty. These values grow from the mission of Concordia University, St. Paul, from its understanding that the Christian Gospel proclaims a freedom in Christ for responsible service to each other.

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2.40 FACULTY PERSONAL CONDUCT
The professional conduct and expectations of Concordia University’s instructional staff shall uphold the mission statement of the university. This shall be expected in relationships to the profession, to the students, to colleagues, and to the institution. A. Relationships to the profession 1. Develop and improve competence in teaching and scholarly mastery of one’s discipline. 2. Engage in one’s professional organizations; growing in knowledge of the discipline and/or enhance one’s teaching skills. 3. Demonstrate the interrelationships of one’s own discipline to other disciplines, thereby promoting a true liberal arts education for one’s students. 4. Practice intellectual honesty in respect to one’s discipline and recognizing the values of the disciplines taught by others. 5. Review, revise, and update one’s teaching materials and methods on a regular basis. B. Relationships to students 1. Meet assigned classes promptly and regularly. 2. Provide timely and just appraisal of students’ work and recognizes the right of students to review their work and grades. 3. Is available to students for course work assistance and other types of advising as requested by the student. 4. Protects the students’ right of academic freedom. 5. Treats in confidence the student’s, weaknesses, needs, and failures, and reveals them only in a professional manner when necessary for the welfare of the student or the institution. 2.40:2 Personal Conduct C. Relationships to Colleagues 1. Provides support, encouragement and constructive criticism of colleagues and the institution in a professional, and if necessary, confidential manner. Also promotes mutual trust and consideration among faculty, and defends colleagues under unjust attack. 2. Supports each faculty member’s right to academic freedom and demonstrates respect for each faculty member’s opinions and discipline. 3. Secures permission and gives credit for using the findings of colleagues. D. Relationships to the institution 1. Assists the administration as time and ability permit. 2. May serve on committees/boards outside the university, but may not speak in an official capacity on behalf of the university. This authority is the responsibility of the President’s Cabinet and/or the President and/or the Board of Regents. 3. Recognizes the primary responsibility of fulfilling institutional assignments and carefully controls the amount and character of work outside the university.

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2.31 FACULTY ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES
A. To meet its educational goals, Concordia University is committed to cooperation among the Board of Regents, the administration, the staff, the faculty, and students. The broadest possible exchange of information and opinion is necessary for effective planning and implementation of the university’s educational objectives. B. Each constituency of the academic community has different initiating and decision-making responsibilities. The responsibility for initiating and formulating recommendations for the appropriate decision-making body is ordinarily exercised through the various committees of the university. C. The faculty carries forward its obligations with respect to academic affairs chiefly in the faculty senate meeting and through its representatives on appropriate standing committees of the university. Additional faculty responsibilities are fulfilled by participation on committees of the Board of Regents, the administration and department governance, and/or ad hoc committees. D. In general, initiation of educational policy shall rest with the faculty. E. No exercise of powers herein conferred on the faculty, which in the judgment of the president of the college involves a major issue in the educational policy of the university, shall take effect without the concurrence of the president of the university and the approval of the Board of Regents. The power of review or final decision in these areas is lodged in the Board of Regents or delegated by it to the president. Only in exceptional circumstances, however, is non-concurrence exercised, and the reasons for the action are communicated to the faculty. F. Specifically the faculty 1. is concerned with the enrichment of spiritual life among students, faculty and academic staff. 2. develops, constructs, delivers, and evaluates the curricula of the university. 3. sets standards for extra-class and co-curricular life and activities of the students. 4. reviews policies and regulations that contribute to the maintenance of wholesome conditions of instructional staff service and welfare. 5. requests reports from the various administrative officers.

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Faculty Professional Development and Evaluation

2.882 QUASI ENDOWMENT GRANT FACULTY DEVELOPMENT AWARD PROGRAM
A. Policy: The University maintains a quasi-endowed fund to promote scholarly activity. The program is administered by the Faculty Development Policies Committee serving in an advisory role to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. B. Procedures 1. Applications for funds are accepted two times a year. The guidelines, deadlines, and application format are posted on the Faculty Scholarship Center website at least two months in advance of the application deadline. 2. The Faculty Development Committee makes recommendations for awards to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. Normally, notification of awards will be given to applicants no later than one month after the deadline.

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2.74 SABBATICAL LEAVES
A. Each institution shall state policies regarding sabbaticals for faculty and leave of absence procedures for all employees within Board for Higher Education guidelines. (2001 Synodical Handbook 6.57) B. The purpose of a sabbatical leave is to provide a time of scholarly renewal for the faculty member. It is assumed that this renewal comes when the faculty member has sufficient time to devote to study and exploration in his or her field. Therefore, the primary criterion for approval of sabbatical leave is evidence of scholarly activity. This may include professional growth activities such as significant research, creative work, advanced studies, and special discipline-related service to the district, synod, or other external education or government agencies. The sabbatical project should lead to a deeper and broader understanding of one’s discipline and/or to an understanding of a new discipline. Recipients of sabbatical leaves should be prepared to provide some tangible evidence of scholarly achievement. This may include (but is not limited to) such things as published articles, professional presentations, and creative works. The sabbatical leave application should clearly identify the scholarship goals. C. Procedures: 1. Full time ranked faculty receive consideration for a sabbatical based upon their index number. Those with the highest index number will ordinarily receive priority consideration for a half-year sabbatical. The index number is determined by years of service at synodical institutions of higher education minus the number of previous sabbaticals (at Concordia University, St. Paul or other synodical institutions of higher education) multiplied by nine. Example: Professor X has served synodical institutions of higher education as a full-time ranked faculty member for 23 years, with two sabbaticals. Professor X’s index number would be determined as follows: 23 years of full-time service -18 (2 previous sabbaticals, 2 x 9 = 18) 5 (index number) 2. A Leave of Absence has no effect on the individual’s index number. 3. Individuals with an index number of seven or higher and who have not had a sabbatical in the last five full years may apply for a full year sabbatical at any time. Full year sabbaticals are granted in addition to the previously determined number of half-year sabbaticals. 4. Faculty coming to the University from other synodical institutions of higher education must serve a minimum of 2 years at Concordia University, St. Paul prior to receiving a sabbatical, index number not withstanding. Faculty members who have served at non-synodical institutions of higher learning will be given one index number for every two years served at those institutions, not to exceed an index number of four. 5. At least five full years must intervene between a faculty member’s sabbaticals, index number not withstanding. 6. The Vice President for Academic Affairs sets the number of half-year sabbatical openings at least five years in advance, and forwards to the Board of Regents names of individuals who will be eligible for half and full year sabbaticals for the next three years. Faculty members are informed when their name has been forwarded to the Board of Regents for preliminary approval. 7. All faculty members will be informed annually by the Vice President of Academic Affairs their index number, as well as an estimate of the year that they will be eligible for sabbatical leave. Faculty members eligible for sabbatical leave will be notified by the dean of their respective colleges two years prior to the anticipated sabbatical date. This notification will include a copy of the sabbatical leave application instructions. 8. Normally, faculty members with the highest index number are granted sabbaticals if their sabbatical application meets the scholarship criteria. When there are more applications than sabbatical openings at a specific index number, the quality of the application and the potential benefit for Concordia University, St. Paul are used as prioritizing criteria in selecting sabbatical recipients. 9. Typically, half year sabbaticals at full pay are scheduled for July 1 – December 31, or January 1 – June 30 as desired by the individual faculty member, and a full year sabbatical at half pay covers one calendar year, and is scheduled from July 1 – June 30. However, if other dates would interfere less with teaching and administrative responsibilities, the faculty member may choose an alternative sabbatical schedule. The rationale for requesting the alternative dates should be provided in the sabbatical application. 10. The Vice President for Academic Affairs and the appropriate college dean make provisions for the workloads of the faculty members who have been granted a sabbatical. Guest instructors are provided with the adequate supplies, space, and equipment to carry out their assigned tasks. 11. A faculty member receiving a sabbatical leave may apply for an additional fellowship or grants for this period to help defray sabbatical costs 12. Faculty members on sabbatical continue to receive full Concordia Plans benefits. D. Sabbatical Leave Application Process: 1. The formal application for sabbatical leave is due October 1 of the academic year prior to the academic year in which the sabbatical is scheduled, and should include the components described below. A letter of support from the college dean should accompany the application detailing how the college/department proposes to cover the faculty member’s teaching and/or administrative workload. Faculty members are encouraged to make use of the resources of the Faculty Scholarship Center when preparing their proposal. An electronic version of the application form is available. 2. The application is submitted to the Faculty Development Policies Committee. The committee will review applications and may request additional information from the faculty member and/or work with the faculty member to strengthen the proposal if necessary. The committee shall forward its recommendations for sabbaticals to the Vice President for Academic Affairs by November 20. The Vice President for Academic Affairs makes his or her recommendations to the President of the institution by December 15, and, at the same time, informs the individual applicants of that recommendation. If an application is not recommended by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the faculty member next on the index number priority list will be invited to apply for a sabbatical leave. The President of the University forwards his or her recommendations to the Board of Regents. Upon recommendation from the president, the Board of Regents takes action on the requested sabbaticals in their January meeting. At any time in this recommendation process, if the recommendation is contrary to that of the Faculty Development Policies Committee, the committee may file a report advocating its position. The faculty member shall receive formal notification of the decision regarding the sabbatical application from the president of the institution within six months of the application. During the spring semester of the academic year, the Vice President for Academic Affairs shall publicize the names of the recipients of the sabbatical leaves for the following year. E. Format for Sabbatical Leave Application 1. Date of Application 2. Name of Faculty Member 3. Anticipated dates of sabbatical leave 4. Title of Sabbatical Project 5. Description of the project 6. Goals and objectives of the project 7. Work plan and time frame for the project 8. Any additional funds which will be received during the sabbatical 9 Timeliness of the project for faculty member’s career and for the institution 10. Description of qualifications faculty member possesses which will enable completion of the project 11. How and when the project will be evaluated 12. How and when the project’s results will be shared with others 13. Applicant’s signature and date F. Obligations of Sabbatical Recipient 1. Makes every reasonable effort to fulfill the terms of the sabbatical 2. Submits a revised plan to the VPAA for approval should circumstances nullify the first plan or if a new opportunity of greater professional value arises. The Vice President for Academic Affairs shall consult with the Faculty Development Committee before making a decision on the revised plan 3. Returns to the University for a minimum of one academic year following the completion of the sabbatical leave 4. Files a report of the sabbatical activities with the Faculty Development Committee and the Vice President for Academic Affairs immediately following the close of the sabbatical leave. This report includes an assessment of the faculty member’s achievement of the scholarship goals identified in the sabbatical leave application. 5. Shares the product of the sabbatical with the campus community in an appropriate way.

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2.72 Faculty Advancement in Rank
I. Eligibility for Advancement in Rank A. A Tenure-Track Instructor is eligible to be advanced to Assistant Professor when he/she has earned a transcripted terminal degree. B. An Assistant Professor is eligible to apply to be advanced to Associate Professor when he/she 1. Has served as an assistant professor for a minimum of four full-time years at Concordia University St. Paul by the time of the promotion (see appropriate Term Faculty policy for receiving credit toward advancement for years served as a Term Faculty with a terminal degree); 2. Has earned a transcripted terminal degree; 3. Has been recommended on the basis of the evaluation process indicated in Part II of this policy. C. An Associate Professor is eligible to apply to be advanced to Full Professor, when he/she 1. Has served as an associate professor for a minimum of six years at Concordia University, St. Paul by the time of the promotion. a. During a transitional period a five-year eligibility will be in effect: i. Associate professors who were advanced in July of 2013 will be eligible to apply in fall of 2017 for a 2018 advancement. ii. Associate professors who were advanced in July of 2014 or earlier will be eligible to apply in fall of 2018 for a 2019 advancement. iii. Associate professors who were advanced in July of 2015 will be eligible to apply in fall of 2019 for a 2020 advancement. 2. Has earned a transcripted terminal degree. 3. Has been recommended on the basis of the evaluation process indicated in Part II of this policy. II. Criteria Considered for Reappointment and Advancement in Rank Advancement in rank is based on merit, rather than being automatic or routine. In addition to the guidelines, as set forth by this document, the consideration is not an exhaustive measure of accomplishment and merit. These guidelines are intended to be a guide, in part, for the faculty member’s process of compiling documentation. Guidelines include the kinds of accomplishments that the committee will find pertinent for consideration for advancement. Advancement in Rank 1. Assistant Professor What is an assistant professor? Typically, the assistant professor is the entry level into the community of tenuretrack scholars and teachers at CSP. During this phase of a career, establishing oneself as a proficient teacher is paramount. The assistant professor must engage students and show proof of their learning and progress. In addition, the assistant professor begins to help build the CSP community through committees and other activities. Much of the assistant professor’s scholarship is the scholarship of learning, fine-tuning techniques that aid in student learning, and developing a scholarship agenda. 2. Associate Professor What is an associate professor? The associate professor is an established member of the CSP community. With mastery and control of teaching, the associate professor can move on to more service and to implementing the scholarship agenda. Associate professors must prove membership into a community of scholars by evidence of important scholarship: writing, presentations, knowledge creation, and exemplary service to their fields of inquiry. 3. Professor To be a Full Professor at CSP is a privileged position, but a position that assumes great responsibility. Full Professors have the weight of the responsibility of community maintenance. Full Professors are responsible for service, scholarship, teaching, and excellent deportment. They are the community role models. They are the leaders and mentors in the community. III. Documentation Preparing to Apply for Advancement 1. The annual performance review, the professional development plan and the university rubrics provide the basis for advancement preparation. The Advancement Committee meets regularly year round and is available to provide mentoring and feedback regarding how a faculty member’s work fits into the university rubrics. 2. All junior faculty should seek out mentors in their early years at Concordia University. These mentors will help the candidates understand and become invested in the Concordia community. 3. In the year prior to being a candidate for advancement, the faculty member must conduct an honest and intricate self-evaluation. Am I ready for advancement? Have I made sufficient achievements in all three categories: teaching, service, and scholarship? Have I enough evidence of these achievements to be considered a worthy candidate for advancement? 4. By the autumn of the year of advancement candidacy, the faculty member should consult with her/his department chair and dean(s). The faculty member may ask each of these people to evaluate her/his work against the rubrics and provide feedback. Prior performance evaluations should be used in these discussions. The faculty member may meet individually with the chair and the dean, or jointly with them. The department chair and dean have accountability to CSP to having only qualified candidates apply for advancement. 5. If the candidate, the department chair, and the dean determine that the candidate is ready to be seriously considered for advancement, the candidate should prepare a portfolio for advancement. 6. A potential candidate is unlikely to be advanced without the support of the department chair or dean, but may petition with the VPAA to submit their portfolio. ****************************************************************************** Instructions for Faculty Applying for Advancement in Rank It is expected that candidates being considered for advancement have the support of their department chair and/or dean before applying for advancement. Faculty candidates being considered for advancement shall make themselves available for the liaison meetings, the meeting discussion and any observations necessary for consideration. The portfolio contains materials completed since the last advancement and should be organized in the following manner: 1. Cover Page – a single page including: Name and Current Title, Department(s), College(s), Direct Supervisor(s), Dean(s), Academic Year, Desired Position if advanced 2. Letter of Introduction and Overall Summary – 1-2 page letter introducing themselves that includes a description of their roles and expectations at Concordia, based on the job description for which they were hired and retained. The summary should include arguments in favor of advancement for the candidate at this time. The applicant should specify their classification for their application, (Primarily: faculty/administrator and Primarily: undergraduate/graduate), and include a brief rationale for these classifications. 3. Required Overall Evidence It is the candidate’s responsibility to make it clear to the Advancement Committee that all criteria for advancement have been met. a. Curriculum Vitae b. Performance Reviews and Professional Development Plans (all since the last advancement) c. Letters of Recommendation  Immediate Supervisor  Dean of College  For graduate faculty; Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies  CSP Faculty member within candidate’s discipline  CSP Faculty member outside of candidate’s discipline  Professional within the candidate’s discipline outside CSP (optional)  Other letters of recommendation may be included within each portfolio section where appropriate (optional) 4. Section Summaries and Evidence– 3 summaries up to three pages each – 1 summary for each of these three sections is expected: Teaching, Scholarship and Service In each Section Summary, candidates should select their two or three major projects and/or overarching themes for each section area. These should highlight the candidate’s best examples in a given section area, thus making these the best arguments for their advancement at this time. The candidate is encouraged to be discerning and selective in the Section Summaries. NOTE: If an activity could fall into a reasonable definition of more than one of the three sections, (e.g.: Teaching and Service), the candidate is asked to select which Section is primary and which is secondary for that activity in order to aid the committee in its process. A. Teaching Section a. Section Summary b. Supporting evidence/documentation i. Student reviews of teaching ii. Supervisor reviews of teaching iii. Peer reviews of teaching (recommended) iv. Evidence of quality teaching as indicated in the criteria examples c. Additional evidence narrative- additional evidence not included in the Section Summary (Confirm portfolio size parameters with the Advancement Committee) d. Please refer to the required thresholds and confirm that it is clear to the committee that all Developing and Exemplary criteria have been met. B. Scholarship Section a. Section Summary b. Supporting evidence/documentation -Evidence of scholarship as indicated in the criteria examples c. Additional evidence narrative- additional evidence not included in the Section Summary (Confirm portfolio size parameters with the Advancement Committee) d. Please refer to the required thresholds and confirm that it is clear to the committee that all Developing and Exemplary criteria have been met. C. Service Section a. Section Summary b. Supporting evidence/documentation -Evidence of service as indicated in the criteria examples c. Additional evidence narrative- additional evidence not included in the Section Summary (Confirm portfolio size parameters with the Advancement Committee) d. Please refer to the required thresholds and confirm that it is clear to the committee that all Developing and Exemplary criteria have been met. 5. Other Proof of Evidence/Final Thoughts – a 1-2 page supplemental argument in favor of advancement for the candidate at this time based on materials going beyond, or not recognized by the other sections described in the Instructions.

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2.36 FACULTY EVALUATION PROCESS
A. Evaluations include criteria outlined in the Faculty Handbook Advancement In Rank Policy, 2.72. Course evaluations are completed by students in each faculty member’s course each semester. B. The following materials are used in the evaluation process for each faculty member. 1. Performance Review Form (procedure involves self-evaluation and supervisor evaluation) 2. Classroom Visitation Appraisal 3. Optional: Classroom Visitation Appraisal by selected peer 4. Student Evaluations Forms 5. Professional Development Plan C. Advancement In Rank, Contract Renewal, And Tenure 1. Advancement in rank materials are submitted as noted in 2.-36A. 2. Contract renewal: Recommendations for contract renewal of individual faculty members are sent to the president by the Vice President for Academic Affairs by August 31 for consideration by the Board of Regents at the September Board meeting. 3. Materials submitted for the March peer review process form the basis of the contract renewal recommendation. Division chairs may submit supplemental materials to the office of the dean of the faculty by August 31 if there are changes or additions for an individual faculty member after the March peer review process materials were submitted. 4. Tenure: Procedures for faculty members requesting tenure are as noted in 2.73 I and II.

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2.33 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN
A. Faculty members are responsible for keeping abreast with both the scholarship and the pedagogy of their field(s), and related areas. The faculty’s continuous growth and development help sustain their vitality, which should be apparent in the content and quality of their teaching and scholarship. B. The Professional Development Plan is fundamental to the faculty member’s role. It addresses needs in the person’s professional development, seeks to develop personal abilities, includes research to be undertaken, and integrates personal and professional plans with the University’s long range and short range needs and goals. C. Faculty members whose workloads consist of teaching responsibilities (without administrative assignment) develop their professional growth plans at the time of their evaluation as noted in 2.36. D. Format for the Professional Development Plan: 1. What strengths do you bring to your specific roles and areas of responsibility? 2. What professional gaps, weaknesses, or limitations do you face in meeting these responsibilities? 3. Describe the plans you have to strengthen these areas. 4. What resources are needed to help you develop professionally? 5. What are your long-range professional development plans? (Include new areas of responsibility in which you would like to serve, new skills you would like to develop, new knowledge you would like to learn, and so forth.) How do you plan to work towards achievement of these goals? 6. What steps are you taking to improve student engagement in your classes? 7. In what ways might the university best support your work at the university? 8. How well and in which specific areas do you think you are helping the institution achieve its overall goals? 9. Signature of faculty member and date.

