Fire Near CSP Campus Saturday Aug. 21

Colleagues:

Many blessings on this day the Lord has made. I pray your rest and worship have refreshed you this weekend.

Saturday night, as some of you may be aware, a three-alarm fire occurred just north of the Selby Avenue bridge immediately west of our Kohler Building (west of the baseball field. The blaze totally destroyed the building to our west. It was used as a storage facility for tires and a host of other items. The Kohler building was spare complete destruction. However, two new vehicles used by our Sodexo partners were destroyed as were some of the other contents. We do not yet have a full estimate of the damage. The Kohler building has been used by CSP for decades as the location of our building department’s shop.

The Fire Marshall has launched an investigation into the cause of the fire and our assessment and clean-up efforts begin in earnest tomorrow. We are grateful for the tremendous work done by St. Paul Fire and Rescue and Police Departments to battle the blaze, secure the area and divert onlookers from the fire. The blaze began about 6:00 pm last night. The crews worked through the night and Sunday morning one of the fire department “towers” was still pouring water onto the burn site. Saturday night there were 5 towers battling the blaze at one point. Overall there were 16 fire crews and a total of 86 emergency service personnel on-site.

The property destroyed is one that we have worked to acquire over the years without success. Perhaps the owner will now be more open to selling the property to us. Because it is adjacent to both the baseball and softball complex and Parking Lot D it would be an ideal location to acquire and would provide several options for expansion to the southwest side of the campus.

As additional information is available, I will communicate it with you. Our Critical Incident and Sodexo teams did a great job supporting the work of the fire department. Our RAs, who are on campus for training, also did an excellent job of helping to secure the area and to bring water to the firefighters.

God is so good and continues to bless CSP abundantly. His Guardian Angels attended many last evening.

God’s peace be with you,

Brian

KSTP Story HERE
Fox story HERE

Orthopedic Injuries and Mental Health: What’s the Connection?

Summit physical therapist Joe Herdzina, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS, explores the connection between orthopedic injury and mental health struggles like depression and anxiety.

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Although you may not think that mental health challenges like depression and anxiety are connected with orthopedics, for many people, the two are interlinked. At times, orthopedic issues can certainly cause these problems due to limited mobility, limited social interaction, inappropriate education, and outsized expectations for healing. Read on to learn about the connection between orthopedic problems and mental health struggles.

There is a significant connection between reduced mobility, chronic pain, and mental health challenges like depression. “The simplest way to think about the connection among these is that they all start in the brain,” said Summit physical therapist Joe Herdzina, PT, DPT, OCS, SCS. “People who have decreased mobility as a result of injury have an increased risk of developing a depressed mood. They also may be missing out on the hormone boost that active movement and exercise can provide. It’s a vicious cycle of negative thoughts, which feed on each other and increase the difficulty of starting to move again.”

In addition, 30 to 50 percent of people with chronic pain also have depression and anxiety. So if you are dealing with orthopedic injuries, surgeries, or conditions that are causing chronic pain, what can you do to avoid mental health challenges as well? Here are some tips.

Tip 1: Take a holistic approach

 When your physical pain and orthopedic symptoms are affecting your mood, it can be helpful to try things like mindfulness exercises and meditation. Both of these can reduce pain and boost mood. To get started, there are many great YouTube videos, smartphone apps, and other free or low‐cost resources. Another idea is to listen to music that gives you enjoyment — anything that can provide a mood boost.

Tip 2: Get moving to improve orthopedic symptoms and boost mental health

It may seem counterintuitive to recommend movement and exercise to a person struggling with limited movement ability and pain. But it can really help. Studies show that even walking 6,000 steps a day can reduce joint pain in as little as six weeks for arthritis sufferers.

You don’t have to start a complex new workout regimen. Instead, start small. A simple walk around your neighborhood is a great first step.

“The first step is always the hardest,” Herdzina said. “But the benefits are real, and they’re significant.”

Tip 3: Get support

Use your peer group — friends, family, associates — to help you break the cycle of reduced mobility, pain, and mental health challenges. It can also be helpful to take a team approach, combating the problem from many angles. For example, some people, Herdzina said, could benefit from working with a physical therapist, a pain specialist, and a mental health therapist.

“Working with a team can help you put together a plan to help you feel better, with concrete steps to take,” Herdzina said.

Tip 4: Be kind to yourself for good orthopedic and mental health

Practicing self‐compassion is an important way to break the grip of depression and anxiety caused by pain. There are a variety of stress‐reduction therapies that can give you the mental clarity and energy you need.

Finally, in some cases, your doctor may recommend medication to deal with symptoms of depression or anxiety. Don’t be afraid to get help. It may be worth it to help you feel better after an injury or surgery.