Interviewing

After creating your resume, cover letter and completing applications, the interview is your time to show the interviewer your personality and sell your skills. This means you need not only explain how your education and experiences are the right fit for the position, but that your personality and beliefs are as well. The goal of employers is to find candidates who are a good “fit” within their organization.

Interested in completing a mock interview? Use Big Interview! To get started, click here and log in with your CSP email address. If this is your first time using the tool, you will have to register (in the upper right hand corner).

 

Collect pertinent details: When an interviewer calls or emails to schedule an interview, remember to collect a few pieces of information:

  • Interview time
  • Location
  • Interviewer’s name and title
  • Directions
  • Parking suggestions
  • Interview format (see section below)

Research the company and have a solid understanding of the position you are interviewing for. To begin, look at the company’s website. Look over the sections that explain more about their company, products and services, and click on additional links that may provide deeper insight into their company culture (blog, social media links, etc.). You can also research companies on LinkedIn.com, Glassdoor.com and ReferenceUSA.com.

Practice answering common interview questions, as well as more specific questions you may be asked related to the position. You can use the position description as your guide. Prepare questions to ask the interviewer that reflect your knowledge of the position and company. You can find common interview questions at the end of this handout.

 

Interview Questions
Many organizations use behavioral interviewing in their hiring process. This technique is used on the premise that it is the most accurate predictor of future performance based on past performance of a similar situation. One of the best ways to answer these types of questions is to use the STAR Technique.