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Scholarship and Teaching

2.894 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS POLICY
Preamble The parties to this agreement believe that the University’s interest is best served by creating an intellectual environment whereby creative efforts and innovations can be encouraged and rewarded, while still retaining for the University and its learning communities reasonable access to, and use of, the intellectual property for whose creation the University has provided assistance. The University supports the development, production, and dissemination of intellectual property by its faculty members. What is Intellectual Property? When used in this agreement, the term “Intellectual Property” shall be understood collectively to mean Copyrights, Patents, Patent Applications, and discoveries which are not protectable under the U.S. Patent laws, and Copyrights. When used in this agreement, the term “Copyright” shall be understood to mean that bundle of rights that protect original works of authorship fixed in any tangible medium of expression, now known or later developed, from which they can be perceived, reproduced, or otherwise communicated, either directly or with the aid of a machine or device. “Works of authorship” (including computer programs) include, but are not limited to the following: literary works; musical works, including any accompanying words; dramatic works, including any accompanying music; pantomimes and choreographic works; pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works (photographs, prints, diagrams, models, and technical drawings); motion pictures and other audiovisual works; sound recordings; and architectural works. “Tangible media” include, but are not limited to, books, periodicals, manuscripts, phonorecords, films, tapes, and disks. When used in this agreement, the term “Patent” shall be understood to mean that bundle of rights that protect inventions or discoveries which constitute any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof; new and ornamental designs for any useful article and plant patents being for the asexual reproduction of a distinct variety of plant, including cultivated sprouts, mutants, hybrids, and new found seedlings, other than a tuber propagated plant or plant found in an uncultivated state. Who Owns the Intellectual Property? Intellectual property created, made, or originated by a faculty member* shall be the sole and exclusive property of the faculty member author or inventor, except as he or she may voluntarily choose to transfer such property, in full, or in part, except as provided below: a. In accepting grants, fellowships, or other donations for research projects from private business or industry and from the federal government, the University generally must obligate itself to such sponsors under invention and patent clauses in the agreement with such sponsors. In these situations, the sponsor and/or the University may be the owner . b. If the University has specifically directed the faculty member to engage in research and a written agreement is entered into between the University and the faculty member, then the resulting intellectual property shall be owned as set forth in such written agreement. c. The University shall own copyright in the following three circumstances: 1. The University expressly directs a faculty member to create a specified work, or the work is created as a specific requirement of employment or as an assigned institutional duty that may, for example, be included in a written job description or an employment agreement. 2. The faculty member author has voluntarily transferred the copyright, in whole or in part to the institution. Such transfer shall be in the form of a written document signed by the faculty member author. 3. The University (including without limitation natural persons, employees, agents, consultants and contractors of the University) contributed to a “joint work” under the Copyright Act. The University can exercise joint ownership under this clause when it has contributed specialized services and facilities to the production of the work that goes beyond what is traditionally provided to faculty members generally in the preparation of their course materials. Such latter arrangement is to be agreed to in writing, in advance, and in full conformance with other provisions of this policy. Intellectual property owned by the University may generally be used by faculty members in the performance of their duties at the University; provided, however, that the University may prohibit such use upon written notice to the faculty member (e.g., in the case where a research sponsor has prohibited such use). Any other faculty member use of intellectual property owned by the University must be approved by the University. Faculty members are encouraged to negotiate with the University a contract which clearly delineates the use and dissemination of any of the above work. Any and all trademarks, service marks, trade names, and other indicia, marks, and designations of the University are the sole and exclusive property of the University. Such marks are not included under the term intellectual property and no rights to any of such marks are granted and/or conveyed to any faculty member hereunder. WHO MAY USE THE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY? Material created for ordinary teaching use in the classroom and in department programs, such as syllabi, assignments, and tests, shall remain the property of the faculty author, but the University shall be permitted to use such material for internal instructional, educational, and administrative purposes, including satisfying requests of accreditation agencies for faculty-authored syllabi and course descriptions. In an agreement transferring copyright for such works to a publisher, faculty authors shall provide rights for the University to use such works for internal instructional, educational, and administrative purposes. DISTRIBUTION OF ANY FUNDS GENERATED Funds received by the faculty member from the sale, licensing, rental, lease, and/or other disposition of intellectual property owned by the faculty member author or inventor shall be allocated and expended as determined solely by the faculty member author or inventor. Funds received by the University from the sale, licensing, rental, lease, and/or other disposition of intellectual property owned by the University shall be allocated and expended as determined solely by the University. Funds received by the faculty member and the University from the sale of intellectual property owned jointly by the faculty member and the University shall be allocated and expended in accordance with a specific agreement. If no written agreement is in place, then the parties agree to submit the issue to the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. The parties agree to be bound by the determination of that committee. In the event of multiple creators, the creators will determine the allocation their individual shares when the work is first undertaken. If no written agreement is entered into prior to undertaking the work, then the parties agree to submit the issue to the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. The parties agree to be bound by the determination of that committee. HOW TO RESOLVE EMERGING ISSUES AND DISPUTES The Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee will be composed of six members equally apportioned between faculty (elected by the Faculty Senate) and University administration (appointed by the president or his designee.). The committee members shall elect a chair from among themselves each year and will convene only when called upon to address issues or resolve disputes regarding intellectual property rights. At the time of initial appointment or election, each member shall be designated as serving a one or two, or three-year term, so that the term of one faculty committee member and one administration member will expire each year and replacements will be appointed or elected each year. After the first appointment subsequent members shall serve a three-year term, commencing on July 1 and terminating on June 30. Committee members may serve one additional three-year term. A seventh member shall also be included on the Committee each year. The term of the seventh member shall be for one year commencing on or about July 1 and terminating on the following June 30. The seventh member shall not vote except for the purpose of breaking a tie vote among the other members of the Committee. The seventh member may not be a member of the University or faculty. Such seventh member shall be selected by a majority of the Committee as the first order of business by the Committee at the start of each term (e.g., at the first meeting of the Committee subsequent to July 1). It is recognized that the seventh member may not be called upon to attend every meeting of the Committee and that such seventh member will generally be selected from the local or regional community (e.g., an educator, business person, academic, politician or other person). The Committee shall monitor and review technological and legislative changes affecting intellectual property policy and shall report to relevant faculty and administrative bodies, when such changes affect existing policies. The Committee shall serve as a forum for the receipt and discussion of proposals to change existing institutional policy and/or to provide recommendations for contract negotiations. In many cases where ideas, inventions, and discoveries are produced within the University, it is difficult to trace the origin to a specific individual or individuals and often difficult to determine the relative rights of the individuals and organizations, including the University, involved. Therefore, disputes over ownership, and its attendant rights, of intellectual property will be decided by the Intellectual Property Policy and Rights Committee. However, the purpose of this committee is not to address copyright “fair-use” issues. The Committee shall make an initial determination of whether the University or any other party has rights to the invention or other creation, and, if so, the basis and extent of those rights. The Committee shall also make a determination on resolving competing faculty claims to ownership when the parties cannot reach an agreement on their own. The Committee will review the merits of inventions, and other creations, and make recommendations for the management of the invention, including development, patenting, and exploitation. If the University and/or the inventors/creators disagree with the determination of the committee, then the University and/or he/she may appeal to binding arbitration. The cost of the arbitration shall be borne equally by the University and the creator(s). *Note: This policy is intended to apply to all members of the university community – faculty, staff, administration and students. Policy based on suggestions and guidelines created by American Association of University Professors, 1012 Fourteenth Street, NW, Suite #500; Washington, DC 20005 Reviewed by lawyers May, 2002 Recommended to Senate by Faculty Policies Committee May 7, 2002

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2.89 TRAVEL FOR PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS
A. Policy: The University encourages faculty attendance at professional conferences and meetings. B. Procedures 1. Full-time tenure-track faculty members are provided funds (up to 2% of the base salary of an assistant professor) for professional conference attendance each academic year. 2. Prior to attending the conference, the faculty member should submit an application which includes the title of the conference, goals the individual has for attending, and a budget of expenses to his or her department chair or dean for approval. 3. As an assessment tool, upon returning from the conference, the faculty member shall provide to the dean of his or her college a summary of the conference and its applicability to the faculty member’s professional interests and teaching responsibilities. 4. If a faculty member does not use his or her travel funds, the dean of his or her college may make those funds available to other faculty members with exceptional travel needs. Any remaining travel fund money will be transferred to the quasi-endowment for faculty development grants.

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2.884 FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP CENTER
A. Policy: The University supports a Faculty Scholarship Center. The mission of the Faculty Scholarship Center is to promote the preparation of students through the encouragement and facilitation of the faculty’s professional growth and scholarship in the areas of discovery, teaching, application, and integration. The director of the Faculty Scholarship Center serves as member of the Faculty Development Policies Committee and reports to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Faculty Development Policies Committee oversees the activities of the Faculty Scholarship Center and advises the director. B. Procedures 1. The Faculty Scholarship Center is faculty run and driven. 2. The director of the Faculty Scholarship Center is appointed for a three year, renewable by the Vice President for Academic Affairs upon recommendation of the Faculty Development Policies Committee from nominees submitted by the faculty. The director shall be a full time member of the faculty in a tenured or tenure track position employed 2/3 time by the Faculty Scholarship Center, while maintaining a minimum teaching load of one course per semester, or 1/3 time teaching. The director shall be replaced in his or her department for teaching and other load responsibilities. The director is a permanent voting member of the Faculty Development Policies Committee during her or his tenure as director. 3. The Faculty Scholarship Center will be only indirectly connected to performance review. Individual faculty members may request services from the center that will enhance her or his review process in areas related to scholarship. However, the Faculty Scholarship Center will not function as an evaluation center. 4. The model upon which the Faculty Scholarship Center is based, and a listing of various activities related to the scholarship of teaching, discovery, application, and integration is available in the Faculty Scholarship Center.

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2.74 SABBATICAL LEAVES
A. Each institution shall state policies regarding sabbaticals for faculty and leave of absence procedures for all employees within Board for Higher Education guidelines. (2001 Synodical Handbook 6.57) B. The purpose of a sabbatical leave is to provide a time of scholarly renewal for the faculty member. It is assumed that this renewal comes when the faculty member has sufficient time to devote to study and exploration in his or her field. Therefore, the primary criterion for approval of sabbatical leave is evidence of scholarly activity. This may include professional growth activities such as significant research, creative work, advanced studies, and special discipline-related service to the district, synod, or other external education or government agencies. The sabbatical project should lead to a deeper and broader understanding of one’s discipline and/or to an understanding of a new discipline. Recipients of sabbatical leaves should be prepared to provide some tangible evidence of scholarly achievement. This may include (but is not limited to) such things as published articles, professional presentations, and creative works. The sabbatical leave application should clearly identify the scholarship goals. C. Procedures: 1. Full time ranked faculty receive consideration for a sabbatical based upon their index number. Those with the highest index number will ordinarily receive priority consideration for a half-year sabbatical. The index number is determined by years of service at synodical institutions of higher education minus the number of previous sabbaticals (at Concordia University, St. Paul or other synodical institutions of higher education) multiplied by nine. Example: Professor X has served synodical institutions of higher education as a full-time ranked faculty member for 23 years, with two sabbaticals. Professor X’s index number would be determined as follows: 23 years of full-time service -18 (2 previous sabbaticals, 2 x 9 = 18) 5 (index number) 2. A Leave of Absence has no effect on the individual’s index number. 3. Individuals with an index number of seven or higher and who have not had a sabbatical in the last five full years may apply for a full year sabbatical at any time. Full year sabbaticals are granted in addition to the previously determined number of half-year sabbaticals. 4. Faculty coming to the University from other synodical institutions of higher education must serve a minimum of 2 years at Concordia University, St. Paul prior to receiving a sabbatical, index number not withstanding. Faculty members who have served at non-synodical institutions of higher learning will be given one index number for every two years served at those institutions, not to exceed an index number of four. 5. At least five full years must intervene between a faculty member’s sabbaticals, index number not withstanding. 6. The Vice President for Academic Affairs sets the number of half-year sabbatical openings at least five years in advance, and forwards to the Board of Regents names of individuals who will be eligible for half and full year sabbaticals for the next three years. Faculty members are informed when their name has been forwarded to the Board of Regents for preliminary approval. 7. All faculty members will be informed annually by the Vice President of Academic Affairs their index number, as well as an estimate of the year that they will be eligible for sabbatical leave. Faculty members eligible for sabbatical leave will be notified by the dean of their respective colleges two years prior to the anticipated sabbatical date. This notification will include a copy of the sabbatical leave application instructions. 8. Normally, faculty members with the highest index number are granted sabbaticals if their sabbatical application meets the scholarship criteria. When there are more applications than sabbatical openings at a specific index number, the quality of the application and the potential benefit for Concordia University, St. Paul are used as prioritizing criteria in selecting sabbatical recipients. 9. Typically, half year sabbaticals at full pay are scheduled for July 1 – December 31, or January 1 – June 30 as desired by the individual faculty member, and a full year sabbatical at half pay covers one calendar year, and is scheduled from July 1 – June 30. However, if other dates would interfere less with teaching and administrative responsibilities, the faculty member may choose an alternative sabbatical schedule. The rationale for requesting the alternative dates should be provided in the sabbatical application. 10. The Vice President for Academic Affairs and the appropriate college dean make provisions for the workloads of the faculty members who have been granted a sabbatical. Guest instructors are provided with the adequate supplies, space, and equipment to carry out their assigned tasks. 11. A faculty member receiving a sabbatical leave may apply for an additional fellowship or grants for this period to help defray sabbatical costs 12. Faculty members on sabbatical continue to receive full Concordia Plans benefits. D. Sabbatical Leave Application Process: 1. The formal application for sabbatical leave is due October 1 of the academic year prior to the academic year in which the sabbatical is scheduled, and should include the components described below. A letter of support from the college dean should accompany the application detailing how the college/department proposes to cover the faculty member’s teaching and/or administrative workload. Faculty members are encouraged to make use of the resources of the Faculty Scholarship Center when preparing their proposal. An electronic version of the application form is available. 2. The application is submitted to the Faculty Development Policies Committee. The committee will review applications and may request additional information from the faculty member and/or work with the faculty member to strengthen the proposal if necessary. The committee shall forward its recommendations for sabbaticals to the Vice President for Academic Affairs by November 20. The Vice President for Academic Affairs makes his or her recommendations to the President of the institution by December 15, and, at the same time, informs the individual applicants of that recommendation. If an application is not recommended by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the faculty member next on the index number priority list will be invited to apply for a sabbatical leave. The President of the University forwards his or her recommendations to the Board of Regents. Upon recommendation from the president, the Board of Regents takes action on the requested sabbaticals in their January meeting. At any time in this recommendation process, if the recommendation is contrary to that of the Faculty Development Policies Committee, the committee may file a report advocating its position. The faculty member shall receive formal notification of the decision regarding the sabbatical application from the president of the institution within six months of the application. During the spring semester of the academic year, the Vice President for Academic Affairs shall publicize the names of the recipients of the sabbatical leaves for the following year. E. Format for Sabbatical Leave Application 1. Date of Application 2. Name of Faculty Member 3. Anticipated dates of sabbatical leave 4. Title of Sabbatical Project 5. Description of the project 6. Goals and objectives of the project 7. Work plan and time frame for the project 8. Any additional funds which will be received during the sabbatical 9 Timeliness of the project for faculty member’s career and for the institution 10. Description of qualifications faculty member possesses which will enable completion of the project 11. How and when the project will be evaluated 12. How and when the project’s results will be shared with others 13. Applicant’s signature and date F. Obligations of Sabbatical Recipient 1. Makes every reasonable effort to fulfill the terms of the sabbatical 2. Submits a revised plan to the VPAA for approval should circumstances nullify the first plan or if a new opportunity of greater professional value arises. The Vice President for Academic Affairs shall consult with the Faculty Development Committee before making a decision on the revised plan 3. Returns to the University for a minimum of one academic year following the completion of the sabbatical leave 4. Files a report of the sabbatical activities with the Faculty Development Committee and the Vice President for Academic Affairs immediately following the close of the sabbatical leave. This report includes an assessment of the faculty member’s achievement of the scholarship goals identified in the sabbatical leave application. 5. Shares the product of the sabbatical with the campus community in an appropriate way.

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3.34 CONVOCATIONS
A. Concordia University will support, through budgeting and scheduling, an ongoing series of convocations throughout the traditional school year. The frequency of these events will be approximately two per month and will normally be facilitated by the Faculty Scholarship Center Director. B. The intent of this Convocation series is to supplement the educational experience of the Concordia community and to provide an atmosphere of lifelong learning beyond the classroom setting. C. Convocation attendance may be required of students by their professors in support of coursework. D. Like Chapel, classes and other campus activities should not be scheduled in conflict with the announced convocation program schedule.

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Student Academic Policies

2.782 STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE REGARDING FACULTY
A. Introduction. Concordia University is committed to a policy of treating fairly all members of the University’s community in regard to their personal and professional concerns. However, times do occur in which students think they have been mistreated. This procedure is provided in order to ensure that students are aware of the way in which their problems with a faculty member can be resolved informally and to provide a more formal reconciliation process when needed. B. Definition. A grievance is defined as dissatisfaction occurring when a student believes that any conduct or condition affecting his or her academic performance is unjust or inequitable. A grievance arises when a student believes, based on established academic policies and procedures (as per the course syllabus), that he or she has been treated in an arbitrary or capricious manner by a member of the university faculty. C. Grievances Covered by this Policy A grievance against a university faculty member arises when a student believes he or she has been subjected to inappropriate behavior by a faculty member acting within their role and duty. (Some examples could include: “my professor makes insulting remarks,” “my professor grades males harder than females,” “my professor did not cover the material in the syllabus,” etc.) D. Grievances Not Covered by this Policy. 1. This policy relates to student grievances regarding faculty behavior. It does not relate to those grievances regarding sexual harassment (Faculty Policy Appendix A) or academic grievances (Student Handbook 118E). 2. Title IX Reports – issues of sexual harassment, discrimination or sexual misconduct should be reported to the Title IX Coordinator, Dr. Cheryl Chatman. An online report may also be made by going to www.csp.edu/reporting and completing the form. Bringing a Complaint: 1. Informal Grievance Resolution In keeping with the University’s Mission Statement and in following the guidelines presented in Matthew 18:15, a student will first speak directly to the faculty member regarding his/her grievance. (The student is welcome to bring along a support person to the discussion.). 2. Formal Grievance Resolution a) Formal complaints by students need to be brought forward within 30 days of the alleged incident. b) If the complaint is not resolved by speaking with the faculty member, the student will confer directly with the faculty member’s direct supervisor, and in so doing, will initiate the mediation process. If the student has by- passed talking directly with the faculty member, the supervisor will send her/him to talk with that faculty member. At no time will the faculty member be asked to defend charges without knowing who is making the charge. c) As the first step in the mediation process, the student will present the faculty member’s supervisor with a written complaint. A copy of the complaint will be given to the faculty member at least one day prior to the scheduled mediation. Mediation will involve the supervisor (or a faculty member appointed by the supervisor), faculty member and student. The student may bring a support person with him/her to the mediation meeting. d) If mediation is unsuccessful, and the supervisor finds the complaint to be substantial, the next step may be taken. The supervisor will take the student’s written statement and, if submitted, the faculty member’s written response to the next direct supervisor (usually the College Dean or V.P. of Academic Affairs). The two supervisors will first meet with the student and then with the faculty member. If deemed necessary, the supervisors will contact Human Resources to arrange for an investigation into the complaint by a trained arbitrator*. If there is an investigation, the faculty member will be notified at least 1 day prior to the start of the investigation. The arbitrator’s report will be shared with the faculty member and the student. The faculty member’s direct supervisor will keep the written report. During the arbitration investigation, any discussions with the student and faculty member may be recorded and must be kept confidential. All parties involved in these proceedings are held accountable for keeping the information confidential. ● If the faculty member is put on leave during the investigation, the faculty member will receive a letter informing him/her of the status of the leave (ex. duration, pay, status etc.). ● If the faculty member deems it appropriate to seek legal counsel, Concordia University will interpret that choice as a part of the faculty member’s due process and not as an act of ill faith. 3. If the grievance is substantiated during any step of the process, the next supervisor (V.P of Academic Affairs or the President) will be involved to determine the appropriate action to take with the faculty member. This resolution is final. * Arbitration: A faculty person should have fair, unbiased arbitration when a formal complaint is filed and the appropriate resolution process, although followed, has been unsuccessful. The arbitrator will be trained in the arbitration process and its legal ramifications. During the arbitration process, the arbitrator will speak to the person who has made the allegation and then to the faculty member being charged. Each person may submit a list of contact information for people who could give pertinent information and who may be interviewed.

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2.781 FACULTY GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE INVOLVING STUDENTS
Students are accountable to behave in accordance to the Code of Student Conduct (Student Handbook, Section 118). In the academic environment of the classroom, any student whose conduct conflicts with the University’s stated principles and guidelines may be asked to leave the classroom by the professor. The professor will then follow the guidelines presented in S.H. 118, Disciplinary Procedures. The disciplinary procedure starts with a written report given to the Judicial Officer. Professors may file an incident report for any violation to the Code of Student Conduct and are not limited to the classroom environment. Incident report forms are available in the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs or online in the Student Handbook appendix.

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University Values

2.71 STATEMENT ON ACADEMIC FREEDOM
A. Concordia University seeks to develop the whole person. In the pursuit of this purpose and in keeping with Concordia University’s mission statement the faculty and students of Concordia are free to investigate, to teach, to learn, and to discuss those things which have interested scholars and other educated men and women. B. Members of the instructional staff including faculty members are entitled to all the liberties which are accorded citizens of our country, subject only to the demands of their profession.

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3.40 FACULTY MEETING AND COMMUNITY SPACE
A. Faculty meeting and community space is required for faculty interaction, meetings and community building. B. A faculty lounge is located on the third floor of the administration building. C. It is open for eating lunches, reading, relaxation, and informal conversation.

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Academic Degrees: Majors, Minors, Certificates, Courses

6.631 INSTITUTIONAL ARTICULATION AGREEMENTS
A. Articulation agreements are the protocols for academic relationships between units of academic governance for the purpose of benefiting students and prospective students at two institutions. B. The purpose of such agreements is to insure programs of academic quality, to encourage student achievement, and to facilitate the transfer of course credits and a smooth transition from one academic institution to another. C. Articulation agreements are initiated by the deans of the colleges in coordination with partner institution officials and liaisons. D. The approval of the college dean, department chair(s), and the office of the registrar are necessary for ratifying an articulation agreement. E. Articulation with another institution will be considered on the basis of 1. the educational quality of the institution with which the articulation is sought; 2. the comparability of the nature, content, and level of the program to that offered at Concordia; 3. congruence with the University’s mission, curricula, and standards for student achievement; 4. alignment of student learning outcomes. F. The registrar (in consultation with department chair(s)) will review course descriptions and catalogs to determine if programs at the other institution are compatible with academic aims and purposes of Concordia University. G. The primary responsibility for the evaluation of the general education curriculum will be with the registrar. 1. Departments will be consulted if appropriateness and compatibility of the credits is in question. 2. The definitions of general education provided by the Higher Learning Commission and by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education will be used when evaluating credits. H. Courses approved through articulation into a program do not guarantee articulation into another program of the University. (e.g. A statistics course could satisfy the math requirement for a science program but not necessarily satisfy the math requirement in another program.) I. Articulation agreements are reported to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and will be reviewed by the department chair(s) and institutional liaisons on a regular basis.

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6.50 GENERAL EDUCATION MISSION STATEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION
A. Mission Statement General education at Concordia University, Saint Paul introduces students to academic content areas central to the classical liberal arts and to the university’s identity, as expressed in its mission statement, and to the most essential components of these areas; it develops and cultivates skills requisite to any intellectual or professional endeavor; and it does so in a manner attentive to the abstract or methodological dimensions of the subject at hand. B. Implementation This mission statement is satisfied when the objectives and learning activities of any course proposed for general education credit (in all colleges of the university) are sufficiently broad so as to cover the principle aspects of the appropriate general education discipline or content area(s), as these have been identified by the university faculty and enumerated in the catalog, and when the course fosters student development in at least one of the following ways: a. skill in analysis, synthesis, integration, research, or evaluation; b. skill in problem solving, or in the application of the foregoing abilities to solve problems; c. skill in creative expression or design; d. skill in ethical reasoning or decision-making (in part by applying such core concepts as Christian vocation, responsibility and rights, liberty and justice, etc.); or, e. appreciation for human interaction and expression in smaller and larger communities, with all of the complexity this entails.

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6.40 REVIEW OF EXISTING ACADEMIC MAJORS, MINORS, SPECIALITIES, AND EMPHASES
All existing academic majors, minors, specialties, emphases, and other academic offerings of the university are subject to an annual review using criteria administered by the Vice President for Academic Affairs.

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6.30 CHANGING CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS
A. Changing a Course 1. The individual instructor may make course revisions for upgrading and updating. 2. If the course objectives or purpose of the class are to be altered, the chair of the department is to approve the revisions. A revised syllabus that has been approved by the department chair shall be submitted to the dean of the college. 3. When the change involves a course that meets state of Minnesota teaching licensure standards, the department is asked to consult with the teacher education unit. B. Changing a General Education Requirement 1. The following require approval by the General Education Committee, with prior approvals by department chair. a. Substantive changes to a course description and/or course learning outcomes, b. Change to departmentally selected University Outcomes, or c. Addition or deletion of a course from the current general education course offerings. 2. The following require approval first by the General Education Committee and, second, by the Undergraduate Policies Committee, with report to The Faculty Senate: a. Changes to the structure (e.g., required content areas), b. Size (i.e., total numbers of credits), or c. Overall philosophy (e.g., required outcomes vs. required courses). C. Changing the requirements of a major, minor, emphasis, or certificate (MMEC) 1. The department that is proposing the change consults all other departments affected by the change. 2. The department with prime responsibility for the MMEC may propose the replacement of a course(s) or addition of course options within credit limits set by the Undergraduate Policies Committee. If the changes do not increase the total number of credit hours in the approved MMEC only department and dean of the college approvals are needed. 3. Proposals increasing the number of credits in the MMEC must be approved by the Undergraduate Policies Committee. 4. When the change involves a course that meets state of Minnesota teaching licensure standards, the department is asked to consult with the teacher education unit. 5. Once approvals are obtained, the department chair completes the Academic Change Form and submits it to the dean. Upon approval, the dean submits the form to the VPAA. With VPAA approval, the form is forwarded to the Registrar’s office, the appropriate faculty members, administrators, and publications

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6.24a INDEPENDENTLY DESIGNED MAJORS AND MINORS
A. Timing: A proposal for an individually designed major must be submitted to the department housing the major prior to degree completion. A proposal for an individually designed minor must be submitted prior to degree completion. B. Approval: The major must be approved by the department providing a plurality of the credits and by the chairperson of each department providing 12 or more credits. The minor must be approved by the chairperson of the department providing a plurality of the credits. C. Housing: The major or minor will be “housed” in the department providing the plurality of the credits. D. Outcomes: The department housing the major or minor will be responsible for certifying the outcomes. E. Individually designed majors and minors will include the language “individually designed” in the nomenclature on the transcript.

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6.22 Form 1 Proposal for a New Undergraduate Major, Minor, Emphasis, or Certificate
Step One: Please meet with the Vice President for Academic Affairs or his/her designee before beginning this process in order to determine which sections of this proposal form you need to complete and which departments or individuals are required for approval, review, or notification. An appropriate Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) code will be determined at this time. Date of preliminary proposal meeting with VPAA: Sections of the form that are required: Step Two: Complete sections of the form indicated by VPAA. Step Three: Distribute for approvals, reviews, and notifications as indicated. A. Characteristics of the Proposed Program Full name of the proposed program, the specific degree (if applicable) or the instructional level (e.g., bachelor’s-level certificate): Six-digit CIP code of the program. (See above.) The total credit hours required for completion of the program (apart from general education and electives): Normal or typical length of time for students to complete the program: The proposed initial date for implementation of the program: The primary target audience for the program (e.g., full-time, part-time, traditional college age, working adults, transfer students, military personnel, etc.): 1. Describe the key dynamics — institutional mission and internal or external forces — that stimulated and shaped this proposal. 2. Discuss how this program would help realize Concordia’s Mission and Promise Statement. B. Identify External Accreditation, Advisory Groups, and/or Key Partnerships Supporting the Program If you are planning any involvement by external organizations (other than accredited higher education institutions) in key operations as identified below, provide the information requested for each planned involvement. Type of involvement Name(s) of external organization(s) Estimated % of Involvement A. Recruitment and admission of students (e.g., The Learning House) B. Course placement and advising of students C. Design and oversight of curriculum D. Direct instruction and oversight E. Other support for delivery of instruction C. Institutional Planning for Proposed Program 3. Briefly describe the planning process for determining the need for this new program, including the role of faculty in the process. 4. What are the physical facilities and equipment needed to support the program? Indicate the impact that the proposed change will have on the physical resources and laboratories that currently accommodate existing programs and services, or identify new laboratory and resource needs. 5. What is the evidence that a market for the new program exists? How has estimated program demand been factored into realistic enrollment projections? How has this evidence been used in planning and budgeting processes to develop a quality program that can be sustained? 6. If the program request is approved, what future growth do you anticipate (e.g., in the next six months, three years) and how do you plan to manage this growth (e.g., workload adjustments, additional instructors, etc.)? 7. Obtain a program cost model from the Chief Operating Officer and include below. How does this program fit into the current and expected financial picture of the institution? In particular, will the program be financially self-sufficient within three years? If not, when do you expect the program to be financially self-sufficient and how do you expect the program to operate until then? (Please work with your dean on this item.) Example: Program Cost Model Academic Year 13/14 14/15 15/16 16/17 17/18 Number of Students 15 30 40 40 40 Credits Generated – 8 per semester: Fall 120 240 320 320 320 Spring 120 240 320 320 320 Summer 120 240 320 320 320 Cost per credit $460 $470 $480 $490 $500 Total Revenue $165,600 $338,400 $460,800 $470,400 $480,000 Salaries $50,000 $80,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 Other expenses $50,000 $70,000 $90,000 $110,000 $130,000 Total Expenses $100,000 $140,000 $275,000 $350,000 $400,000 Profit/(Loss) $65,600 $198,400 $185,800 $120400 $80,000 8. What controls are in place to ensure that the information presented to students in advertising, brochures, and other communications will be accurate? D. Curriculum and Instructional Design 9. List the program learning outcomes. 10. List all the courses that comprise the program. Include course descriptions and number of credit hours for each. 11. What are the requirements students must fulfill to complete the program successfully (including specific courses, course options, and any other requirements)? Total number of credits for the program? 12. For programs using prior learning credit, compressed time frames, online delivery, accelerated formats, or other innovative approaches to learning, explain how the institution will ensure that student work and the levels of knowledge and competencies comparable to those required in traditional formats have been achieved? E. Institutional Staffing, Faculty, and Student Support 13. How many and what types (full-time, part-time, adjunct) of faculty will be employed in the program? Why is the number of fulltime faculty members adequate to support the program? 14. What will the impact of the new initiative have on current faculty workload? 15. What library and information resources—general as well as specific to the program(s)—and staffing and services are in place to support the initiative? 16. In a separate document, provide a brief listing that inventories each faculty member employed to teach in the program, including names of existing personnel, a description of each faculty member’s academic qualifications, their prior instructional responsibility and other experiences relevant to the courses they will teach in the program in question, each faculty member’s course load in the new program, and the course work each teaches in other programs currently offered. Document scholarship and research capability of each faculty member. F. Evaluation 17. Describe the process for monitoring, evaluating, and improving the overall effectiveness and quality of the program, including student persistence and completion. (Consult Associate Vice President for Assessment and Accreditation) 18. Attach the Assessment Plan (6.22 Form 2) approved by the Assessment Council. G. Approvals, Reviews, and/or Notifications Specific approvals, reviews, and notifications needed should be determined by the VPAA at the outset of the proposal process. Approvals, Reviews, and/or Notifications Approvals, Reviews, and/or Notifications Needed (√) Date OFFICIAL USE ONLY Supporting Documents Received Department — approval College approval Enrollment: Assoc. VP for Enrollment Management — review Accreditation: Assoc. VP for Assessment & Accreditation — review Assessment Council — approval of assessment plan (6.221) Vice President for Academic Affairs — approval Senior Vice President — approval Undergraduate Policies Committee — approval Faculty Senate — report Registrar — notification Submitted Concordia University System Submitted to Minnesota Office of Higher Education Submitted to Higher Learning Commission Assessment Plan for the Proposed Major or Minor in: Date of Submission to Assessment Council: Department: College: Indicate graduate or undergraduate: Step One: Identify Your Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) and the Assessment Activities Used to Measure Them. Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) Assessment Activities/Artifacts List each SLO separately. Include at least 3 but not more than 8. These learning outcomes should distinguish students in this major/minor from students in other majors/minors. At the completion of the program, students will be able to: What will you use to determine how well students have actually met each of these outcomes? (E.g., final presentation/paper/project, tests, capstone project, or other activity that demonstrates the degree to which students have achieved the learning outcome.) Each SLO requires at least one activity to measure it. 1. 2. 3. Step Two: Determine What Tool/Methods Your Department Will Use to Compile and Analyze Individual Student Results Aggregation and Analysis of Assessment Results How will the results of these assessments of individual students be aggregated and analyzed so that they provide useful information to your department, e.g., strengths and weaknesses of curriculum, instruction, student preparation, etc.? (For example, use the eLumen database, use a compilation of faculty tally lists, create a qualitative summary of all the data, etc.) Step Three: Determine What Process Your Department Will Use to Share Data and Take Actions for Improvement Use of Assessment Results for Improvement Describe the process your department will use to share assessment results and their implications for the major and for student learning with all department faculty (e.g., annual assessment retreat/meeting; executive summary, etc.)? Who will coordinate this process? What will be the decision-making process for actions to be taken in response to needed improvements? Who will compile the annual university assessment report for this major? Name of Proposal Submitter: Date of Department Approval: Assessment Council Feedback: Date of Assessment Council Approval:

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6.22 INTRODUCTION OF AN UNDERGRADUATE MAJOR, MINOR, CERTIFICATE, OR ENDORSEMENT
1. Elements of a proposal a. Academics i. The proposal will provide a rationale for the program and articulate its consistency with the mission of the university. ii. The proposal will state program objectives and Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) outcomes. iii. The proposal will demonstrate conformity with definitions (Policy 6.12) adopted by The Faculty. iv. The proposal will state curricular requirements. v. The proposal will list all course titles and descriptions in the program. b. Resources i. The proposal will demonstrate an established need for the program, in particular addressing marketability. ii. The proposal will show financial viability. iii. The proposal will present an operational budget for the first three years of the program. iv. The proposal will demonstrate that sufficient resources are in place for the operation of the program in terms of facility and faculty. Normally there will be one full-time faculty member administering the major who holds a terminal degree appropriate to the major and more than one full-time and/or adjunct faculty members with at least a Master’s degree appropriate to the major teaching in the program. Exceptions to this policy must have the expressed approval of the Undergraduate Policies Committee (UPC). Accrediting agencies require a rationale why the number of full-time faculty is adequate to support the program. c. Assessment i. The proposal will identify Student Learning Outcomes and the assessment activities used to measure them. ii. The proposal will state what tool/methods will be used to compile and analyze individual student results. iii. The proposal will discuss what process the department will use to share data and take actions for improvement. 2. Criteria for evaluating a proposal a. Academic components of the proposal must be of a quality comparable to or exceeding similar programming at competitive institutions and must conform to criteria set by appropriate accrediting bodies. b. Resource components of the proposal must be appropriate to the field, comparable to competitive universities, and conform to strategic priorities and financial requirements set by the university. c. Assessment components of the proposal must be valid and comparable to or exceed practices generally employed at the university. 3. Approval a. Proposals require the recommendation of the department, the college, the vice-president for academic affairs (VPAA), senior vice-president, and the assessment council. Additional consultations and notifications may be necessary. b. Proposals are approved by the UPC. Approval of new majors requires a 2/3 majority vote. All others require a simple majority. c. Primary responsibility for evaluating academic components resides with the UPC and VPAA. Resource components require clearance from the senior vice president. Assessment components are the responsibility of the assessment council. d. The UPC may not approve a proposal until it has received documented recommendations from the department, the college, the VPAA, the senior vice president, and the assessment council. e. The chair of UPC will report approvals of all new programs to Faculty Senate. 4. Types of Proposals a. Class A: Typical new major/minor/endorsement/certificate involving new courses and/or requiring additional resources (faculty, library, physical plant). (Where appropriate, a new major will also include a comparable minor.) Must complete 6.22 Form 1 (Proposal Form) and Form 2 (Assessment Plan). b. Class B: A major/minor/endorsement/certificate that repackages currently offered content in a different or interdisciplinary way. No new classes or increased offerings of current classes are necessary to launch the major/minor. However, if the new program requires a new Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP), then it may require completing the Class A requirements. 1. The proposal will include: a. A rationale for the program and its connection with the mission of the university. b. Program Student Learning Outcomes c. List of requirements d. Course descriptions 2. Obtain Department(s) and college(s) approvals. 3. Complete Assessment Plan (6.22 Form 2) and submit to assessment council. 4. VPAA approval. The department chair(s) provides a summary of the curriculum to the VPAA and demonstrates there are no additional costs to the institution in so packaging current courses. 5. The VPAA reports to the UPC that the proposal conforms to the definition of a Class B proposal. 6. The UPC votes on the proposal and reports to the Faculty Senate. c. Class C: A new major/minor/endorsement/certificate involving a consortial arrangement with or including content from/delivered by another institution(s) of higher learning. 1. Early in the process of preparing such a proposal, representatives of the department and the administration prepare a concept document of two to three pages that a. Sketches the contours of the proposal in rough form b. Documents the accreditation of the partner institution [e.g., when last renewed, for what term, any point of note significant to the program] and addresses potential concerns if the institution is not accredited by the Higher Learning Commission or its equivalent. c. Addresses consistency with and maintenance of institutional identity (e.g., Lutheran identity).  [Discussion on this point may serve a basis for the “Mission” section of the fuller proposal.] 2. Representatives of the department and the administration present the concept proposal to the UPC. The UPC may authorize further work on the proposal or request senate action. 3. Following authorization of the concept proposal, Class C proposals follow the steps for Class A proposals.

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6.21 INTRODUCTION OF A NEW COURSE
1. An instructor may, in consultation with the department, develop a new course. 2. The prospectus form (6.21 Form 1) must be completed and approved by the department. Upon approval, the department chair shall send the prospectus form to the dean of the college. The dean of the college shall determine whether the course and the prospectus are in harmony with faculty policy and institutional objectives and is authorized to delay the offering of the course if the prospectus is unacceptable. As necessary, the dean of the college shall consult with department chairs and the Undergraduate Policies Committee in order to resolve problems that may arise. In cases where institutional policy conflicts with the plans of a department, the Undergraduate Policies Committee may examine the problem and recommend policy changes. 3. Once the prospectus is approved, a syllabus must be generated by the instructor and approved by the department chair. 4. If the proposed course is suggested to fulfill a general education requirement, it must receive approval from the General Education Committee. 5. Course descriptions will be published in the catalog for those courses that are offered regularly and for which a syllabus has been approved.

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6.21 Form 1 NEW COURSE PROSPECTUS FORM
1. Full course title: 2. Subject code: ______ (e.g. MAT) Course level: ______ (e.g. 100 or 200) Proposed #: _____ (Consult the registrar’s office for available numbers in your subject code) 3. Semester credits: ________ 4. Prerequisite/Enrollment requirements: 5. Catalog description: 6. This course will be utilized as: A required course in the following programs: An elective course in the following programs: A general education course in the following area: (Subject to approval of the General Committee) 7. Rationale for course introduction at this time: 8. Resource requirements (staffing, equipment, facilities): 9. Student Learning Outcomes (objectives): 10. Principle learning activities (assessments): Type of instruction (Check all that apply) Traditional Online Hybrid Lab Terms Offered Fall Spring Summer Special Considerations Special course fee required $_____ Repeatable for ___ maximum credits, ___ times Replaces existing course number _______. This course will be dropped. Other: Signatures Submitted by: _____________________________________________________ (Proposer- please print) Date Approved by: _____________________________________________________ (Department Chair’s Signature) Date Approved by: _____________________________________________________ (Dean’s Signature) Date Copied to Vice President for Academic Affairs

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6.12 DEGREE DEFINITIONS
A. Credit: A semester credit is typically 35 hours of engaged time. B. BA Major: Normally 32 to 44 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study. C. BA Independently Designed Major: Normally 32 to 44 credits constituted by courses from a range of academic disciplines. D. BA General Studies Major: Constituted as the successful completion of 36 approved credits of which no more than three courses may be applied to the General Education requirement. E. BA Sans Major: Constituted as the successful completion of two minors in lieu of a traditional major. Only one of the minors may be independently designed. F. BS Major: Normally 45 to 60 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study. G. BS Independently Designed Major: Normally 45 to 60 credits constituted by courses from a range of academic disciplines. H. BBA degree: 52 credits in the business core and 20 to 24 credits in a specific business concentration. I. BFA Major: a professional degree in the fine arts, consisting of up to but not exceeding 80 credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study as recognized by relevant accrediting agencies. J. Emphasis: An intentional subset of a major consisting of 12 to 19 credits. K. Minor: 20 to 24 credits taken in one area or in related areas of study. L. Independently Designed Minor: 20 to 24 credits constituted by courses from a range of academic disciplines. M. Endorsement: An approved course of study that is added to an education major. N. General education: A part of the curriculum outside one’s major and/or minors that ensures an undergraduate education encompassing a broad range of topics, skills and values reflecting Concordia’s mission and purpose. O. Certificate: A set of courses of at least 12 credits that does not typically fulfill graduation requirements for a major, minor, or emphasis. P. Church certification: A course of study that leads to certification for commissioned ministries in The Lutheran Church– Missouri Synod. Q. Licensure Program: A course of study that leads to professional licensure. R. Prospectus: An abbreviated syllabus, a brief proposal for a newly developed course. S. Syllabus: A cognitive map or blueprint for a course. Among other things, it includes the learning goals for the course, the means by which the goals are to be achieved, and the assessment procedures for measuring student achievement. T. Term: Number of weeks as defined by federal financial aid regulations (15 weeks as of 2017).

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6.11 PRINCIPLES OF ACADEMIC CURRICULAR POLICY
A. The development of the curriculum is the responsibility of The Faculty. B. Faculty-approved curricular programs are described in the Academic Catalog of Concordia University, St. Paul. C. The Faculty, through its colleges, is responsible for establishing standards of student performance and evaluation procedures to insure achievement of standards for graduation requirements. New undergraduate programs are approved by the Undergraduate Policies Committee. Departments planning to offer a new undergraduate major, minor, or certificate are to follow guidelines suggested in 6.22. D. Normally, students who matriculate before a curricular revision is adopted may follow either the revised curriculum or the curriculum under which they matriculated. E. Instructors are to follow guidelines suggested in 6.21 for the preparation of course prospecti and course syllabi. The dean of the college and the chair of the department are each to receive a copy of the prospectus and the syllabus. It is the responsibility of the dean of the college to keep all college course prospecti and course syllabi current.

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Student Education: Internships, Grading, Credits, Registrar

7.33 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
A. To be eligible to register continuously without conditions, a student must achieve satisfactory academic progress. Concordia will follow federal-financial-aid policy on satisfactory academic progress as long as Concordia accepts federal funding. B. When a student does not maintain satisfactory progress, the University will impose certain restrictions that will affect the student’s eligibility for enrollment: 1. Academic Probation: Academic probation is a formal warning that students did not achieve satisfactory progress. A student on probation will remain eligible to enroll in the subsequent term for a maximum of 16 credits, but must achieve satisfactory progress at the end of that term or face disqualification. 2. Disqualification: Disqualification occurs when students do not meet satisfactory academic progress requirements for two consecutive terms. Students may appeal to be re-admitted by completing the Disqualification Appeal Form. 3. Additionally, for first year students with no prior college credits earned, first term of enrollment: To be eligible to return for a second term, a student must achieve at least a 1.0 GPA their first term. Disqualification occurs when first-term students do not achieve a 1.0 GPA. Students will be notified of their disqualification in writing by the registrar. Students are ineligible to register for subsequent terms. Students may appeal to be readmitted by completing the Disqualification Appeal Form.

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7.32 DEAN’S LIST AND ACADEMIC HONORS RECOGNITION
A. Full-time undergraduate students who earn a grade point average (GPA) of 3.60 and above in a given academic semester are included on the Dean’s List. To be considered, all incompletes must be removed by the end of the second week after exam week. B. The following criteria are used to determine eligibility for the Dean’s List: 1. Full-time students must earn a grade point average (GPA) of 3.60 or better in a particular academic semester; students with more than half of their credits on the P-N grading system must have a cumulative GPA of 3.60 or greater. 2. All incompletes must be removed by the end of the second week after the examination week. C. The Dean’s List is prepared by the Office of the Registrar at the end of the second week of each semester. Acknowledgments are sent to those students who appear on the list by the Vice President for Academic Affairs. D. Full-time students in bachelor degree programs in Concordia University, St. Paul who have earned at least 60 credits at Concordia and who have earned at a cumulative grade point average of 3.90 or higher are designated as graduating summa cum laude; those students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.75-3.89 are designated as graduating magna cum laude; those students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.60 to 3.74 are designated as graduating cum laude. Students in bachelor degree programs at Concordia University, St. Paul who have earned fewer than 60 credits and have at least a 3.90 GPA at Concordia will be recognized as graduating “with high distinction.” Students who have earned fewer than 60 credits and have a GPA between 3.75 and 3.89 will be recognized as graduating “with distinction.”

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7.31 PASS-NO PASS GRADING
A. In courses usually graded A-F 1. A course usually graded A-F may be taken P-N by a student if the course is an elective. A course is designated as elective when it is not used by a given student to meet any specific area or course requirement including the general education program, major, minor, or emphasis. To take a course usually graded A-F as a P-N course, a student must file the appropriate P-N form with the Office of the Registrar before the end of the seventh week of the term, or its equivalent for a half-semester course. 2. The “P” grade is equated to the normal “A” to “C-” grade range. P-N courses transferred in by students as required courses (a course is designated as required when it is used by a given students to meet any specific area or course requirement including the general education program, major, minor, or emphasis) are acceptable only from colleges where the grading system is the normal system as described above. 3. There is a four-credit limit of P-N courses per semester for sophomores, juniors and seniors. Other courses and internships (see below) which are graded by the P-N system do not count towards these limits. B. In courses only graded P-N 1. Field experiences such as internships and student teaching, and intercollegiate athletic activities are offered ONLY on a “Pass-No Pass” basis. 2. A student may earn a maximum of eight credits in the combined music/theatre area and one credit in each area of athletics that are applicable to the total credits for graduation requirements. The maximum credit limit applies to students who are not music/theatre majors, minors or emphases. 3. Although these courses apply toward graduation requirements, they are not calculated into the cumulative grade point average.

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7.301 IN-PROGRESS GRADE
A. In-Progress (“I”) grades may be given to students who have missed part of their assigned work due to circumstances beyond their control, but otherwise have done satisfactory work. Students who are unable to finish all the required coursework for a course may request an “I.”. B. Instructors must submit the In-Progress Grade Request by the grading deadline to the registrar’s office. It is the students’ responsibility to initiate an In-Progress Grade Request. However, instructors may deny an In-Progress Grade Request. C. Guidelines: 1. All course requirements to remove an In-Progress grade and in some cases to remove probationary or disqualification status must be completed within four weeks of the last day of class. 2. If students are unable to complete the work within four weeks, extensions may be requested from the instructor for a maximum of six months from the last day of the course. 3. If the work is not completed within the agreed upon time, the instructor will submit a grade, based on course grading procedures specified in the syllabus. 4. If a grade is not submitted to the Registrar by the agreed upon time, the recorded “I” will become an “F” or “N.”

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7.30 GRADING SYSTEM
A Superior 4.00 A- 3.67 B+ 3.33 B Above Average 3.00 B- 2.67 C+ 2.33 C Average 2.00 C- 1.67 D+ 1.33 D Below Average 1.00 D- 0.67 F 0.00 P Pass N No Pass X Continuing registration for more than one term V Audit W Withdrawal: Student officially withdrew from a course during the third through the eighth week of the semester. In Progress. This grade is given to students who have missed part of their assigned work due to circumstances beyond their control, but who otherwise are doing satisfactory work (See Policy 7.301). POLICY NUMBER: 7.30 POLICY NAME: Grading System DATE: Approved by the Undergraduate Policy Committee on March 9, 2005

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7.29 TRADITIONAL STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE DROP/WITHDRAW
A. Administrative Drop (Day 1 of semester through the last day to drop without record) If a student has not:  attended any registered courses  communicated with instructors or advisor  participated in the course(s) through attendance, discussion board postings, web-ex sessions and/or submitted any assignments or exams, that student will be dropped from all registration for the term and withdrawn from the university. This will be completed by the last day to drop a course(s) without record. Their Academic Advisor will attempt to contact the student via phone and email to inform him/her that this process has been initiated. The student will be given 48 hours to declare their intent to continue in the registered course(s). If by the last day to drop a courses there is no response from the student, the Academic Advisor will complete the University Withdrawal Form on behalf of the student indicating that the student never attended. B. Administrative Withdraw (After last day to drop without record through the last day to withdraw) If, after beginning and participating in classes, a student then stops:  attending class(es) for at least 10 or more consecutive days for 14 week classes and 7 or more consecutive days for 7 week classes  communicating with instructors or advisor  participating in the course(s) through attendance, discussion board postings, web-ex sessions and/or submitting any assignments or exams, the Academic Advisor will attempt to contact the student with a participation warning. The student will have 48 hours after final notice to declare their intent to continue or show engagement in the course(s). If there is no response from the student, the Academic Advisor will complete the University Withdrawal Form on behalf of the student to have them withdrawn from the course(s) indicating the last date of attendance (if available). The student will receive a grade of “W” for the course(s).

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7.28 AUDITING COURSES IN TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
A. Students who satisfy the requirements for admission may register to audit a course without receiving academic credit for the course. B. Auditing students need not meet regular course requirements but should confer with the instructor as to their privileges and responsibilities in the course. Upon completion of the course, a grade of “V” is recorded on the student’s permanent record. C. Students may find it helpful to audit a course to review materials for a more advanced course or to enrich an interest area. Auditors are excluded from laboratory and studio participation. D. Students may change regular registration to an audit before the end of the eighth week of the semester. Registration may be canceled for non-attendance.

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7.27 TRADITIONAL STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE DROP/WITHDRAW
A. Administrative Drop (Day 1 of semester through the last day to drop without record) If a student has not:  attended any registered courses  communicated with instructors or advisor  submitted any assignments, that student will be dropped from all registration for the term and withdrawn from the university. This will be completed by the last day to drop a traditional course without record. Their Academic Advisor will attempt to contact the student via phone and email to inform him/her that this process has been initiated. If by the last day to drop a traditional courses there is no response from the student, the Academic Advisor will complete the University Withdrawal Form on behalf of the student indicating that the student never attended. B. Administrative Withdraw (After last day to drop without record through the last day to withdraw) If, after beginning and participating in classes, a student then stops:  attending class(es) for at least two weeks  communicating with instructors or advisor  submitting any assignments, the Academic Advisor will attempt to contact the student with a participation warning. The student will have 48 hours after final notice to declare their intent to continue or show engagement in the course(s). If there is no response from the student, the Academic Advisor will complete the University Withdrawal Form on behalf of the student to have them withdrawn from the course(s) indicating the last date of attendance (if available). The student will receive a grade of “W” for the course(s).

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7.26 ADDING AND DROPPING/WITHDRAWING FROM COURSES IN TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
A. Definition of terms 1. Drop without record: No entry is recorded on the student’s permanent record. 2. Withdrawal (Drop with record): A “W” grade is entered on the student’s permanent record. A “W” grade does not affect a student’s grade point average but does count toward credits attempted and may impact the student’s satisfactory progress. Standards for satisfactory progress are defined in 7.33 Satisfactory Progress Policy and recorded in the academic catalog. 3. Courses: A “course” is defined as any credit-bearing traditional or web-based class, field experience, internship, or independent study in the traditional programs. 4. Effective dates: The date that the course addition or withdrawal is effective is the date that all required forms with all required signatures are received by the Registrar. B. Deadlines for adding a course 1. After classes have begun for fall and spring semester, students may add half-semester and full- semester coursed within the first five academic calendar days of the course (not including weekends and holidays). Internship and independent study courses may be added within the first ten days of the semester. 2. Students may add a course, internship, or independent study for a summer term through the end of the first days of class of that term. This includes submitting paperwork for an internship or independent study. C. Withdrawal dates and times 1. Dropping without record a. Full-semester courses: Students may drop without record within the first ten academic calendar days (not including weekends and holidays) of full-semester courses. b. Half-semester courses: Students may drop without record within the first five academic calendar days (not including weekends and holidays) of half-semester courses. c. Less than half-semester courses: Students may drop without record through the first one- seventh of the class meeting times. 2. Withdrawal (Drop with record) a. Full-semester courses: Students may withdraw from full-semester courses anytime from the eleventh class day (not including weekends and holidays but including class days when the particular course does not meet) through the fiftieth class day and receive a “W” grade. b. Half-semester courses: Students may withdraw from half-semester courses anytime from the sixth academic calendar day (not including weekends and holidays) through the twentieth- fifth class day and receive a “W” grade. c. Less than half-semester courses: Students may withdraw from less than half- semester courses and receive a “W” through the first five-sevenths of the class meeting times.

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7.25 COURSE REPETITION TO IMPROVE A GRADE
A. Students may repeat a course. However, the course required of all incoming first-year students cannot be dropped, withdrawn from, and/or retaken. B. If students repeat a course, only the higher/highest grade is used in computing cumulative grade point average (CGPA).

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7.24 COURSE SUBSTITUTIONS
A. The Registrar will evaluate new student transcripts and apply general education credits according to University policy. Students wishing to apply additional transfer courses to general education credits, other than those initially accepted by the Registrar, must petition an exception using the Course Substitution Request form. A syllabus for the transfer course must be included. This petition must be approved by the student’s advisor and the General Education Committee. The request will be retained in the student’s academic file. B. Students wishing to apply transfer courses to their major, minor, or emphasis must petition for approval using the Course Substitution Request form. A syllabus for the transfer course must be included. The petition must be approved by the student’s advisor and the chair of the department offering the major, minor, or emphasis. The request will be retained in the student’s academic file. C. Students wishing to substitute a different Concordia University course for one required by a current major, minor, or emphasis must petition for approval using the Course Substitution Request form. The petition must be approved by the student’s advisor and the chair of the department offering the major, minor, or emphasis. The request will be retained in the student’s academic file.

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7.23 COURSE PLACEMENT FOR GENERAL EDUCATION
Where placement is required for general education courses, the department with the content expertise is responsible for placement. Content areas in which placement may be required are writing, reading, foreign language, and mathematics.

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7.11 COMPLETING TWO BACCALAUREATE DEGREES
A. Students may complete two Baccalaureate degrees of different types (BS/BA, BS/BBA, BA/BBA, etc.). To do this, students must complete the general education requirements and the requirements of both baccalaureate degree programs. Students who complete the requirements for a major leading to a Bachelor of Arts and a major leading to a Bachelor of Science will be awarded both a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science degree if there are no more than 12 credits overlap of coursework between the majors. B. Students who have previously completed a baccalaureate degree may complete a second baccalaureate degree of the same type, for example BA/BA if they meet  the following criteria: complete the theology general education requirement; complete 32 credits in residence; and complete 50% of the major at Concordia. C. Students completing two majors concurrently in the same degree type will earn one degree with two majors, for example BA with majors in English and Art.

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7.05 ADMISSION POLICY FOR UNDERGRADUATE TRADITIONAL STUDENTS
I. Freshmen and freshmen transfers with less than 20 semester credits. A. Requirements 1. An application 2. Official High School Transcripts 3. ACT Score Report 4. Admission criteria a. Fiftieth (50th) percentile rank or higher from an accredited high school or an equivalent e.g. General Education Development Test (GED) b. ACT composite score of 19, and no sub-score below the 20th percentile c. High school grade point average of 2.00 or higher, and college cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher (if applicable) B. Procedural guidelines for new freshmen and freshmen transfer applicants who do not meet the university’s admission criteria and who will be referred to the Admission Committee. 1. An official ACT profile ACT composite score of no less than 13, sub-scores in English, math, and reading above the 16th percentile and scaled scores above the 6th percentile in English Usage/Mechanics, Rhetoric Skills, Pre-Algebra/Elementary Algebra, Algebra/ Coordinate Geometry, Social Studies/Science, and Art/Literature 2. Acceptable credits equivalent of “C” or better in these types and numbers of courses on a high school transcript or an equivalent, such as GED English 4 Years Math (Algebra, Geometry) 2 Years Science (Biology and either Chemistry or Physics) 2 Years History/Social Science 2 Years Fine Arts 2 Years Health/Physical Education 1 Year 3. Two satisfactory letters of recommendation: one from a high school official, preferably a guidance counselor or another source if graduated from high school more than two years ago, and one from a reliable reference (employer, clergy person, etc.). 4. A writing sample a. Applicants with a composite ACT score lower than 19 are required to provide a writing sample. b. Writers must demonstrate fair writing ability (64-74) on “Interpretive Guide for College and University Placement,” as cited in Testing ESL Composition: A Practical Approach by Jacobs et al. II. For transfer and post-baccalaureate applicants with 20 or more semester credits A. Requirements 1. An application 2. Admission criteria a. Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 from previous accredited college(s) b. If an applicant fails to meet the CGPA criterion, admission criteria for freshmen will be used i. Fiftieth (50th) percentile rank or higher from an accredited high school or an equivalent, e.g. General Education Development Test (GED) ii. ACT composite score of 19, and no sub-score below the 20th percentile iii. High school grade point average of 2.00 or higher B. Procedural guidelines for transfer applicants with 20 or more semester credits who do not meet admission criteria and who will be referred to the admission committee. 1. Acceptable credits of “C” or better in these types of courses on college transcripts: English Math (Algebra, Geometry) Science (Biological and Physical) History/Social Science Fine Arts Health/Physical Education 2. High school transcript with “C” or better in above mentioned courses 3. Two satisfactory letters of recommendation: one from the dean of students of the last institution attended and one from a reliable reference. 4. Personal Essay; 1-2 typed pages addressing the following prompt: Explain why you feel you will be a successful student at Concordia and address the steps you will take to ensure success. Please comment specifically on any of the following areas that may apply to your situation: Academic record, standardized test preparation and performance, gaps in educational career, personal experiences III. International Students A. Additional Requirements 1. International applicants with less than 20 semester credits must have one of the following: TOEFL score of at least 500 on the paper-based test TOEFL score of at least 173 on the computer-based test Michigan test score of 70 Completed level 109 from the English Language Services (ELS) 2. International transfer applicants without an ACT must have one of the following: CGPA of 2.0 from a U.S. college TOEFL score of 500 on the paper-based test TOEFL score of 173 on the computer-based test Michigan test score of 70 Completed level 109 from the English Language Services (ELS) 3. International students must also submit the Certification of Finances Form B. Procedural Guidelines 1. All international applications will be reviewed by the Director of English for Speakers of other Languages (ESOL). 2. Applicants who do not meet the institution’s admission criteria and additional requirements will be referred to the Admission Committee. IV. Admission Committee A. Membership and Structure 1. The Admission Committee for Traditional Undergraduate applicants shall be composed of these voting members who will accept or reject applicants: a. Associate Vice President for Traditional Enrollment Management, chair b. Two approved full-time teaching faculty members, appointed by the Associate Vice President for Traditional Enrollment Management c. Director of Student Success, or designee d. Assistant Director of Academic Advising, or designee 2. These nonvoting advisory committee members will be invited to attend meetings when student issues related to particular professional expertise is needed. The input of these professionals will be strongly considered by the committee: a. Director of Undergraduate Admission b. International Student Academic Advisor c. Director of Student Accessibility Services B. Roles and responsibilities: 1. The committee will decide approval or denial of all applicants who do not meet admission criteria. 2. The committee will admit applicants who demonstrate college potential. 3. The committee will actively support programs to ensure that students who are referred to the Admission Committee persist and succeed at Concordia University. 4. The committee will monitor relevant data concerning admitted students for the purpose of assessment of criteria met, retention, and subsequent success. 5. The committee will annually review and submit to the Faculty Senate, through the Undergraduate Policy Committee (UPC), any changes in admission policies, procedures, standards and guidelines their experience and expertise determine necessary.

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6.701 MID-TERM GRADES FOR STUDENTS IN TRADITIONAL PROGRAMS
A. In addition to a final course grade, course instructors will enter a mid-term grade for full-semester courses through the online grading system. B. Mid-term grades will not become part of the student’s official transcript. The purpose of the mid-term grade is to provide students with consistent feedback across all courses for use in advising and academic support. C. The submission deadline will be included in the Academic Calendar.

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6.70 CLASS ROSTERS AND GRADING
A. Instructors are responsible for managing their course enrollment(s). B. All students registered for the course are expected to be in class attendance. If a student on the roster has never attended, the appropriate office must be notified by the end of the first week of the instructional period. C. For any student who has attended at least once, each instructor is responsible for taking attendance, establishing the last date of attendance if a student discontinues, and for reporting excessive absences to the Director of Advising. D. The current official course enrollment is available online. All changes are updated online. Students are able to make changes to their schedule online according to the posted drop, add, and withdrawal dates. E. Grades are entered online by the instructor. Only students on the official roster may receive grades. 1. Each student on the final course roster should receive a grade. 2. A “W” grade may only be entered by the registrar. 3. The P-N grade should be given only when the student has so registered, when the instructor has been so notified by the registrar, or for internships, student teaching, and courses identified as P/N courses. 4. An “I” grade may only be entered by the registrar upon receipt of the Request for an In-Progress Grade. (See Policy 7.301 for more information on In-Progress Grades.) 5. When entering a grade of “F”, the last date of attendance must be entered. F. The deadline for entering grades online will be announced by the Office of the Registrar. G. The registrar is responsible for posting grades in a timely manner. H. Grades (A, B, C, D, F, P/N) given in a specific course may not be changed after they have been reported to the Office of the Registrar by the instructor unless it is found that an error has been made in calculation or in recording. Grades earned in a course may not be changed due to work submitted in a later term. Errors in recording or miscalculation must be changed no later than the end of the semester following the error. Academic integrity violations have no time limitations. Grade changes must have accompanying documentation and be approved by the faculty member, the Department Chair and the Dean of the College. I. Students who wish to appeal final course grades must do so within 90 days from the date the grade is posted by the registrar.

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6.64 CONTINUING EDUCATION UNITS
Concordia University grants permission for its faculty to distribute continuing education units in areas in which they are highly qualified. If such continuing education units are offered under the umbrella of the University, the faculty must obtain prior authorization from a college dean as well as the accrediting or licensing institution.

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6.63 TRANSFER CREDIT: THE GRANTING OF CREDIT FOR NON-CONCORDIA WORK
A. Definition: Credit refers to transcript recognition of work toward a degree. B. Responsibility: The registrar is responsible for evaluating all requests for credit and may seek assistance in this evaluation. C. Basic Principles and Guidelines: 1. All credit granted must be for educational activities that conform to the University’s mission, curricula, and standards for student achievement. 2. Credit transferred from other educational institutions will be considered in the light of a. the educational quality of the institution from which the student transfers; b. the comparability of the nature, content, and level of credit earned to that offered at Concordia; and c. the appropriateness and applicability of the credit earned to the programs offered by Concordia in the light of the student’s educational goals. 3. Experiences offered for extra-institutional credit must be articulated, documented, and measured in terms of the student’s program of study and the university’s graduation requirements. 4. The score on tests of educational activities submitted for credit must meet the standards of Concordia. (Guidelines are available from the Office of the Registrar.) 5. Credits for non-Concordia work may be appropriate and accepted but may not be applicable because they exceed the credit requirements for graduation at Concordia or are not applicable to any category of Concordia’s requirements. 6. Credit for non-Concordia work is accepted up to a maximum of 90 credits allowing for the 30 credit residency requirement necessary to earn a degree at Concordia. 7. Transfer students who have completed the Minnesota transfer curriculum or an associate of arts degree from an accredited institution are considered to have met Concordia’s general education requirements with the exception of the theology requirement which must be completed at Concordia. 8. Credits earned as part of a study abroad experience at a foreign institution approved through the CALL Center will be entered as “Pass” grades and do not count in GPA calculation. Students must earn a “C-” or higher to earn credit. Grades earned in Concordia University courses taught abroad will be figured into the student’s GPA. D. Standards: The principles and guidelines set forth by the following organizations are followed. These principles and guidelines are modified where appropriate to coincide with Concordia’s principles, specifications, and guidelines as noted elsewhere in this policy. Higher Learning Commission (HLC) Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) Council on Advancement of Experiential Learning (CAEL) National College Credit Recommendation Service (NCCRS) National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) American Council on Education (ACE) E. Sources of Credit: Credit or exemption from program requirements may be earned through work at accredited institutions, non-accredited institutions, other coursework or training of substance, life experiences, and tests and pre-college work. 1. Regionally Accredited Institutions or Nationally Accredited Institutions recognized by CHEA (Council for Higher Education Accreditation) : The registrar evaluates credit as to its comparability and appropriateness as noted in the principles set forth above and may consult the appropriate department if the appropriateness and comparability of the credit are doubtful. 2. Non-accredited Institutions (not accredited by one of the above agencies) or other coursework or training of substance: Credit is awarded on a reduced scale of completed terms or hours with 60 clock hours as the minimum for one credit or 16 credits for one academic year of full-time attendance. A cap of 30 semester credits is established for this type of coursework. ACE evaluated credit is also included in this area. 3. Life Experiences: A form requesting credit for stated purposes is filed by the student. Credit may then be granted following an assessment of the student’s portfolio by a qualified Concordia instructor, a qualified instructor from another institution, written examination by a Concordia instructor or department or an examination prepared by CAEL or a similar organization, faculty committee assessment, personal interview, or competency demonstration. A fee is assessed for transcripting this type of credit. 4. Tests and Pre-College Work: Credit may be granted for satisfactory performance (See C. 4 above) in experiences of the following types. a. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) b. DANTES, the military version of CLEP c. Advanced Placement programs of secondary schools (AP) d. Local examinations or verification-of competence e. International Baccalaureate Program (IB) F. Evaluation Responsibilities and Curriculum Applications Credit may be applied to one of the following curriculum requirements. 1. General Education Curriculum: The primary responsibility for evaluation rests with the registrar who shall consult the General Education Committee if the appropriateness and comparability of the credit is doubtful. Transfer credits in the general education area are entered as a “Pass” grade and do not count in GPA calculation. 2. Majors, minors, emphases, certificate, and program courses: The appropriateness and comparability of credit in these areas shall be assessed by the appropriate department or instructor and approved by the department and the student’s academic adviser on a Course Substitution Request form. Transfer credits in the major are entered as a letter grade and will count in GPA calculation, with the exception of approved study abroad coursework. Study abroad coursework that has been approved for a major or minor will be entered as “Pass” with an earned grade of “C-” or higher and will not count in GPA calculation. 3. Electives: The appropriateness and comparability of credits in this area shall be assessed by the registrar. Transfer credits in the elective area are entered as a “Pass” grade and do not count in GPA calculation.

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6.62 INDEPENDENT STUDY
A. Definition: An independent study is an educational experience offered for credit outside the regularly scheduled classes. Instructors are responsible for the academic soundness of the independent study proposal and its implementation. The dean of each college in consultation with the registrar may designate low enrollment courses as independent studies. B. Criteria: 1. Eligibility for independent study is limited to students in good standing. 2. Acceptable criteria for approval to register for independent study shall be to schedule conflicts of existing courses, advanced study, or enrichment. Existing courses may be taken only if there are insurmountable schedule problems which might delay a student’s graduation. 3. For existing courses, the approved course syllabus shall be followed. For instructor/student- designed courses, objectives, learning experiences, expectations, and evaluation methods shall be written. 4. The independent study may be planned to extend up to one year of continuous registration. 5. Each credit hour represents approximately 35 clock hours of student work, including meetings with the instructor. 6. Students are normally limited to four semester hours of independent study per semester. A maximum of sixteen hours may apply towards graduation requirements. 7. Registration for independent study shall normally occur when students register for their next semester’s classes. Completed forms are due no later than the end of the second week of classes in the term. 8. Independent studies should be identified for registration by the departmental prefix followed by 488. C. Administration 1. A number of 488 prefixed by course letters (i.e., HIS-488, ENG 488, etc.) shall be used to designate independent study courses unless a standard course number already exists. 2. The dean of each college is responsible for interpreting the independent study policy and approving any exceptions. 3. The dean of each college is responsible for assigning service load credit to independent studies. 4. Ordinarily, each student shall be equated on the workload as follows: 1 course credit = .1 faculty load credit 2 course credits = .2 faculty load credit 3 course credits = .3 faculty load credit 4 course credits = .4 faculty load credit 5 course credits = .5 faculty load credit 6 course credits = .6 faculty load credit

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6.60 STUDENT INTERNSHIP CREDIT POLICY
1) Definitions: a) An internship is a planned and supervised field-based educational experience for which a student receives academic credit. b) A University Supervisor is a Concordia University, St. Paul faculty member assigned by the academic department to supervise a given internship. c) An On-Site Supervisor is a member of the internship organization who supervises the student intern and completes required evaluation forms of the student intern. 2) Academic Credit: a) For each internship credit, the student is required to document 35 hours of work for the internship. b) The number of credits earned is determined by the academic department, faculty adviser, and the student intern. c) No more than one-third of a major or minor may consist of internship credits. No more than 12 internship credits may be applied toward the minimum credits required for a Bachelor’s degree unless students are completing two or more majors or a major and a minor, not to exceed 18 credits total. d) Grades are assigned by the University Supervisor after evaluation forms and other required work are completed, within the grading deadlines set for that term. Extensions for incomplete work must be approved following the In Progress Grade policy. e) Internships are graded on a Pass/No-Pass basis. 3) Academic departments or faculty are responsible for: a) Approving internship experiences. b) Providing a University Supervisor to evaluate and grade the student intern’s performance. c) Collecting the student intern’s internship location and On-Site Supervisor contact information. d) Regular contact with on-site supervisor in accordance with the requirements of the internship. e) Setting appropriate standards for student intern preparation and performance. f) Requiring a mid-term and final evaluation to be completed by the On-Site Supervisor and submitted to the University Supervisor.

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7.81 DECLARING A MAJOR AND APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION
A. Students must declare a major or two minors upon completing 45 credits. Students may declare a major or two minors at any time prior to 45 credits. B. Students must apply for graduation in accordance with the procedures set by the Registrar.

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7.50 BRINGING CHILDREN TO CLASS
The practice of bringing children to class is discouraged due primarily to the impact of such on the learning environment. Children may not attend class without prior approval by the instructor.

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7.41 STUDENT IN GOOD STANDING
A student in good standing is one who: A. is registered for the current term, B. is attending class in accordance with Concordia’s class attendance policy, C. is not delinquent in meeting financial obligations to the University, D. is not on disciplinary probation, and E. is not on academic (financial aid) probation.

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7.40 CLASS ATTENDANCE POLICY
A. Students are expected to attend all class meetings and laboratory sessions for the courses in which they are enrolled. B. Excessive absences as determined by the instructor and written in the course syllabus may result in disqualification or failure. C. Instructors must include policies for handling absences and make-up work in the syllabus. Instructors may not penalize students who are required to be absent from class because of official university activities. Examples of such activities are intercollegiate athletics, university music tours, theater productions, and so forth. In addition, instructors may not penalize students who are required to be absent from class because of mandatory military training of up to two weeks per semester that cannot be deferred. Students, however, are responsible for informing the instructor in advance of the impending absence (according to a timetable determined by the instructor) and for making up any missed work at a time determined by the instructor. Instructors have the right to contact the appropriate person to determine the legitimacy of the intended absence. D. Instructors planning field trips or any other official university activities must secure the appropriate approvals as outlined in Faculty Handbook Policy 6.65. E. Instructors must be able to determine the student’s last day of attendance.

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7.36 OFFICIAL COMMUNICATION BY EMAIL
Concordia University communicates electronically to its students through the University’s email system. Students are expected to read all official communications sent by the University to their csp.edu address, and respond appropriately.

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7.35 ACADEMIC RECORDS, TRANSCRIPTS AND CREDENTIALS
A. A permanent record or file of academic information is maintained in the Office of the Registrar. The registrar is responsible for the maintenance of complete and accurate records. B. Faculty members may use academic record files from the registrar for proper academic purposes as defined in FERPA regulations. C. Official transcripts are issued only with signed consent of the student and are sent directly to the designee they request. The official transcript carries the signature of the registrar and bears the seal of Concordia University. D. Students, in good standing, may have access to an unofficial copy of their transcript. E. LCT/DPM/DCO/DCE candidates request credentials from the Department of Theology and Ministry. F. Credentials are defined as various references and records (evaluations/recommendations), usually with a transcript of credits.

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7.34 ELIGIBILITY POLICIES FOR ATHLETICS
A. The University is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and agrees to abide by its rules and policies. Eligibility rules and regulations governing students’ participation in intercollegiate athletics are available through the Office of the Athletic Director. B. The Director of Compliance, assisted by the Faculty Athlete Representative, is charged with the responsibility of ensuring that all participants in intercollegiate competition are eligible in accordance with the rule and regulations of the NCAA prior to their representing the institution in any manner.

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Faculty Academic Policies

7.10 GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
A. To graduate from Concordia University, students must meet the requirements listed in the university catalog for the year of entrance or as modified at a later date if it is to their advantage. B. Transfer students must meet modified course requirements within the total number of credits required in each area of the curriculum, as evaluated by the registrar. If a student transfers to Concordia with an associate of arts degree from an accredited institution or has met the state general education requirements all general education requirements will be satisfied with the exception of the theology requirement. C. Students confronted with options in majors in transition are permitted to take the option most favorable to meet their needs and requirements. D. A student may declare more than one major, minor, or emphasis if any two specialties have a commonality of a maximum of three courses, or one-fourth of the total credits, whichever is higher except in the case of multiple teaching licensure.] E. A student must earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or above. Additionally, a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 is required in all majors and minors. Some programs require a higher grade point average. If the minimum cumulative grade point average is not attained in a minor, the minor will not be listed on the transcript. Students should refer to the academic catalog for further information.

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6.991 HONORS NOMINATION FORM
Concordia University awards a small number of honorary degrees and awards each year at Commencement. Past awards have included Doctor of Humane Letters, Doctor of Laws, Doctor of Letters, and the Aeterna Moliri Award. Please consult Faculty Policy 6.99 Honorary Awards for specifics about the honorary award process and criteria. Nominated Honor: __________________________________________________________________________________ NAME OF PROPOSED HONOREE: ADDRESS: CURRENT POSITION: PAST POSITIONS (If possible, please attach a brief biography or other supporting documentation): PREVIOUS HONORS: REASON FOR NOMINATION: Please explain in detail why you are nominating this individual for an honorary award. POTENTIAL SOURCE OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Name of Nominator(s): Date:

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6.99 HONORARY AWARDS
A. The Faculty of Concordia University through the proceedings of the Faculty Senate may identify and approve candidates for honorary doctorates and awards. Members of the faculty and the administration are encouraged to identify and nominate potential candidates, using the “Honors Nomination Form” (Faculty Handbook 6.991), throughout the year. B. The Honorary Awards Committee, a standing committee of the Faculty Senate, will administer the selection process. C. Nominations and final selection shall be guided by the following criteria: Candidates, depending upon their nominated honor, shall have been effective and exemplary ● in fostering objectives compatible with the mission of this University ● in utilizing a professional and/or scholarly approach ● in exercising leadership ● in being of service to many individuals D. Doctoral degrees may be granted in the following areas: ● Doctor of Letters – Individuals who have been active as pastors, educators, artists, writers, etc. ● Doctor of Humane Letters – Individuals who have been active in philanthropy, community service, and lay leadership (church, civic), etc. ● Doctor of Laws – Individuals who have been active in government, business, etc. E. The Aeterna Moliri award may be granted to individuals who have “built for eternity,” being especially effective in the spread of the Gospel and extending the work of the church. These individuals may already have an earned or honorary doctorate. F. Final approval of the candidates shall be made by the Faculty Senate in accordance with the Bylaws.

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6.98 ACADEMIC ADVISING
In view of the benefit of faculty insight into curricular matters, tenure-track faculty will be involved in the academic advising of students. Particular involvement shall  be determined by deans, department chairpersons and advising professionals in a way that serves students well and is equitable to faculty.

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6.95 FACULTY AVAILABILITY AND RESPONSIVENESS
Faculty know their teaching schedules and other duties best and are responsible for setting and then communicating their availability and responsiveness standards accurately, clearly, by appropriate means, and in a timely manner. Including standards in course syllabi and/or on course management systems is expected. Faculty who assume administrative workload as a portion of total workload should also apportion to those duties priority in relation to the proportion of workload allocated by the university but keeping their faculty responsibilities of teaching, research, and service to church and community as a top priority. [Rationale for changes (Not part of policy) Faculty availability and responsiveness is a key to student success and satisfaction. Over time, there have been advances in electronic means of communication that have altered student and faculty opportunities and preferences for communication. Email, voicemail, electronic course management systems, and online calendars are regularly used and other new forms of electronic communication including social media are becoming more common. New accreditation and governmental standards for student learning have been implemented that update the old notion of seat time for students and standard office hours for faculty. The goal is for faculty to be reasonably available and reasonably responsive to the needs of students at the university. It is understood that with the wide variety of students, programs, and delivery methods, individual faculty standards will vary by what courses are being taught, what format they use, and what student needs are being served. Administrators and staff should be respectful of faculty teaching loads when planning meetings and other university work. ]

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6.92 DETERMINING QUALIFICAITIONS FOR FACULTY TEACHING CREDIT-BEARING COURSES
Determining Qualifications for Faculty Teaching Credit-Bearing Courses Concordia University, St. Paul, seeking to ensure high quality instruction and stay in compliance with its accrediting bodies, will employ qualified faculty to teach credit-bearing courses. The University places primary importance on academic credentials awarded from accredited institutions. In addition to academic credentials, other competencies may be identified, as appropriate, when establishing qualifications. Faculty qualifications will be linked to the course(s) a faculty member is assigned to teach and will be initially determined by the department. Approval of faculty qualifications must be made by the College Dean and the Vice President of Academic Affairs (VPAA). The criteria for qualifications are outlined in this policy. Undergraduate Faculty Roles and Qualifications Qualified faculty members are identified primarily by credentials, but other factors, including but not limited to equivalent experience, may be considered in determining whether a faculty member is qualified. Using Credentials as a Basis for Determining Minimally Qualified Faculty Expectations for faculty credentials include the following:  Faculty should have completed a program of study in the discipline or subfield (as applicable) in which they teach, and/or for which they develop curricula, with coursework at least one level above that of the courses being taught or developed.  Faculty teaching in undergraduate programs should hold a degree at least one level above that of the program in which they are teaching. If a faculty member holds a master’s degree or higher in a discipline other than that in which he or she is teaching, that faculty member should have completed a minimum of 18 graduate credit hours in the discipline in which he or she is teaching.  If an individual faculty member has not achieved 18 graduate credit hours in the discipline in which he or she teaches, the institution may use experience as a basis for justifying its decision to assign the individual to the courses taught. See the following subsection for how experience may be considered in determining faculty qualifications. Using Tested Experience as a Basis for Determining Minimally Qualified Faculty Tested experience may substitute for an earned credential or portions thereof. This experience must be tested experience in that it includes a breadth and depth of experience outside of the classroom in real- world situations relevant to the discipline in which the faculty member would be teaching. Expectations for using tested experience as a basis for determining minimally qualified faculty include the following: Discipline Specific Qualifying experience must be relevant to the discipline in which the faculty member would be teaching. Minimum Thresholds The minimum threshold of qualifying tested experience is five years (10,000 hours) of experience outside of the classroom in real-world situations relevant to the discipline in which the faculty member would be teaching. Qualifying tested experience may also include skill sets, types of certifications or additional credentials, and experiences. Specific qualifications for each department are adopted and approved through the faculty governance process (See Procedures). Evaluation and Approval The faculty hiring qualifications related to tested experience are reviewed and approved through the faculty governance process. (See Procedures). Determining Minimally Qualified Faculty in the Context of Dual Credit Faculty members teaching dual credit courses must hold the same minimal qualifications as other Concordia University, St. Paul faculty (see above). Procedures Determining Credentialing Degrees Each department will determine the appropriate credentialing (masters and/or terminal), as defined above, for the courses within its department. Written justification for this determination must be provided to the College Dean. The College Dean will approve the credentialing degrees and forward to the VPAA. The VPAA will provide a final review and approval of the credentialing degree designations. The list of credentialing degrees will be reviewed every three years by the Office of Academic Affairs and updated as appropriate. Initial Determination of Qualifications 1. The Office of Human Resources will provide the appropriate forms and processes to implement this policy. 2. Prior to hiring, the department must ensure that potential faculty, regardless of full-time or part-time status, meet or exceed the criteria outlined in this policy. 3. The Department Chair/Unit Head will provide to the College Dean all relevant materials regarding qualifications. In situations where the basis for qualification is nonstandard, the Department Chair/Unit Head will provide a letter of justification providing specific details in support of that justification as well as a list of courses the faculty member is qualified to teach. 4. The Dean, after evaluating the materials and providing an approval recommendation, will submit all relevant materials to the Office of Human Resources for approval by the VPAA. 5. The VPAA will evaluate the materials and provide a decision regarding the hiring of the faculty member to teach. Ongoing Determination of Qualifications 1. The Office of Academic Affairs, through the College Deans, is responsible for ensuring ongoing compliance with this policy and with the University’s accrediting agencies. The College Deans will conduct review of at least 1/3 of the teaching faculty every year. The annual review will be submitted to the VPAA for review. 2. The deans of each college will notify the appropriate Department Chairs/Unit Heads of any faculty member who appears to be out of compliance with qualification guidelines. 3. Department Chairs/Unit Heads, once notified, must provide a letter of justification and any supporting documentation. The letter of justification will provide a sound argument for qualifications and will provide specific details and documentation in support of that justification. 4. The College Dean will review all letters of justification and supporting materials and will make a recommendation to the VPAA. The VPAA will make a determination on the faculty member’s qualifications to teach. 5. The College Dean, the Department Chair/Unit Head, will be notified in writing of all decisions. Maintaining Faculty Files An official file on each member of the faculty must be maintained by the appropriate dean’s office. The faculty file will include up-to-date information describing the qualifications of the faculty member (i.e. test experience documentation, copies of certificates, licenses, etc). The Office of Human Resources maintains an employment file that includes faculty transcripts. Updated Curriculum Vitas (CVs) will be submitted to the Department Chair/Unit Head and to the College Dean each academic year. College Deans will annually submit updated CVs to the Office of Academic Affairs. This policy is informed and utilizes language from the following Higher Learning Commission (HLC) policy document: Determining Qualified Faculty through HLC’s Criteria for Accreditation and Assumed Practices – March 2016

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6.90 FACULTY ABSENCES
A. Instructors are expected to meet their classes in adherence with the university schedule. The instructor is responsible for planning classes missed in advance of the absence. All such absences and the appropriate accommodations must be reported to the chair of the department in advance. B. In case of an unexpected absence (e.g. illness, death in the family, traffic accident) that would cause the faculty member to miss class, the department chair and students should be notified promptly and given alternative accommodations as soon as possible. C. If the faculty member will no longer teach the course, the dean of the college in consultation with the department chair will make decisions regarding the teaching of classes and other instructor responsibilities.

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6.88 INSTITUTIONAL POLICY ON INCLUSIVE LANGUAGE
A. Concordia University’s mission statement commits the institution to preparing students “for dedicated service to God and humanity.” In keeping with this mission, Concordia encourages communication that shows respect for all individuals. Therefore, all members of the university community will avoid language and illustrations that reinforce discriminatory attitudes or misleading stereotypes about people. Every official university communication, whether written or oral, shall use inclusive language. B. All supervisory personnel will be responsible for assuring that this policy is followed.

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6.87 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS
A. Definition of Terms 1. Academic integrity is essential to any academic institution and is in keeping with the mission of Concordia University. In order to protect the rights of students, the disciplinary procedure for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty follows these broad guidelines. Violations of academic integrity include “cheating” and “plagiarism” as defined by the university’s Student Code of Conduct (SCC). 2. The term “cheating” includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; (2) dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; or (3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the University faculty or staff (4) academic deception (e.g. fabricating data, misrepresenting sources, misleading presentations, lying) in written or oral form. 3. The term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials. B. Implementation of Academic Integrity Policies 1. The instructor will gather and document all evidence of academic dishonesty in a clear and concise manner. 2. The instructor will present this evidence to the student. 3. The instructor may prescribe academic penalties, including but not restricted to, the requirement of additional work, an assignment of a failing grade on the work in question, or failing grade for the entire course. Any prescribed penalties must be in writing. 4. The instructor will file an electronic Report of Classroom Incident Form (found on the University Portal.) This file will be shared with the Vice President for Academic Affairs’ Office. The VPAA will forward the incident form to the Dean of the college responsible for the class in which the incident occurred. The Dean will notify the student via email of the charge(s), decision, and appeal process. 5. If this is a repeated occurrence, the Department Chair, Dean of the College and the Vice President for Academic Affairs may impose additional penalties, including but not limited to dismissal from the departmental program, suspension from the university, or expulsion from the university. 6. A student has the right to appeal the charge and/or academic penalties imposed by the instructor by filing an appeal with the Dean of the college within three university business days 7. The Dean of the college reviews the form and determines if the appeal should be approved or denied. The Dean will make the decision based on information provided in the appeal; the incident is not reheard. The Dean will email the student and the reporting faculty member with a decision of the appeal and will also include information on the final appeals process to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. This response regarding the appeal is normally received within ten university business days. 8. A student has the right to a final appeal by emailing the Vice President for Academic Affairs with reasons for appeal within three university business days from the notification send date of the Dean’s appeal decision. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will make the final decision and notify the student via email along with the reporting faculty member and Dean. No further appeals will be heard.

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6.80 TRADITIONAL UNDERGRADUATE CALENDAR CHANGE POLICY
A. Annual Academic Calendar (with no major change in format) 1. The Undergraduate Policies Committee (UPC) develops the traditional undergraduate academic calendar, following standards set by faculty as to required number of class days for each term. 2. The Vice President for Academic Affairs responds to proposals from the UPC. Other offices may be asked to review the calendar as necessary. 3. After approval from the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the UPC approves the Academic Calendar. 4. After approval, the Office of the Registrar publishes the calendar in the University catalog and on the website. B. Annual Academic Calendar (with major changes such as interim) 1. The Vice President for Academic Affairs, or his/her appointed study group, proposes a new academic calendar to the Undergraduate Policies Committee (UPC) or the UPC proposes a new academic calendar to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. 2. UPC will seek input from other offices on campus affected by a major change to the calendar. 3. After approval from the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the UPC approves the Academic Calendar. 4. After approval, the Office of the Registrar publishes the calendar in the catalog and on the website. C. Calendar Scheduling Guidelines 1. As a regular scheduling pattern, classes will be in session on the Monday and Tuesday of Thanksgiving week. 2. As a regular scheduling pattern, the fall mid-semester break will be two days (four days if counting the adjacent weekend). As a regular scheduling pattern, the fall mid-semester break should not be scheduled to coincide with the Minnesota Education Association meeting (MEA weekend) due to student recruitment efforts. 3. As a regular scheduling pattern, final exam week will include exams Monday through Thursday. 4. In the event that the last day of finals falls on Dec 21st or after, and in an effort to ensure enough break time prior to Christmas, UPC may consider taking Thursday away from Fall Break, adding Monday of finals week as a class day, and having finals occur Tuesday – Friday. (Both of these models satisfy the preference of a minimum of 14 full weeks of class.)

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6.77 CLASS SIZE
A. Class size limits must have the approval of the dean of the college and the registrar, who meet in consultation with the Vice President for Academic Affairs. B. Classes with insufficient enrollment may be canceled by the dean of the college, in consultation with the registrar and the department chair.

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6.76 SCHEDULE OF CLASSES
A. The preparation of the schedule of classes is the responsibility of the registrar who consults with the deans of the colleges and department chairs. B. Individual faculty members may submit specific requests for course teaching time through their department chair and dean of the college. Such requests must be approved by the department chair and meet the needs of the overall class scheduling process. C. Faculty must abide by the delivery format (e.g. online, blended, face to face) and the time slot of the scheduled course.

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6.73 ADOPTION OF TEXTBOOKS AND OTHER CURRICULAR MATERIALS
A. The instructor of the course is responsible for selecting textbooks and other curricular materials. The instructor is to inform the bookstore of the selection by the date announced by the bookstore. B. Textbooks used by part-time instructors are normally selected by the regular full-time faculty in the department teaching the course. The chair of the department shall approve textbooks selected by part-time instructors.

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6.72 COURSE AND INSTRUCTOR FEEDBACK
A. Toward the conclusion of each undergraduate course, an online feedback tool will be utilized to collect student course and instructor feedback. The University will administer the process of distributing and reporting. B. Course feedback will be used for instructional improvement, curriculum development and improvement, as well as in contract renewal, peer review for advancement and tenure deliberations.

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6.71 FINAL EXAMINATIONS
A. The final examinations schedule is determined and posted online by the registrar. B. All courses are expected to have a final exam or an equivalent experience and meet during the scheduled final exam period. C. Private music instruction examinations may be scheduled on the last day of classes of the semester or at an optional time during final examination days at the discretion of the instructor based on student schedules and with the approval of the department chair. D. Co-curricular groups are not to leave on pre-scheduled tours until after the last period on the last day of final examinations unless no group member has a final examination during the third period on the last day of final examination days. Requests for change in rare cases must be made in writing and approved by the department chair, dean of the college, and the Vice President for Academic Affairs at the time the original tour plans are in process. E. If a student has more than two final exams scheduled on the same day, the student may seek relief through procedures established by the office of the registrar.

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6.65 OFFICIAL OFF-CAMPUS ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
A. When official off-campus academic activities conflict with other classes, arrangements must be made by the instructor with the approval of the department chair and dean of the college. The activities should be planned in advance and indicated on the course syllabus which is given to the students at the beginning of the semester. B. If students are to be charged, the costs should be included in a special fee for the class and indicated as such in the university catalog and on the course syllabus. C. The instructor/event leader is responsible for preparing a written notice which the students will use to communicate their absence to instructors of courses being missed. Missed tests, quizzes, and other class activities are to be made up as announced by the instructors of the classes missed. Every attempt should be made to schedule official activities at times for the least disruption of the regular class schedule.

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Graduate Policies

9.43 GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
A. A master’s degree graduate degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 30 semester credits with a grade-point average of 3.00 or better. All master’s students must pass their Capstone at 80% or higher. B. A Doctor of Physical Therapy degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 100 semester credits beyond a bachelor’s degree with a grade point average of 3.0 or better. C. An Educational Specialist degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 30 semester credits beyond a master’s degree with a grade point average of 3.25 or better. D. An Educational Doctorate degree at Concordia University, St. Paul, shall require a minimum of 60 semester credits beyond a master’s degree with a grade point average of 3.25 or better. E. All post-graduate students must meet the approval of their Capstone or Dissertation committee.

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9.42 GRADUATE ATTENDANCE POLICIES
The Graduate School assumes that all registered students have freely accepted personal responsibility for regular class attendance. Students are expected to attend all class meetings and laboratory sessions for the courses in which they are enrolled. In cases of emergencies and/or unforeseen circumstances students are expected to notify their instructors and arrange for any possible “makeup” assignments; however, instructors are not required to allow for such “makeup” assignments. All graduate programs/courses will have a stated attendance policy included in each syllabus. Additional attendance guidelines and requirements for graduate students: • While it is the student’s responsibility to communicate with the instructor regarding an absence, if the instructor has not heard from the student, and the student is not participating, the instructor should attempt to contact the student and the program’s academic advisor. • If a student knows in advance that he/she will be missing class, he/she is required: o to contact the professor as soon as possible before the absence o to complete any assignments due during his/her absence before departing for the planned absence o to gather missed materials from classmates as soon as possible upon his/her return o to communicate any concerns regarding the course content that was missed to the professor • If a student must miss a class/chat because of an emergency or illness, he/she is required: o to contact the professor in order to identify and complete his/her regular assignment(s) o to complete a make-up assignment that contributes to the subject being studied and enhances the class-learning environment • A missed class/chat may be made up for partial credit. • If a student misses two classes/chats, the instructor and the student need to discuss the student’s ability to complete the course. In addition, the student will be required to complete his/her regular assignment(s) and extra work. Specific procedures should be outlined in the syllabus. • Any additional absences will require retaking the course. The student will be billed and a grade will be issued each time the course is taken. • Regular attendance is a key factor in determining the continuing financial aid support. Attendance will be used to calculate the amount of aid to be returned if a student used Financial Aid (Title IV) and student discontinues enrollment or withdraws. • Instructors understand the uncertainty of military requirements and other contractual obligations, and they will work with the student to meet educational goals. • It is the student’s responsibility to contact the instructor to make appropriate arrangements. • All Chats and/or Web Ex sessions will be recorded as part of Financial Aid (Title IV) requirement to verify the last date of attendance. • Students with short or long-term disability concerns that may affect attendance should register with Student Accessibility Services. However, course participation is essential to courses and generally expected in accordance with this policy.

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9.41 SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS (SAP) POLICY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
A. To achieve satisfactory academic progress, a graduate student must maintain a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average (CGPA) and complete a minimum cumulative of 67% of all attempted graduate level coursework. Incompletes (I) and withdrawals (W) do not count toward completion. B. When a student does not maintain satisfactory progress, the University will impose certain restrictions that will affect the student’s eligibility for enrollment. 1. Academic Probation: Academic probation is a formal warning that students did not achieve satisfactory progress. Students will be notified of their probation status in writing by the Registrar. Academic probation status appears on the student’s internal records, but it is not part of the permanent transcript. a. Doctoral students are only allowed one semester of academic probation throughout their curriculum. 2. Academic Disqualification: Academic disqualification occurs when students do not meet satisfactory academic progress requirements for two consecutive terms. Students will be notified of their disqualification in writing by the Registrar. Students are ineligible to register for subsequent terms. Students may appeal to be re-admitted by completing the Disqualification Appeal Form. C. Disqualification Appeal Process: An appeal form must be submitted to the Graduate Academic Appeals Committee. The Graduate Academic Appeals Committee will decide approval or denial of students who are appealing their academic disqualification. Appeals must be submitted on the Disqualification Appeal Form and submitted to the academic appeals committee at least two weeks before the start of the term for which the student desires readmission. The appeal must state what undue hardship caused the student’s inability to meet satisfactory progress standards. Only special extenuating circumstances will be considered. Students must also explain how they propose to remedy their situation. If the appeal is successful, the student is readmitted on probationary status. Appeals are approved for one term only. Specific information in writing must document any appeal. The committee reviews each case and decides if the appeal is valid, the decision is announced to the student in writing, is final and not subject to further appeal.

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9.37 TRANSFER GRADUATE CREDIT
Up to 6 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the MA (MS). The credits must be appropriate to the student’s program and the course(s) must be equivalent to the course(s) in the program (i.e. outcomes (objectives) need to match). Application for transfer of credit is made by the student to the Advisor. The credits must be certified by the Registrar and approved for the degree program by the program director. 1. Up to 9 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the Ed.S. 2. Up to 12 semester credits may be accepted for transfer from an accredited graduate school for the Ed.D. 3. Normally no credits will be accepted for transfer into the DPT program. 4. Only courses with a grade of B or better may be accepted for transfer credit. 5. Normally credits older than five years will not be accepted. 6. The chair of the graduate program or designee will make the determination whether a student is required to audit a course in place of taking the course for a grade. 7. Students taking graduate level courses as part of a Concordia University – St. Paul graduate certificate, approved by the Graduate Policies Committee, may apply the entire graduate certificate’s credits to the graduate program to which it is connected. Specific programs and/or departments may establish institutional articulation agreements with other accredited institutions. Proposals outlining such agreements should be presented to the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, who will report such to the Graduate Policies Committee prior to approval.

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9.35 UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSION TO GRADUATE COURSES
Normally undergraduate students are not permitted to enroll in graduate courses without being admitted to the graduate program.

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9.34 INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE STUDENTS
1. International students must provide proof of English proficiency (if English is not the student’s first language). This can be established in the following ways: a. Completion of Level 112 at an ELS (English Language School) or Mastery Level at Global Language Institute (GLI) b. Completion of Level 6 at an approved English school c. TOEFL- iBT score of 78 or TOEFL PBT score of 547 d. An equated score of 80 or better on the Michigan Test e. IELTS overall band score of 6 or higher (International English Language Testing System). 2. English Proficiency would be accepted based on the additional standard: Completion of an undergraduate or graduate degree at an accredited college or university in the US, English-speaking Canada, the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, or New Zealand.

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9.33 ENROLLMENT BY CSP FACULTY AND STAFF
Faculty and staff employees of Concordia University are encouraged to enroll in graduate programs of the University. This enrollment is considered a benefit and is governed by policies of the Department of Human Resources. Guidelines for enrollment include: a. One employee or spouse per learner cohort. b. CSP employees or spouse will be assigned to cohorts on a space available basis. c. CSP employees or spouse must fulfill all requirements for admission to graduate programs.

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9.32 ADMISSION TO A GRADUATE PROGRAM
A. Each program shall require the following: 1. Documentation of a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution (e.g., Higher Learning Commission) or nationally accredited institutions recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and the U.S. Department of Education (e.g., Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools) and transcripts from any institution attended since baccalaureate. a. Applicants who are within one month or in their last course of completing their baccalaureate degree, may petition the respective graduate program chair for provisional admittance to a graduate program. b. If the baccalaureate degree is not completed as stipulated in the approved petition, the student will be dismissed from the program at the end of the course in which the student is currently enrolled. 2. An overall G.P.A. of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale. 3. An application and prescribed tuition prepayment. 4. Provisional Acceptance: Students who don’t meet minimum admission criteria may be admitted on a provisional basis with the approval of the Graduate Admission Committee. a. Doctoral students will begin the program on academic probation and will be dismissed from the program if they do not meet the 3.0 GPA standard the first semester. B. Potential students in post-graduate programs at Concordia University must be interviewed by the Program Director or an appointed designee, prior to admittance into the program. The interview should be in person and completed far enough in advance to permit the normal application process enough time to proceed to its conclusion. The following are to be a part of the interview: 1. Ensure that the potential student’s GPA is at least 3.25 in a master’s degree program from a regionally accredited academic institution. 2. Review the application form to discuss or clarify any information as necessary. 3. Review transcripts to determine which (if any) credits would transfer into the program. 4. Review professional recommendations and discuss any questionable statements. 5. Discuss prior administrative experiences. 6. Discuss professional goals. 7. Review program requirements. Based on the personal interview, application materials, and professional recommendations: , this student: _ This student is recommended for the credential program. _ This student is not recommended for the credential program. Signature: ___________________________________ Date: _________________________(Program Director) C. The DPT program requires set prerequisite courses, clinical observation hours, the GRE, and an interview as part of its application process. D. Additional requirements for specific programs will be outlined in the program handbook.

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9.24, Form 1 Overview and Introduction for New Graduate Courses, Emphases, Certificates, or Degrees
1. In 1-2 paragraphs describe the key dynamics — institutional mission and internal or external forces — that stimulated and shaped this proposal. 2. Discuss how this program would help realize Concordia’s Mission and Promise to Students. Characteristics of the proposed program 1. The full name of the proposed program, the specific degree or the instructional level (if not a degree program), and the six-digit CIP code of the program. Consult with AVP of Assessment and Accreditation for CIP codes. 2. The total credit hours for completion of the program: 3. Normal or typical length of time for students to complete the program: 4. The proposed initial date for implementation of the program: 5. The primary target audience for the program (e.g., full-time, part-time, traditional college age, working adults, transfer students, military personnel, or particular ethnic group) 6. The projected life of the program (limited number of terms or ongoing): 7. Whether the program will be part of a contractual or consortial arrangement (please see chart below). Identify External Accreditation, Advisory Groups, and/or Key Partnerships Supporting the Program If you are planning any involvement by external organizations (other than accredited higher education institutions) in key operations as identified below, provide the information requested for each planned involvement. (Note that such involvement by a parent company or by one of its subsidiaries external to the institution in any of these operations should be reported.) Type of involvement Name(s) of external organization(s) % of Involvement A. Recruitment and admission of students B. Course placement and advising of students C. Design and oversight of curriculum D. Direct instruction and oversight E. Other support for delivery of instruction Institution’s History with Programs 1. Does the institution currently offer a program at the same instructional level and with the same 4-digit CIP code (XX.XX) as the proposed program? If so, identify the program currently offered and whether it is a degree program. Will the proposed program replace the program currently offered? 2. Does the institution currently offer two or more programs at the same instructional level with same 2-digit CIP code (XX.) as the proposed program? If so, identify the two such programs with the highest numbers of graduates during the past year, along with their numbers of graduates. Institutional Planning for Program Change 1. Briefly describe the planning process for determining the need for this new program, including the role of faculty in the planning and approval process. 2. What are the physical facilities and equipment needed to support the program? Indicate the impact that the proposed change will have on the physical resources and laboratories that currently accommodate existing programs and services, or identify new laboratory and preceptor needs. 3. What is the evidence that a market for the new program(s) exists? How has estimated program demand been factored into realistic enrollment projections? How has this evidence been used in planning and budgeting processes to develop a quality program that can be sustained? 4. If the program request is approved, what future growth do you anticipate (e.g., in the next six months, three years) and how do you plan to manage this growth? 5. How does this program fit into the current and expected financial picture of the institution? In particular, will the program be financially self-sufficient within three years? If not, when do you expect the program to be financially self-sufficient and how do you expect the program to operate until then? 6. What controls are in place to ensure that the information presented to students in advertising, brochures, and other communications will be accurate? For example: Program Cost Model Academic Year 13/14 14/15 15/16 16/17 17/18 Number of Students 15 30 40 40 40 Credits Generated – 8 per semester: Fall 120 240 320 320 320 Spring 120 240 320 320 320 Summer 120 240 320 320 320 Cost per credit $460 $470 $480 $490 $500 Total Revenue $165,60 0 $338,40 0 $460,80 0 $470,40 0 $480,00 0 Salaries $50,000 $80,000 $150,00 0 $200,00 0 $250,00 0 Other expenses $50,000 $70,000 $90,000 $110,00 0 $130,00 0 Total Expenses $100,00 0 $140,00 0 $275,00 0 $350,00 0 $400,00 0 Profit/(Loss) $65,600 $198,40 0 $185,80 0 $120400 $80,000 Curriculum and Instructional Design 1. Please list the Program Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes. 2. Please list all the courses that comprise the program. Include course descriptions and number of credit hours for each. 3. What are the requirements students must fulfill to complete the program successfully (including specific courses, course options, and any other requirements)? Total number of credits for the program? 4. For programs using prior learning credit, compressed time frames, online delivery, accelerated formats, or other innovative approaches to learning, explain how the institution will ensure that student work and the levels of knowledge and competencies comparable to those required in traditional formats have been achieved? Institutional Staffing, Faculty, and Student Support 1. How many and what types (full-time, part-time, adjunct) of faculty will be employed in the program? Why is the number of full-time faculty members adequate to support the program? 2. What will the impact of the new initiative have on faculty workload? 3. Provide a brief attachment that inventories each faculty member employed to teach in the program, including names of existing personnel, a description of each faculty member’s academic qualifications, their prior instructional responsibility and other experiences relevant to the courses they will teach in the program in question, each faculty member’s course load in the new program, and the course work each teaches in other programs currently offered. 4. Document scholarship and research capability of each faculty member; for doctoral programs, document faculty experience in directing student research. 5. What library and information resources—general as well as specific to the program(s)—and staffing and services are in place to support the initiative? If the proposed new program is at the graduate level, document discipline-specific refereed journals and primary source materials. The Concordia University Library Technology Center (http://concordia.csp.edu/Library/) is a member of Cooperating Libraries in Consortium (CLIC http://www.clic.edu/). CLIC consists of eight member universities that share a common library catalog called CLICnet (http://clicnet.clic.edu/). CLICnet provides access to nearly 2,000,000 resources in CLIC member libraries, including books and journals in both print and electronic formats. Twice daily courier service delivers CLIC resources from library to library. Reference services are available in person, by phone, email and instant messaging. Online reference chat is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week as the library is a member of AskMN, a 24/7 online reference chat cooperative (http://askmn.org/). In addition to in-person bibliographic and research instruction, the reference staff utilizes WebEx for instruction to online courses. The Concordia University Library Technology Center currently subscribes to numerous databases that would support a xxxxxxxxx program. These database subscriptions include: In addition to the books available through CLICnet, the Concordia University Library Technology Center also has subscriptions to the following ebook collections: Ebrary; eBooks on EBSCOhost; NCBI Bookshelf; and Credo Reference. In addition to the many full-text journals available through our database subscriptions, the Concordia University Library Technology Center subscribes to the following journals: (Include relevant journals) xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx For those journals and books that we do not have in our collection, the Library Technology Center offers an interlibrary loan service (ILLiad) to our students, staff and faculty. Evaluation 1. Describe the process for monitoring, evaluating, and improving the overall effectiveness and quality of the program. 2. Describe the process for assessing and improving student learning, including student persistence and completion, in the new program. Sign Offs, along with supportive statements by: Each step should include a copy of meeting minutes or written statement endorsing the graduate program. Calendar Step in process Completi on Date Attached Statement or Minutes Program Proposers College Graduate Faculty & Collegiate Dean Graduate Admissions: Assoc VP Cohort Enroll Mgmt Associate Vice President for Assessment And Accreditation Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies Vice President for Academic Affairs Senior Vice President Graduate Council Report to Faculty Senate Concordia University System

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9.24 PROPOSALS FOR NEW GRADUATE COURSES, EMPHASES, PROGRAMS OR DEGREES
A. Introducing a New Course in an Existing Program 1. An instructor may, in consultation with the department, develop a new course. 2. Courses maybe taught on an experimental basis with a prospectus with approval of the department and the dean of the college. 3. Before a new course is taught for the second time, the department shall review and approve the syllabus. Upon approval, the department chair shall furnish copies of the syllabus to the dean of the college. 4. The dean of the college shall determine whether the course and the syllabus are in harmony with faculty policy, Principles of Graduate Education, and institutional objectives and is authorized to delay the offering of the course if the syllabus is unacceptable. As necessary, the dean of the college shall consult with department chairs and the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies in order to resolve problems that may arise. In cases where institutional policy conflicts with the plans of a department, the Graduate Policies Committee will examine the problem and recommend policy changes. 5. When the change involves courses related to teacher licensure, the department sponsoring the course should consult with the department of teacher education unit, and as needed to the appropriate state regulatory agencies responsible for licensure. 6. After approval of the course syllabus by the department and the dean of the college, the dean of the college shall announce to the faculty the adoption of the course into the curriculum in regular publication for faculty and staff and shall list it in the next catalog. Course descriptions will normally be printed in the catalog for those courses that are offered regularly and for which a syllabus has been approved. 7. Criteria for Acceptance of New Courses. In terms of criteria for the acceptance of a new course, the proposed course will do one or more of the following: a. help meet the mission of the university and college and their general objectives in a way not already offered through an existing course; b. reflect the Principles of Graduate Education; c. be fiscally feasible in terms of staffing and instructional materials resources; d. meet state of Minnesota licensure requirements (if applicable); e. afford opportunity to utilize resources due to the college’s geographic locations; f. contribute to the curriculum in a meaningful way as evidenced by research; g. add depth to a presently set emphasis, certificate or degree; h. fill specific needs expressed by students/graduates; i. serve as an enrichment opportunity in the overall learning experiences of the student; j. provide opportunity for particular faculty members to utilize their expertise; k. provide special opportunity for experimentation with innovative methodology; l. strengthen a particular academic field; m. contribute to the development of graduate opportunities for leadership development for community and/or church. All new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should demonstrate an affirmative response to the following questions. 5 gates for consideration of new academic programs 1. Is there a market for the new program? 2. Do we have the capacity to deliver? 3. If we don’t have the internal capacity, who is our external partner? 4. How does it fit with university mission, vision, and promise? 5. Will it contribute to the revenue stream of the University? Proposers for new emphases, certificates, programs or degrees should consult with the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies in preparation for the written proposal. The general outline for the proposal is listed below. In addition, proposers should follow the “calendar steps” leading to approval of the proposal. Developing new courses for a new graduate program. Courses should be developed based on the approved proposal. Steps: 1. For each course, faculty should be identified, having the content expertise to complete the task. 2. The syllabus and course should be developed concurrently. a. The course should be developed in the Learning Management System (Blackboard) in alignment with the standard template. b. Content and assignments should be included in the course. 3. The syllabus and course should be peer reviewed. One member from the department (who is able to comment thoughtfully on the content), and one from outside the department (someone from the college who has online learning experience). Reviewers’ names and dates should be included in a footer. 4. Submit syllabus and course to dean for final approval. Stipend request. 5. The creator of the syllabus and course should expect to teach the course the first time. 6. Revisions to the syllabus and course, based on instructor review and student feedback, should be made and sent to the department chair or dean for final approval. Stipend request. B. Introducing a New Emphasis 1. The emphasis shall support the mission of the university. 2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the emphasis. 3. New Emphases shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review. 4. The Emphasis should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome project. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee. C. Introducing a New Certificate Program 1. The certificate shall support the mission of the university. 2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the certificate. 3. The certificate program, a package of courses available for credit shall support the mission of the university. 4. New certificates shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review. 5. The Certificate should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome project. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee. D. Introducing a New Program or Degree 1. The program or degree shall support the mission of the university. 2. University capacity will be adequate for the needs of the program or degree. 3. Board of Regents can request and approve development of an academic program or degree, LCMS 3.8.3.6.4 (LCMS Handbook). 4. President can make academic program recommendations to the Board of Regents, LCMS 3.8.3.7 (LCMS Handbook). 5. New programs or degrees shall have the approval of these entities: college graduate faculty, collegiate dean, graduate admissions, Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies, VPAA, SVP, and the graduate policies committee. A report of such approval will be made to the faculty senate. The proposal shall include provisions for regular review. 6. The program or degree should demonstrate meeting the graduate core: research, ethics and outcome Capstone. Future changes to the graduate core must have prior approval by the Graduate Policies Committee. E. Procedures for the Approval of New Courses, Emphases, Certificate Programs and Degrees. The Graduate Policies Committee, in cooperation with other units of the university, establishes the procedures by which new courses, emphases, certificate programs and degrees are developed. F. Procedure for undergraduate / graduate program development. The institution’s policy and practice assure that at least 50% of courses applied to a graduate program are courses designed for graduate work, rather than undergraduate courses credited toward a graduate degree. (An institution may allow well-prepared advanced students to substitute its graduate courses for required or elective courses in an undergraduate degree program and then subsequently count those same courses as fulfilling graduate requirements in a related graduate program that the institution offers. In “4+1” or “2+3” programs, at least 50% of the credits allocated for the master’s degree – usually 15 of 30 – must be for courses designed for graduate work.). [from the Higher Learning Commission]

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9.23 GRADUATE ACCREDITATION
A. Concordia University is accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Institutions of Higher Education, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60602-2504, Tel. 800-621- 7440. B. Programs educating individuals to work with PK-12 students are designed to be accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). C. The DPT program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE).

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9.22 GRADUATE ASSESSMENT
A. Annual Assessment 1. Graduate programs of the university will be assessed annually. 2. Program directors, department chairs, or emphasis coordinators will be responsible for the implementation of assessment plans. B. Annual assessment reports will be provided to the associate dean of university assessment and to the dean of the college in which the program is offered.

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9.21 GRADUATE DEGREES OFFERED
A. Master of Arts in Education Emphases: 1. Early Childhood 2. Differentiated Instruction 3. Educational Technology 4. Curriculum and Instruction w/ K-12 Reading Endorsement 5. Curriculum and Instruction – General 6. Education Leadership 7. Special Education with SLD, EBD, or ASD licensure B. Master of Arts in Teaching – Initial K-6 Licensure C. Master of Arts in Family Science D. Master of Arts in Sport Management E. Master of Arts in Criminal Justice Leadership F. Master of Arts in Leadership and Management G. Master of Arts in Human Resources Management H. Master of Business Administration Emphasis: 1. Health Care Management 2. Health Care Compliance 3. Information Technology Management I. Master of Arts in Strategic Communication Management J. Master of Science in Information Technology Management K. Master of Arts in Human Services Emphases: 1. Forensic Behavioral Health 2. Forensic Behavioral Health Certificate L. Master of Science in Exercise Science M.Master of Science in Orthotics and Prosthetics N. Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing O. Educational Specialist Emphases: 1. Principal Licensure 2. Superintendent Licensure P. Doctor of Physical Therapy Q. Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Administration Leadership, General.

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9.15 PROGRAM INTEGRITY AND RESPONSIBILITY TO GRADUATE POLICY
The Graduate Program Department Chair/Coordinator is responsible for: ● The content of the learning outcomes and curriculum for the graduate programs in their respective areas. ● For knowing, understanding, and implementing approved Graduate policies and procedures. ● For demonstrating to the Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) how programs meet Graduate policies and procedures. The AVP-GS reports specifically how each program is responding to the approved graduate policies, procedures and initiatives to the Graduate Policies Committee. Programs failing to meet approved policies, procedures, and initiatives the following actions may be taken: 1. During this probationary period, the Graduate Policies Committee may propose to the Collegiate Dean the Program Coordinator /Department Chair be placed on probationary status for a period of no less than six months. a. Probationary status will be reported to the Collegiate Dean, VPAA, and the Senior Vice President (SVP). b. Graduate faculty on probation would be ineligible: to teach overload courses; advance in rank; and serve on University committees. c. Probation may include the following actions, dependent upon the extent of the violation: suspension of budgetary resources; removal from Chair/Coordinator position; or University contract not renewed. 2. The graduate program can be suspended from Graduate Policies Committee (GPC) program approval for a period of six months and/or until the requirement(s) is satisfactorily met as determined by the AVP-GS and the Graduate Policies Committee. a. Program suspension will be reported to the Faculty Senate Chair person, Collegiate Dean, VPAA, and the SVP. b. Once the program has satisfactorily responded to graduate program policies and/or procedures, the lifted suspension will be reported to the Faculty Senate. 3. Persistent failure to support Graduate Policies may culminate in removal from approved graduate program status (FH. 9.21). a. Removal would be reported to the Faculty Senate Chair person, Collegiate Dean, VPAA, and the SVP. b. The Program Coordinator /Department Chair maybe returned to good standing once the program has satisfactorily responded to graduate program policies, procedures and/or initiatives and has produced sufficient evidence support such. 4. Appeals to program suspension and faculty probation are made in writing to the Collegiate Dean. Appeals are considered by the Graduate Policies Appeals Committee. 5. The Program Coordinator /Department Chair may present evidence of program change(s) reflecting Graduate Policies and Procedures to the Collegiate Dean and the AVP-GS who will verify changes on behalf of the Graduate Policies Committee. The AVP-GS will report confirmed changes to the Graduate Policies Committee. a. Once the program has been approved in meeting the requirements, the probationary period may be ended along with any imposed sanctions. b. The end of suspension and probation will be reported to the Faculty Senate Chair, Collegiate Dean, VPAA, and SVP. c. If a graduate program is placed on probation twice within a three year period, an external program review will be initiated by the AVP-GS in conjunction with the Graduate Policies Committee as to the feasibility of continuing as an approved graduate program at the University. Definition – Good Standing 1. Programs a. Reflect Principles of Graduate Education b. Have an updated, relevant Graduate Core c. Have synthesized the Graduate School Student Outcomes in the scope and sequence of their curriculum and can show evidence of such in the Capstone. d. Are diligent in meeting the annual Graduate School program initiatives. e. Eligible for Graduate Assistant support. 2. Graduate Faculty a. Be active in research appropriate to the field or discipline b. Be involved in professional experience related to degree program or courses of study. c. Will continue to expand relevant skills in graduate level teaching. d. Will advise graduate students and be willing to serve on graduate student capstone committees. e. Are eligible for reduced teaching loads to pursue research agenda.

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9.14 CHANGING GRADUATE CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS
A. Changing a Course 1. The individual instructor may make non-substantive course revisions for upgrading and updating. 2. If the course objectives or purpose of the class are to be altered, the chair of the department is to approve the revisions. A revised syllabus that has been approved by the department chair shall be submitted to the dean of the college. 3. When the change involves courses related to teacher licensure, the department sponsoring the course should consult with the department of teacher education unit, and as needed to the appropriate state regulatory agencies responsible for licensure. 4. The dean of the college communicates the approved changes as needed to the faculty, staff and/or students. 5. An Academic Change Form should be submitted to the registrar when changes to course title, number, description or grading procedure is needed. B. Proposals for making a substantive change* to a graduate core requirement (research, ethics, and capstone course) must be approved in the following sequence: 1. College / Collegiate Dean 2. Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies 3. Graduate Policies Committee. 4. An Academic Change Form should be submitted to the registrar. * Questions regarding degree of change requiring GPC approval should be coordinated through the office of the Associate Vice President for Graduate Education. C. Changing the requirements of a graduate certificate, graduate program or program emphasis. 1. The department that is proposing the change consults all other graduate departments affected by the change. 2. The department may propose the change of a course(s) or addition of course options within credit limits set by the Graduate Policies Committee. Proposals exceeding credit limits must be approved by the College, Associate Vice President for Graduate Enrollment, and the Graduate Polices Committee. 3. If the changes do not affect the total number of credit hours, purpose of program, or involve the graduate core by the faculty, only department and dean of the college approval are needed. 4. When approval is obtained, the Collegiate Dean or Associate Vice President for Graduate Studies notifies the appropriate faculty members, administrators, and publications. 5. An Academic Change Form should be submitted to the registrar.

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9.13 PRINCIPLIES OF GRADUATE STUDY
Coursework at the graduate level is not just different classes than the undergraduate. It is not simply more information on a particular topic. It is designed to be a qualitatively different experience. Concordia University has accepted these principles as the practical ways graduate education will be delivered at Concordia. 1. Graduate coursework is more creative. Students create systems that will help them to be a more effective professional. 2. Graduate coursework is more self-directed. In many assignments, students decide how to fashion an assignment to help them apply and synthesize the material more appropriately. 3. Graduate coursework is more rigorous. More is expected of the graduate student than of the certificate or undergraduate student. 4. Graduate coursework is more attentive to epistemological issues. More attention is given to “how we know what we know,” and to how we prove and support what we know. Skills of discernment and critical thinking are needed. 5. Graduate coursework is more attentive to research. Students will be exploring (and conducting) new research. They will read and critique original research. 6. Graduate coursework is more a community of learners, rather than merely a teacher-student relationship. Graduate students are assumed to have reached an intellectual maturity that puts them at a place where the role of the instructor is different. Instructors do not have to spoon-feed or hand-hold; instructors need to guide and mentor the mature student in the direction that the student has identified. 7. Graduate students give careful consideration to research, information, and bibliographic references. The skills of knowledge navigation are increasingly important in the years ahead, and graduate students know how to find the knowledge they need. 8. Graduate learning is not just remembering information, it is constructing knowledge. The community of learners opens new insights and creates new knowledge in the field. 9. Graduate professors are actively engaged in research and learning. This helps them maintain a cutting edge in their profession. “It is the role of graduate education to explore and advance the limits of knowledge and to define the state of the art in every field. Its purpose is to serve society’s needs in specific technical and professional ways, but also to serve the need for intellectual expansion. Graduate education is a major source of future intellectual leaders of society…” Adapted from Organization and Administration of Graduate Education: A Policy Statement, Council of Graduate Schools

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9.12 GRADUATE DEFINITIONS
A. Master’s Degrees: at least 30 credits. (see 9.21 for approved list) B. Specialization: at least 30 credits beyond the Master’s degree. May be earned in: 1. Education – Principal Licensure/Superintendent Licensure (ED.S) C. Doctoral Degree: May be earned in: 1. Physical Therapy (DPT) – 111 credits 2. Education (ED.D) – at least 60 credits D. Certificate is a package of courses available for credit but not typically fulfilling graduation requirements for, e.g., an emphasis. E. Emphasis consists of twelve to sixteen credits taken in courses in one area or related areas of study prescribed in the university catalog. F. Church certification consists of a course of study that leads to certification for commissioned ministries in the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod (DCE, DPM, DCO, and LCT). G. Credit consists of a semester hour credit. H. Independent study is an educational experience offered for credit outside the regularly scheduled classes. I. Cohort is normally a group of 12 – 15 learners who move through the whole course of study in a program together. 1. Each DPT class is 30 students. J. Graduate Student status 1. “Full-time Graduate Students” are students who have been formally accepted into a graduate degree program and enrolled in a minimum of 6 credits in a semester. 2. “Half-time Graduate Students” are students who have been formally accepted into a graduate degree program and are enrolled in 3 – 5 credits in a semester.” 3. “Visiting students” are those students who have registered for graduate courses but have not been admitted to a program. 4. Students who have not completed all admission requirements for degree- seeking status may register as visiting students until these requirements have been met. K. Offering means that the course or specialization has been approved by the appropriate faculty unit(s) and is taught by Concordia University, St. Paul, faculty. L. Licensure Programs are courses of study that lead to teaching, principal, or superintendent licensure or church work certification (DCE, DPM, DCO, ED.S) or licensure to practice (DPT). M. Faculty who meet the following criteria will be designated as graduate faculty, be eligible to serve on the graduate committee, and have voting privileges in plenary meetings: 1. Graduate faculty will annually be designated by the Vice President for Academic Affairs, in consultation with the Associate Vice-President for Graduate Studies, and each of the Collegiate Deans. 2. Faculty not meeting the 3rd criteria (below) for Graduate Faculty status must provide an action plan to the Collegiate Dean and the AVP for Graduate Studies. Upon receipt, the faculty member will be granted one year probationary status. 3. The procedure to regain Graduate Faculty status is to present evidence of the terminal degree, graduate level teaching workload, and research or scholarship in the field or discipline (curriculum vitae) to the Collegiate Dean and AVP for Graduate Studies. Designated Graduate Faculty must meet all of the following 3 criteria: 1. Graduate faculty must hold a terminal degree in an appropriate field of study or at minimum a master’s degree or clinical specialization in an appropriate field of study plus a demonstrated minimum of 10,000 hours of professional experience in the discipline and relevant to the course(s) they are teaching. Determination of “demonstrated professional experience” is made by the program coordinator and associate vice president for graduate studies with final approval from the vice president for academic affairs. Graduate faculty are expected to meet the qualifications set up by relevant accrediting bodies. 2. Graduate faculty will teach graduate level courses on a regular basis or be administratively responsible for an approved graduate program (see FH 9.21). 3. Graduate faculty must be active in research appropriate to the field or discipline. Documentation of research should be submitted to the Graduate School regularly through the scholarship data base (See FH 2.72). Graduate Faculty should meet the following criteria in an ongoing manner: 1. Graduate faculty must have significant professional experience related to degree program or courses of study. 2. Faculty will possess appropriate current experience in graduate level teaching. 3. Graduate faculty must advise graduate students and be willing to serve on graduate student capstone committees. 4. Graduate faculty may serve as members of the graduate Policies Committee. N. Service Loads for graduate faculty will normally be computed in the faculty members’ regular workload. Service loads and overloads for graduate faculty will be coordinated between the deans of the colleges. O. Prospectus is an abbreviated syllabus, a brief proposal for a newly developed course. The prime objective of the prospectus is to give the rationale and purpose of the course in terms of program and student needs. The prospectus should include the following information: 1. Course title and number, course description, and number of credits 2. Prerequisites 3. Rationale for the course in the specific program or curriculum 4. Specific objectives of the course and its relationship to the department, college and university 5. Outline of units 6. Course assessment procedures 7. Bibliography of learning materials: texts, course materials, library resources 8. Date of prospectus approval by the department and the dean of the college. P. Syllabus is a cognitive map or blueprint for a course. It is to include the objectives for the course, the means by which the objectives are to be achieved, and the assessment procedures for measuring the achievement of the objectives. The syllabus should include the topics and use the format that follows: I. The mission of the university: The mission of Concordia University, a university of The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, is to prepare students for thoughtful and informed living, for dedicated service to God and humanity, and for enlightened care of God’s creation, all within the context of the Christian Gospel. II. Course number; section number; course title III. Prerequisites/co-requisites IV. Credit hours V. Contact hours per week: number of lectures, laboratories, individualized instruction, conference, clinics, field placements, co-op hours; chat, etc. VI. Instructor’s name, office location, college telephone numbers and instructor’s extension number, voice mail, e-mail and fax numbers VII. Office/contact hours VIII. University catalog course description IX. Instructor’s course description (optional) X. Instructional goals and objectives XI. Student goals and objectives (optional) XII. Instructor’s educational philosophy (optional) XIII. Teaching procedures (optional) XIV. Attendance and tardiness policies XV. Classroom atmosphere XVI. Required texts (annotated list optional) XVII. Supplementary reading: material on reserve or recommended reading XVIII. Assessment. Criteria for student grading; explanation of instructor’s evaluation instruments: class participation, quizzes, tests, papers, reports, labs, projects, chat rooms, bulletin boards; policies on late assignments; makeup, work for extra credit, plagiarism; students with disabilities XIX. Support services: libraries; labs, tutors, transfer, career and personal counseling; Campus Ministry; advisors XX. Course outline XXI. Extras: grade-recording sheet, student sign-off sheet, letter to students, textbook preview, calendar, maps, timelines XXII. Course Administration Information (e.g., maximum number of students, specific classroom or other facility requirements) Q. Course numbering for graduate credit will be indicated by a 500 or higher designation. In courses designated undergraduate/graduate there shall be a section of the syllabus clearly designating graduate requirements. 1. DPT, ED.S. and ED.D. program courses will be indicated by a 7000 or higher designation. O. Course delivery methods for programs: CLASSROOM or ONSITE DELIVERY: Courses offered in a classroom setting where students and instructors meet face-to-face on published dates. Course management software may be used to supplement resources, report student progress, etc. An online assignment or substitute activity does not constitute a significant portion of course activity. DISTANCE or ONLINE DELIVERY: Courses are specifically designed for and structured around course management software (e.g. WebCT, Blackboard). Students are not expected to meet together for learning activities. (A program residency, even with a course component, does not change the ONLINE nature of the program.). BLENDED DELIVERY: Each course in the program has designated ONSITE and ONLINE weeks of activity. Because of the specialized content of certain courses, a few courses may be entirely ONSITE or entirely ONLINE.

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9.11 GRADUATE PRINCIPLES OF ACADEMIC CURRICULAR POLICY
A. Instructors and others contracted to prepare curriculum are to follow the guidelines in Section 9.12, Definitions, for the preparation of course prospecti and course syllabi. The Dean of the appropriate college has the responsibility to keep all graduate course prospecti and course syllabi current. B. Each program must have a research course addressing principles of design, primary sources, data collection and analysis, and research ethics within the context of the program’s discipline. The DPT program’s course will also address evidence-based practice. C. Each program must have an ethics course addressing principles and standards for ethical thinking and practice within the context of the program’s discipline and the Mission of the University. D. Each master’s program and the Doctorate programs must have a Capstone component or an equivalent approved by the Graduate Policies Committee. a. Doctoral Student Capstones (Special Projects and Dissertations) should be planned, executed, and assessed within the parameters of the degree offered. If unclear, reliance on the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes can provide direction. A committee appointed by the Associate Vice President for Graduate will review capstone topics. b. Master Student Capstones (Thesis and Non-thesis) should be planned, executed, and assessed within the parameters of the degree offered. If unclear, reliance on the Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) codes can provide direction. E. All substantive changes made to Graduate Core courses (research, ethics, and capstone) must be approved by the Graduate School via Graduate Policies Committee. F. The Written Comprehensive. a. Ed.S. and Ed.D. students will take a written comprehensive examination (unless they took it in the ED.S. program). Students completing the Ed.S. and the Ed.D. will take one written comprehensive examination. (Students who take the Ed.S. will take the written comprehensive examination and oral defense of the portfolio; students who take the Ed.D. will take one written comprehensive, defense of the portfolio, and defense of the dissertation.) b. DPT students will take written and practical comprehensive examinations at the end of the first and second years of their curriculum. Achieving a passing score is necessary to progress to the second and third years of the curriculum respectively. G. Each program must follow the Graduate Policies Committee Student Handbook guidelines.

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9.44 GRADUATE ADVISOR AND COMMITTEE
A. Advisor 1. All students will be assigned an advisor. 2. All students shall receive academic advice from a graduate CSP faculty person. B. Committee 1. A student’s committee shall consist of a committee chair and one or two readers approved by the program director. 2. The chair of the committee shall be CSP graduate faculty. 3. Exceptions shall be approved by the program director.

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9.45 GRADING – GRADUATE PROGRAM
A. Grading 1. Grade reports are available online at the end of each course. 2. Conceptual Grading Standards in the Graduate School The grade of C indicates that the student showed a fair understanding of the material and was able to express that understanding clearly and accurately. However, this level of understanding does not meet graduate level expectations. Assignments were completed on time, and for multiple segment work (e.g., discussion board posts) there were sufficient entries to show consistent effort and understanding. The grade of B indicates that the student not only showed a fair understanding and diligence, but went beyond a fair understanding, able to extend the knowledge to other situations, making application between the material and other concepts and contexts. The expression of these ideas shows greater depth of understanding and critical thinking. The grade of A indicates a superior level of understanding of the material and expression of ideas, with a depth of critical thinking, synthesis and evaluation on issues such that the individual shows a professional level of understanding of the material. ● The above should be included in all graduate syllabi. The following scale is used in evaluating a student’s work: A Superior 4 grade points B Good 3 grade points C Fair 2 grade points F Failure 0 grade points I In-Progress 0 grade points W Withdraw 0 grade points P Pass Not included in grade point calculations N No-pass Not included in grade point calculations 3. In-Progress Grades a. A student not completing required coursework before the end of a course may, at the discretion of the instructor, receive an “In-progress” (I) grade for the course. The student must complete an “In-Progress Request Form” and have it approved by the course instructor and the Program Director or Chair. b. “In-Progress” grades for courses graded on a Pass/No Pass basis are converted to “No pass” (N) grades, and courses graded A-F are converted to an F if a final grade has not been submitted by the time period agreed upon by student and instructor. c. Students may not carry more than two “In-Progress” grades at any one time. B. Repeating a Course A student may repeat a course in which a grade of C, N or F has been earned upon approval by the program director and the college dean. While all grades remain on the student’s academic record and transcript, only the highest grade awarded will be used in calculating the student’s grade point average. C. Withdrawing 1. A student may request the grade of “W” before a course is 80% complete, based upon the course calendar. If the course is more than 80% complete, the student’s grade is calculated based upon graded components stated in the syllabus. 2. Withdrawing from a class may have financial implications. Consult the University Catalog. D. Changing or Appealing a Grade After It Has Been Issued Errors in recording or miscalculation must be changed no later than the end of the semester following the error. Grade changes must have accompanying documentation and be approved by the Department or Program Chair and the Dean of the College in which the program resides. Students who wish to appeal a final grade will follow the procedures found in FH 9.47. The appeal must be initiated no later than 5 university business days after grades are officially posted by the registrar’s office. The appeal of a grade must follow the appeals process found in FH 9.47. E. Graduate Academic Appeals Committee The Graduate Policies Committee serves as a group of faculty and administrators to hear student academic and non-academic appeals. If students believe an academic or nonacademic action has been taken, the student may follow the appeal procedures outlined in FH policies 9.47 and 9.66.

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9.46 GRADUATE PROGRAM COMPLETION TIME LIMITS
A. Master’s degree programs must be completed within five years of the beginning of the first course. B. Ed.S. degree programs must be completed within six years of the beginning of the first course. C. Ed.D. degree programs must be completed within seven years of the beginning of the first course. D. DPT degree programs must be completed within four years of the beginning of the first course.

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9.47 APPEAL OF GRADUATE POLICY AND PROCEDURE
A. The Graduate Appeals Committee Appointed by the Associate Vice President (AVP) for Graduate Studies, the Graduate Appeals Committee will hear the appeal and review all relevant documents. The AVP may request additional documentation from the student and/or other departments within the University. The Graduate Appeals Committee will consist of the AVP for Graduate Studies, the registrar, the AVP for Graduate Enrollment, a member from the Graduate Policies Committee, and a Collegiate Dean. This committee will review all academic disqualification appeals for graduate students. B. Graduate students may appeal decisions made by program faculty or administrators regarding disqualification, re-admission, grade change, or academic integrity regarding entry into a program, continuation in a program, or questions that may arise as a result of a candidate’s academic performance in a program. C. Steps for making an appeal (re-admission, grade course change, or academic integrity). 1. Student submits completed Appeal of Academic Dishonesty Graduate Form to the Dean’s Office. 2. The Dean reviews the form and determines if appeal should be granted based on stated reason for appeal. a. If Request for Appeal is denied, the Dean will email the student with reason for denial. b. If Request` for Appeal is approved, the Dean will email the student and followup. 3. If denied, the student may appeal the decision to the Graduate Appeals Committee. a. Submit appeal to the Associate Vice-President for Graduate Studies (AVP-GS) for consideration by the Graduate Academic Appeals Committee. b. If Request for Appeal is denied, the AVP-GS will email the student with reason for denial. c. If Request for Appeal is approved, the AVP-GS will email the student and followup. 4. Final Appeal Option a. If denied, the student may appeal a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. If appeal is denied, the student can appeal the decision a final time to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. b. The Vice President for Academic Affairs will review the case and email the student of decision and reason. c. No further appeals are allowed after this decision.

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9.51 UNIVERSITY AND GRADUATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
A. Students must complete all requirements as specified by the program. B. In addition, the following university policies must be completed: 1. 3.0 GPA 2. Transcript documenting completion of all program requirements 3. Documentation of payment of all tuition and fees.

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9.52 DATE FOR GRADUATE TRANSCRIPTS AND DIPLOMA
Transcripts and diplomas will reflect the degree awarded and the term date during which all academic work was completed.

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9.53 COMPLETION OF GRADUATE REQUIREMENTS
A. Candidates who complete all course requirements within 30 calendar days following the end of a regular academic term at Concordia University are listed as graduates of that term. B. Degree requirements are completed when all grades for course have been filed and recorded by the Registrar.

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9.54 GRADUATE COMMENCEMENT
A. Students will be invited to participate in the annual commencement ceremony in May providing all coursework will be completed by the forthcoming September. B. Students who are unable to participate in the May ceremony may graduate in absentia. C. The graduation/capstone fee will be assessed regardless of participation in the graduation ceremony.

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9.62 RESEARCH WITH HUMAN SUBJECTS
A. Ethical and policy issues in research involving human participants are grounded in Concordia University, St. Paul’s mission in the enlightened care of God’s creation and the safeguarding of human participants in all research under which the University is a part. The University will comply with all federal regulations requiring the establishment and operation of an Institutional Review Board for the protection of human participants. B. All research that can be defined as “a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge” (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services – 45 CFR 46) must be reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Participants (IRB). C. IRB review is also required of research carried out under the sponsorship of an institution other than Concordia University, St. Paul, but which is performed on the premises of Concordia University, St. Paul, even if the research has already been approved by the IRB at the sponsoring institution or elsewhere. D. Students and Faculty who are planning to conduct research are directed to use and follow FHB Section 8, Appendix D: Concordia University Saint Paul, MN Protocols and Procedures for Research Involving Human Subjects Application and Information Packet and Appendix E: Protocol Form Research Involving Human Subjects. E. Faculty and student researchers must successfully complete Human Subjects training through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) program prior to submitting protocol forms for IRB review. All researchers must maintain valid (non-expired) certification of CITI training. The CITI certification is good for three (3) years from date of successful completion.

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9.63 RELEASE OF GRADUATE STUDENT INFORMATION
A. Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), Concordia University defines the following information as directory information: the student’s name, address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and teams, dates of attendance, degree and awards received, and the most recent educational institution attended by the student. This information may be released unless the student notifies the Registrar of a specific hold. B. Concordia intends to comply fully with this act in order to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through formal and informal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Office concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the act.

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9.64 TEXTBOOK SELECTION- GRADUATE COURSES
Graduate course texts will be approved by the program chair

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9.65 FACULTY COMMUNICATION WITH GRADUATE STUDENTS
Graduate faculty will be available for student contact by personal appointment, phone consultation, or e-mail interaction. All student requests for a response shall be honored in a timely manner.

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9.66 ACADEMIC INTEGRITY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
A. Definition of Terms 1. Academic integrity is essential to any academic institution and is in keeping with the mission of Concordia University. In order to protect the rights of students, the disciplinary procedure for dealing with cases of academic dishonesty follows these broad guidelines. Violations of academic integrity include “cheating” and “plagiarism” as defined by the university’s Student Code of Conduct (SCC). 2. The term “cheating” includes, but is not limited to: (1) use of any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, or examinations; (2) dependence upon the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; (3) the acquisition, without permission, of tests or other academic material belonging to a member of the University faculty or staff; or (4) academic deception (e.g. fabricating data, misrepresenting sources, misleading presentations, lying) in written or oral form. 3. The term “plagiarism” includes, but is not limited to, the use, by paraphrase or direct quotation, of the published or unpublished work of another person without full and clear acknowledgement. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials. 4. The term “recycling” may be new to some. Instructors expect that work submitted in a course is original work done for that course. These are two examples of recycling:  Submitting your own work, which has been submitted and graded for an earlier course, for a second course.  Submitting your own published work as original work for a course. B. Implementation of Academic Integrity Policies Process of Implementation Comment and instruction Faculty Member becomes aware of a violation of Academic Integrity and submits a Maxient Report 1. The instructor will gather and document all evidence of academic dishonesty in a clear and concise manner. The instructor will complete a Maxient Report following an initial discussion with the student. The report should assist in clarifying root issues. 2. The instructor will present this evidence to the student. The instructor will notify the student in writing that this has been done and will indicate the Dean of the College will provide information for the appeal process. 3. The instructor may prescribe academic penalties, including but not restricted to, the requirement of additional work, an assignment of a failing grade on the work in question, or a failing grade for the entire course. Any prescribed penalties must be in writing and include instructions for the appeal process. These should be documented through the Maxient Report. 4. If this is a repeated occurrence, the Department Chair may impose additional penalties, including but not limited to dismissal from the departmental program, suspension from the university, or expulsion from the university. 5. A student has the right to appeal the academic penalties imposed by the instructor by filing an appeal with the Collegiate Dean within 3 university business days of the documented imposition of penalties. A response regarding the appeal is normally received within 15 university business days. Steps for Appeal Regarding Academic Dishonesty can be found in the Faculty Handbook, 9.47. Report received by VPAA. Report copied to AVP-Graduate Studies Report is forwarded to Department Chair. AVP-Graduate Studies works with Department Chair to address issue. College Dean receives report and oversees the action taken. College Dean closes the case. Case is reviewed by the Academic Appeals Committee, chaired by AVP-Graduate Studies Further Appeal: Case is reviewed by the VPAA. No further appeals.

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9.70 ADDITIONAL GRADUATE FEES
1. Students enrolled in an Educational Specialist or Educational Doctorate degree programs must satisfactorily complete a written comprehensive examination for which there will be no fee. 2. Students enrolled in the Educational Doctorate degree program must pay an additional fee to cover the costs of the dissertation committee members and editing of the dissertation. The fee will be made known to the student at the time of acceptance into the program

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6.74 CLASSROOM ASSIGNMENTS
A. Regular classrooms are assigned by the Office of the Registrar when the class schedule is made. Classroom attribute preferences (e.g. SMART Board, capacity, layout) should be reported to the Office of the Registrar for consideration when rooms are being assigned. Technology problems in the classroom should be reported to Conference and Events. B. Special and additional classrooms may be requested for one or more periods by contacting Conference and Events. Use of rooms for times outside of regular class hours is arranged by using the facility equipment requisition (FER) form on the website. C. Each faculty member is encouraged to consider the successive users of the classroom. Prompt vacating of the classroom is expected at the close of the period. If classroom furniture is moved to facilitate special activities, the faculty member is expected to have the students return the furniture to the posted room configuration and left in good order at the end of each function or class position appropriate for most classes. D. Lights are to be turned off at the end of the class session. Windows are to be closed and doors locked by the instructor who uses the classroom during the last hour of the day and after an evening class session. Smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings.

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6.24b General Studies Major
Approval: A Major in General Studies is proposed by the Office of Academic Advising and approved by the dean of the college providing the plurality of the credits for the major.

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